Touring Clothing

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cancan64
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby cancan64 » Wed Jan 11, 2017 10:20 am

RonK wrote:No problem. I made a start updating it this afternoon. I'll share a copy with you when finished.


with all????

always good to see what people carry incase there is more stuff I need to find room for
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Aushiker
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Wed Jan 11, 2017 11:49 am

cancan64 wrote:always good to see what people carry incase there is more stuff I need to find room for


I have mine from my bike-packing the Holland Track available if interested. You should be able to download it from this Dropbox link. It is an Excel spreadsheet. I am still a little on the heavy side with the gear so maybe a little more fine tuning is required.
Andrew
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RonK
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Wed Jan 11, 2017 8:58 pm

OK, here is a link to my provisional list for an autumn bikepacking trip. Google Drive
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uad782
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby uad782 » Wed Jan 11, 2017 9:47 pm

Great list. Thanks.

brumby33
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby brumby33 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 12:24 pm

Ok Getting back to touring clothes......many of you especially Ron seem to be liking of the Ground Effect gear from NZ and I've known they've been around for some time, but due to the fact I'm quite largish, I found many cycling type clothes, even 3xl's seem to be very small cut or small in general......so I'm wondering what Ground Effect are like in the way of sizing, are they are generous fit? do they stretch....do the seams tend to be strong?

I've also been told by a Bike shop owner that larger people tend to do well with the Bibs as apposed to shorts due to the shorts slipping down. I'm sure you blokes arn't as big as me and I'm hoping to lose some of this size due to cycling but I struggle to get good cycling clothes my size. best i could do so far is some Bell Weathers knicks which are quite comfy.

Cheers

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Tim
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Tim » Tue Mar 07, 2017 12:46 pm

I've bought a fair amount of gear from Ground Effect over the last few years.
It is well made, durable and fits pretty reliably to their sizing charts.
That said I have pulled the hem stitching on several of their tops when lifting them up over my head with clinging sweaty skin. I've learnt to be a little bit more careful.
Most of their gear (tops and non-lycra shorts) are a looser mountain bike or touring styled fit.
I'd prefer a full length zipper but have no other criticism.
Fairly pricey but I'm still regularly wearing five year old merino tops.

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RonK
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Tue Mar 07, 2017 2:50 pm

Larger sizes are available, but European gear in particular is always small. However, larger sizes and fitting advice are available from sites such as Prendas Ciclismo, Fat Lad at the Back, Aerotech. You just need to do the research.

Ground Effect do have a limited range of big sizes. The jerseys are generously cut, bottoms are more true to size. I like the merino tops and find them very durable, the heatwave fabric summer tops I don't like so much, they don't wick very well and get saggy/baggy when sweaty.

Only yesterday I received a couple of Baked Alaska jerseys since I anticipate it will be cool when I tour NZ next month.

On previous tours I've taken three sets of bibs and jerseys, as well as extra shorts and shirts as streetwear. But since I'm bikepacking this trip and space is at a premium, I'm taking only one pair of MTB shorts, two pairs of liners and two jerseys, one set of streetwear and one set of merino long johns for camp.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Tue Mar 07, 2017 3:54 pm

I previously had Ground Effect tops in the larger sizes and found them pretty loose. However after a season or two of use I found they lost their shape, got saggy/baggy as Ron has commented.

My top of choice on my last tour in September 2016 was a Outdoor Research Echo Long Sleeved Duo Tee in Polygiene. Did fine, was cheaper, breathes well and washes and drys quickly.

I doubt I would bother again with cycling specific tops, instead look for running/sports shirts.
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Tim
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Tim » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:36 pm

RonK wrote:I like the merino tops and find them very durable, the heatwave fabric summer tops I don't like so much, they don't wick very well and get saggy/baggy when sweaty.


I agree. I actually find the merino in weather up to 28C more comfy than the summer weight and synthetic heatwave stuff.

Aushiker wrote: doubt I would bother again with cycling specific tops, instead look for running/sports shirts.


For touring I agree again.
The last couple of years I've been wearing button-up, loose fitting,long sleeved and collared shirts from the likes of Macpac and ExOfficio.
Better UV protection and a more casual look than cycling specific gear.
Neanderthal bogans and rednecks don't react quite so negatively to casually dressed cyclists.
Last edited by Tim on Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:38 pm

Tim wrote:The last couple of years I've been wearing button-up, loose fitting,long sleeved and collared shirts from the likes of Macpac and ExOfficio.
Better UV protection and a more casual look than cycling specific gear.


That is an idea. I will look into the options.
Andrew
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Tim
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Tim » Tue Mar 07, 2017 4:41 pm

Andrew, the synthetics pong very quickly but the beauty is that they dry very fast after a rinse or wash.
I still swear by cotton in hot dry weather though it's no good if things turn cold.

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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby brumby33 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 5:26 pm

Aushiker wrote:
I doubt I would bother again with cycling specific tops, instead look for running/sports shirts.


I'm thinking the same because a runner or someone playing a fast sport would sweat a lot more than a touring cyclist.....although in most cases for no-where near as long.....but the runners tops have to wick away sweat at a much faster pace.....I've been told even to look at soccer jerseys for the bike.

Thanks guys for all your other answers to my previous post, I need to start looking at alternative clothes for the bike soon.

Cheers

brumby
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Rodgerbiltit » Wed Mar 08, 2017 8:05 am

A plug for a Tassie company producing an excellent (expensive) product!

http://www.smittenmerino.com/buy-online ... 70g-size-m

I have the XL orange and find it "roomy" - which I like (I'm 93kg/182cm), so 2XL might be suitable?..

From the Sizing Chart:

"Please note: Our merino fabric has a unique stretch factor and can adapt enormously from one size to another. Most of the Smitten range is designed to fit the body."

Rodger

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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Wed Mar 08, 2017 9:41 am

Running/sports tops or hiking tops are probably ok for touring in summer. But I prefer to avoid the heat and tour in spring or autumn.

Once the weather cools and becomes more variable this stuff is not adequate. And when space is at a premium, carrying extra clothing is impractical, so high performance clothing becomes essential.

I'll certainly continue using cycling specific tops. Next tour I'm expecting daytime maximums in the mid-teens when the weather is fine - the perfect temperature for cycle touring comfort. So I'll be using a long-sleeved merino cycling jersey with a softshell front panel.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:10 am

RonK wrote:Running/sports tops or hiking tops are probably ok for touring in summer. But I prefer to avoid the heat and tour in spring or autumn.


Well at least here in WA and I suspect most of Australia, the main running season is in the cooler months. Half and full marathons tend to be scheduled in autumn/winter, e.g., Perth Marathon is the middle of the year.

Once the weather cools and becomes more variable this stuff is not adequate. And when space is at a premium, carrying extra clothing is impractical, so high performance clothing becomes essential.


Not in my experience at all.

I simply choose long-sleeved running/sport tops or short sleeve tops depending on my assessment of the weather. All my tops are made of technical materials; materials which BTW are going to much the same or the same as most cycling tops suitable for touring. Cycle touring is not such a big market that manufacturers are designing unique materials for it (I look pass the marketing/the labels), e.g., merino running tops (Icebreaker for example) is the same merino in cycling tops unless we now have running sheep and cycling sheep :). I simply go with the appropriate weight of the merino for my planned usage.

I don't carry extra clothing and besides the pretty common view that one needs a change of clothing I really don't see why you would simply for choosing a running/sports top. In fact on my approximately week long ride of the Holland Track I had the one so called "running" top and my RAB rain jacket. On the days it was cold (first three days) I simply wore both items. Later on I kept the jacket in the bag. Extra clothing? Not for me and differently not because of my "running" top.

I'll certainly continue using cycling specific tops. Next tour I'm expecting daytime maximums in the mid-teens when the weather is fine - the perfect temperature for cycle touring comfort. So I'll be using a long-sleeved merino cycling jersey with a softshell front panel.


The only difference with with my clothing is my top may be made of a man-made technical material and not merino. Mind you I have Icebreaker merino lightweight tops which I actually use running/training as well as cycling. When I first brought one a few years back it was marketed as a cycling top, then more recently as a running top ... same cut, same material ... just seen a better marketing opportunity I suspect. They only reason I didn't use mine on the last ride was that it was short-sleeved and I wanted a long-sleeved top.

Having used a Polygiene treated top I am no longer convinced that a merino is the only option to pass the "no-smell" test and I now make my purchasing decision more on what is available to purchase/price and/or I think is going to be the best option given the planned seasonal use. In fact I am not convinced I will bother with merino again but I still keep an eye on what is on offer just in case a good bargain pops up.

Personally I am glad I decided to think out of the square on this and to look pass the marketing as I have more use options for my clothing now and I have a greater choice of comfortable clothing for my sporting activities; cross-training, running and touring/bikepacking. The only time I still put on the lycra is when I am out doing more road sport cycling and even now I only have one or two tops.
Last edited by Aushiker on Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:20 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Stuntman » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:16 am

I've been liking the Shimano long sleeve button up fishing tops. Maybe not for everybody though being a looser casual fit. Good UV protection, neutral colours, vented, long sleeve but can roll and button the sleeves up, good collar, long at the back, dry quickly, casual looking and don't seem to stink too badly. Combine with a merino/sports t-shirt underlayer and/ora soft shell vest and I find it to be a reasonably versatile combo.

I am barrel chested (brick shithouse build) and getting comfortable tops can sometimes be a challenge. The aerotech casual/touring cycling tops look interesting - any feedback on these.
Last edited by Stuntman on Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:18 am

Stuntman wrote:I am barrel chested (brick shithouse build) and getting comfortable tops can sometimes be a challenge. The aerotech casual/touring cycling tops look interesting - any feedback on these.

Should suit you then - they are huge.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Stuntman » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:20 am

The one problem I have found when sourcing from US to suit my chest size - is that the waist sizing is huuuuuge. I donated a recent purchase to my niece and she made 2 skirts from material in one shirt
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Wed Mar 08, 2017 10:40 am

Aushiker wrote:
RonK wrote:Running/sports tops or hiking tops are probably ok for touring in summer. But I prefer to avoid the heat and tour in spring or autumn.


Well at least here in WA and I suspect most of Australia, the main running season is in the cooler months. Half and full marathons tend to be scheduled in autumn/winter, e.g., Perth Marathon is the middle of the year.

Once the weather cools and becomes more variable this stuff is not adequate. And when space is at a premium, carrying extra clothing is impractical, so high performance clothing becomes essential.


Not in my experience at all.

I simply choose long-sleeved running/sport tops or short sleeve tops depending on my assessment of the weather. All my tops are made of technical materials; materials which BTW are going to much the same or the same as most cycling tops suitable for touring. Cycle touring is not such a big market that manufacturers are designing unique materials for it (I look pass the marketing/the labels), e.g., merino running tops (Icebreaker for example) is the same merino in cycling tops unless we now have running sheep and cycling sheep :). I simply go with the appropriate weight of the merino for my planned usage.

I don't carry extra clothing and besides the pretty common view that one needs a change of clothing I really don't see why you would simply for choosing a running/sports top. In fact on my approximately week long ride of the Holland Track I had the one so called "running" top and my RAB rain jacket. On the days it was cold (first three days) I simply wore both items. Later on I kept the jacket in the bag. Extra clothing? Not for me and differently not because of my "running" top.

I'll certainly continue using cycling specific tops. Next tour I'm expecting daytime maximums in the mid-teens when the weather is fine - the perfect temperature for cycle touring comfort. So I'll be using a long-sleeved merino cycling jersey with a softshell front panel.


The only difference with with my clothing is my top may be made of a man-made technical material and not merino. Mind you I have Icebreaker merino lightweight tops which I actually use running/training as well as cycling. When I first brought one a few years back it was marketed as a cycling top, then more recently as a running top ... same cut, same material ... just seen a better marketing opportunity I suspect. They only reason I didn't use mine on the last ride was that it was short-sleeved and I wanted a long-sleeved top.

Having used a Polygiene treated top I am no longer convinced that a merino is the only option to pass the "no-smell" test and I now make my purchasing decision more on what is available to purchase/price and/or I think is going to be the best option given the planned seasonal use. In fact I am not convinced I will bother with merino again but I still keep an eye on what is on offer just in case a good bargain pops up.

Personally I am glad I decided to think out of the square on this and to look pass the marketing as I have more use options for my clothing no and I have a greater choice of comfortable clothing for sporting activities; cross-training, running and touring/bikepacking. The only time I still put on the lycra is when I am out doing more road sport cycling and even now I only one or two tops.


When the running season is held is irrelevant to the discussion. Typical running tops sold in QLD are ultralight and usually sleeveless - intended for maximum cooling. If you took this kind of clothing touring in spring or autumn you would need to carry extra for cold days.

My clothing choices have been painstakingly researched. They have nothing to do with marketing and everthing to do fitness for purpose, value and versatility.

No doubt it's fine to wear the same shirt for a week when you are alone on an outback track, but it's quite another thing when you are in daily contact with other people for a month. I've met unwashed cycle tourists several times along the road and it was an experience I would not wish to emulate.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby cancan64 » Wed Mar 08, 2017 11:01 am

I recently purchased a Merino T-shirt which was at the local markets aimed at trekking.... I sweat a lot and find my cycling jersey stinks after a short work commute so wore the shirt to the Gym, then cycled to work and cycled home, both extended and it didnt smell at all... now converted and will use this and a long sleeve for bikepacking.. trying to pick up some merino based skull caps to replace caps and buff which also are very smelly after a ride.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Wed Mar 08, 2017 12:25 pm

RonK wrote:When the running season is held is irrelevant to the discussion.


My comment was in response to yours about weather etc, so to now describe as irrelevant is rather odd indeed.

Typical running tops sold in QLD are ultralight and usually sleeveless - intended for maximum cooling.


I am not familiar with what tops are usually sold in Queensland but I suspect it is not that much different to WA. Also I would have thought it was obvious the discussion was about shirts/tops NOT running singlets. Yes you can by running singlets but you can also buy running/sports shirts/tops which is the focus of my comments discussion and I suspect understood by others given the follow up comments made.

My clothing choices have been painstakingly researched. They have nothing to do with marketing and everthing to do fitness for purpose, value and versatility.


Good for you. Clearly my experience differs and given my actual experience I am happy with my choices as I have explained. I haven't seen anything from you which in my view warrants a change my current approach; in fact I have moved on from making similar choices on past tours. Rather my recent choices in clothing have come about from what I have learned from engaging in a diversity of activities. The joys of real-life experiences :) Each to their own of course and your experiences may well be different. Being different however does not make you right and myself wrong or vice versa, rather it highlights that there are different options worth considering.

No doubt it's fine to wear the same shirt for a week when you are alone on an outback track, but it's quite another thing when you are in daily contact with other people for a month.


Just for the record on all my tours and bushwalks which have been broad in nature, been in groups and solo and so on I have never gone more than a week between opportunities to wash my clothes so I find the comment about a "month" rather odd indeed. Similarly when appropriate I take additional clothes. What I prefer to do is to adopt a flexible approach, considering carefully my needs given the tour/bikepack/walk and hence making my choices accordingly. I also like to reflect back on each tour afterwards to learn from it which is why I have added another element to my clothing choice.

Anyway I think it is time to leave you to it ... have a nice ride in NZ with you choice of clothing. I hope you are comfortable and dry :)
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Wed Mar 08, 2017 12:30 pm

cancan64 wrote:I recently purchased a Merino T-shirt which was at the local markets aimed at trekking.... I sweat a lot and find my cycling jersey stinks after a short work commute so wore the shirt to the Gym, then cycled to work and cycled home, both extended and it didnt smell at all... now converted and will use this and a long sleeve for bikepacking.. trying to pick up some merino based skull caps to replace caps and buff which also are very smelly after a ride.


That is my experience as well with my Icebreaker tops, but my Icebreaker tops are not 100% merino IIRC. My only niggle with them is that I find them a touch on the warm side in summer irrespective of my activity so I prefer them for the cooler months.

Mind you I have another brand (at work so cannot recall the details) which I have found not as good/comfortable. Maybe a different weight/mix. I guess it is like most clothing, there are differences in brands.
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby RonK » Thu Mar 09, 2017 10:14 am

Aushiker wrote:Anyway I think it is time to leave you to it ... have a nice ride in NZ with you choice of clothing. I hope you are comfortable and dry :)

I have toured NZ several times, have reflected on each tour afterwards and learned from the experience - I have a very good idea what works well , and what does not.

For the next visit I have considered carefully my needs given the tour/bikepack/walk I've planned and hence made my choices accordingly.

And I will wash and wear fresh clothes daily. So I am indeed very confident that I will comfortable and dry. I'm not leaving it to hope. :wink:
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Thoglette » Thu Mar 09, 2017 1:50 pm

Aushiker wrote:
Having used a Polygiene treated top I am no longer convinced that a merino is the only option to pass the "no-smell" test and I now make my purchasing decision more on what is available to purchase/price and/or I think is going to be the best option given the planned seasonal use. In fact I am not convinced I will bother with merino again but I still keep an eye on what is on offer just in case a good bargain pops up.


You did note you get to wash at least weekly.

A mate of mine who used to do 30+ days without washing noted that the synthetics tended to clog up with crap (dust, sweat, skin) where as they found the merino didn't.

Just an anecdote from long ago and far away. :D
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Re: Touring Clothing

Postby Aushiker » Thu Mar 09, 2017 3:23 pm

Thoglette wrote:
A mate of mine who used to do 30+ days without washing noted that the synthetics tended to clog up with crap (dust, sweat, skin) where as they found the merino didn't.


I don't think I would be keen going that long without some sort of washing, irrespective of the material :).

That said I was okay with the performance of the Polygiene treated top over the week but I am not sure I would push it much beyond that. I think it was worth the experiment and I will wear it again in similar circumstances.
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