What's in your "kitchen"?

Re: What's in your

Postby rifraf » Thu Aug 22, 2013 1:49 am

RonK wrote:
Better still, ditch the Pocket Rocket and get the new 178g Optimus Vega or 187g MSR Windpro II. I'm tempted to add the Vega to my stove collection.


Well I'm kinda looking longingly at the Primus Omnilight Ti at the moment which with an adapter can be fitted into my Trangia and can use gas canisters as well as the usual assortment of liquid fuels should one want to carry the extra weight.
I'm not sold yet mainly because of the noise but have to admit I'm tempted. :roll:
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by BNA » Thu Aug 22, 2013 9:27 am

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Re: What's in your

Postby RonK » Thu Aug 22, 2013 9:27 am

rifraf wrote:
RonK wrote:
Better still, ditch the Pocket Rocket and get the new 178g Optimus Vega or 187g MSR Windpro II. I'm tempted to add the Vega to my stove collection.


Well I'm kinda looking longingly at the Primus Omnilight Ti at the moment which with an adapter can be fitted into my Trangia and can use gas canisters as well as the usual assortment of liquid fuels should one want to carry the extra weight.
I'm not sold yet mainly because of the noise but have to admit I'm tempted. :roll:

I don't see any particular advantage in multi-fuel stoves, but the Primus Omnilite Ti should be a good one. Have you every tied burning some of these fuel? Kero, petrol, diesel - ugh the smoke and stench would put you off eating.

Can't understand why you want to bother with the Trangia though, it would be a better stove by itself.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby rifraf » Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:35 am

Unlike myself, if you remember to turn the Trangia vent into the wind, you can cook in bad conditions without detriment to the unit and still get your breakfast.
I like that it comes with two pots as when on the road there's times I still like to actually cook and the ability to do different ingredients separately can make the difference between enjoying a meal and just having one.
That little kettle is a god send as with being a big tea/coffee drinker, I don't have to worry about whether or not my cooking pots are dirty to enjoy a brew (Russian caravan tea just isnt the same with cous cous floating in it).
For me its an almost perfect configuration allowing me better than just boil up meals as well as the ability to relax with a cuppa without consideration of whether or not pots have been cleaned.
I looked at the way many cycle tourists get by with just the alcohol burner, wind break and single pot but quickly realised that it just would never suit me and my style of travel especially as I'm a big hot beverage drinker.
I also like the fact it all folds away tidily without dirtying up the contents of my panniers even if I've had to break camp quickly without "proper" cleaning of my pots.
Its light enough for me, I've gotten used to its somewhat relaxed speed and theres little to go wrong with it.
I think it comes down to being able to have dinner, desert and a cuppa at my own pace and independent of each other and dishes done when I'm good and ready (which just might not be till morning)
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What's in your

Postby RonK » Thu Aug 22, 2013 12:29 pm

rifraf wrote:Unlike myself, if you remember to turn the Trangia vent into the wind, you can cook in bad conditions without detriment to the unit and still get your breakfast.
I like that it comes with two pots as when on the road there's times I still like to actually cook and the ability to do different ingredients separately can make the difference between enjoying a meal and just having one.
That little kettle is a god send as with being a big tea/coffee drinker, I don't have to worry about whether or not my cooking pots are dirty to enjoy a brew (Russian caravan tea just isnt the same with cous cous floating in it).
For me its an almost perfect configuration allowing me better than just boil up meals as well as the ability to relax with a cuppa without consideration of whether or not pots have been cleaned.
I looked at the way many cycle tourists get by with just the alcohol burner, wind break and single pot but quickly realised that it just would never suit me and my style of travel especially as I'm a big hot beverage drinker.
I also like the fact it all folds away tidily without dirtying up the contents of my panniers even if I've had to break camp quickly without "proper" cleaning of my pots.
Its light enough for me, I've gotten used to its somewhat relaxed speed and theres little to go wrong with it.
I think it comes down to being able to have dinner, desert and a cuppa at my own pace and independent of each other and dishes done when I'm good and ready (which just might not be till morning)

All up to your organisation I guess. A typical camp meal for me would consist of soup, main, pudding and tea.

After soup I have to wash my cup before making tea anyway so it's no trouble to wash a pot as well, then the water to heat the pudding makes me a nice cup of Williamsons Earl Gray.

Stove and cookware packs to half the size of a Trangia, even if I did opt to take two pots.

Maybe that's why I don't need a semi-trailer to carry my stuff :) :) :)

Btw - I noticed that the Omnilite includes a folding windscreen.
Last edited by RonK on Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby il padrone » Thu Aug 22, 2013 10:07 pm

I'm with rifraf. I like to cook my meals :wink:
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby rifraf » Fri Aug 23, 2013 12:06 am

I hit the button on both a click-stand
http://www.click-stand.com/
for holding my bike vertical (and off walls/ground), and a Primus Omnilite Ti multifuel cooker tonight (Amazon).
http://www.primus.eu/templates/pages/Pr ... emId=93966

These have a better reputation for simmering than Trangia's own multi-fuel burner (also designed by Primus) and have the benefit of being able to be used as a standalone unit.
I can should I desire, with the aid of an adapter, mate this to my Trangia storm-cooker.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:36 am

Just waiting for more stock to come in, and I'll be adding an Airspresso to my kitchen kit...

Image

I dunno if I can be bothered with pumping it though - maybe I'll get some food-grade NO2 or CO2 cartridges.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Fri Aug 23, 2013 11:38 am

rifraf wrote:I hit the button on both a click-stand...

Jeez, you got that click-stand order in just in time...
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby rifraf » Fri Aug 23, 2013 12:50 pm

RonK wrote:
rifraf wrote:I hit the button on both a click-stand...

Jeez, you got that click-stand order in just in time...

I'm the King of procrastination when it comes to purchase decisions.
I struggled to remember your advice on how many segments (should have thought to check my PMs).
I ordered the Max 6 segment with 3 fat feet and some contraption to attach it to the frame (underneath the top tube is likely in my case is my thoughts so far) although seat-tube is possible due to poor positioning of the bottle-cage attachment points (bottom of bottle hits down tube). :roll:
Got impatient for a response to an email to Surly about frame tube diameter so just gave them a ring.
They ran off immediately to grab a measurement for me so hopefully its "all good". :D
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Fri Aug 23, 2013 12:56 pm

rifraf wrote:
RonK wrote:
rifraf wrote:I hit the button on both a click-stand...

Jeez, you got that click-stand order in just in time...

I'm the King of procrastination when it comes to purchase decisions.
I struggled to remember your advice on how many segments (should have thought to check my PMs).
I ordered the Max 6 segment with 3 fat feet and some contraption to attach it to the frame (underneath the top tube is likely in my case is my thoughts so far) although seat-tube is possible due to poor positioning of the bottle-cage attachment points (bottom of bottle hits down tube). :roll:
Got impatient for a response to an email to Surly about frame tube diameter so just gave them a ring.
They ran off immediately to grab a measurement for me so hopefully its "all good". :D

Well, 6 segments will be fine - my recommendation was based on carrying it in a handlebar bag, but if you mount it on the frame it doesn't really matter. Personally I don't like too much clutter on the frame - a touring bike has enough already with lots of bidon cages, so I carry both my pump and click-stand in my bags.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby rifraf » Fri Aug 23, 2013 1:38 pm

RonK wrote:Well, 6 segments will be fine - my recommendation was based on carrying it in a handlebar bag, but if you mount it on the frame it doesn't really matter. Personally I don't like too much clutter on the frame - a touring bike has enough already with lots of bidon cages, so I carry both my pump and click-stand in my bags.


I've promised my dslr it can join my next tour via my handlebar bag so dont want anthing in there likely to mark my nikon. :idea:
I took a camera on my cross country trip but found taking it out of closed trailer box or panniers just too much effort. :roll:
Next tour, I've promised myself (and a few others) to keep a camera close at hand due to recalling too many lost opportunities of things I'm now kicking myself I didn't save for posterity (or even the opportunity to ease the posterior - get off the saddle for a mo) :wink:
I did like your reasoning however and this influenced me to grab a click-stand with the max amount of segments to insure a smaller package, to fit the inside of the bar bag. :idea:
I've managed to mount my pump on my seat-tube.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby petie » Sat Aug 24, 2013 12:26 am

RonK wrote:Just waiting for more stock to come in, and I'll be adding an Airspresso to my kitchen kit...

Image

I dunno if I can be bothered with pumping it though - maybe I'll get some food-grade NO2 or CO2 cartridges.


Ffffffffffffaaaaark! Now look what you have done! Must. have. now.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby clackers » Sat Aug 24, 2013 6:27 am

I'm not a massive coffee drinker at home, but when I do, I use a similar Aero Press with filter paper rounds rather than a machine. No reason it couldn't go on the bike except it's longer than this thing.
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What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Sat Aug 24, 2013 9:23 am

clackers wrote:I'm not a massive coffee drinker at home, but when I do, I use a similar Aero Press with filter paper rounds rather than a machine. No reason it couldn't go on the bike except it's longer than this thing.

There is a torrefazione across the road from my office, and the owner is keen to sell me an Aeropress. I've sampled the brew and it is pretty good. It's light but quite bulky which put me off.
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What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Sat Aug 24, 2013 9:56 am

rifraf wrote:
RonK wrote:Well, 6 segments will be fine - my recommendation was based on carrying it in a handlebar bag, but if you mount it on the frame it doesn't really matter. Personally I don't like too much clutter on the frame - a touring bike has enough already with lots of bidon cages, so I carry both my pump and click-stand in my bags.


I've promised my dslr it can join my next tour via my handlebar bag so dont want anthing in there likely to mark my nikon. :idea:
I took a camera on my cross country trip but found taking it out of closed trailer box or panniers just too much effort. :roll:
Next tour, I've promised myself (and a few others) to keep a camera close at hand due to recalling too many lost opportunities of things I'm now kicking myself I didn't save for posterity (or even the opportunity to ease the posterior - get off the saddle for a mo) :wink:

Hehe. Are you still dragging that ballast around? :D :D :D

I learned that lesson years ago, stopped pretending my photographic skills justified an SLR, and switched to a high-end compact.

As a result, not only do I capture more images, but my compositions have improved greatly now that I'm not distracted by the technology.

The Sony RX100 I'm currently using produces very satisfying images and takes up only a quarter of the available space in my handlebar bag. :)
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby clackers » Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:10 am

RonK wrote:

The Sony RX100 I'm currently using produces very satisfying images and takes up only a quarter of the available space in my handlebar bag.


A fantastic camera by all accounts, notwithstanding no lenses for it versus a DSLR and its cost versus other compacts.
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What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby RonK » Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:25 am

clackers wrote:
RonK wrote:

The Sony RX100 I'm currently using produces very satisfying images and takes up only a quarter of the available space in my handlebar bag.


A fantastic camera by all accounts, notwithstanding no lenses for it versus a DSLR and its cost versus other compacts.

You have to get out of the thinking that you *need* interchangeable lens. You simply don't need them for the typical landscape type shots you are likely to take on a bike tour. They are heavy, bulky and frankly just plain inconvenient.

The RX100 is an enthusiast compact, and its price relative to other compacts reflects it's quality and superior features and capabilities. The RX100 M2 is about to be released and includes a bunch of new and upgraded features.

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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby rifraf » Sat Aug 24, 2013 2:00 pm

RX100 is on my to get list.
Xtra-wheel trailer is a bigger priority though and by the time I have it with dynohub wheel built up, the RX100 prices should have dropped nicely due to the newer version having come out.
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby clackers » Sat Aug 24, 2013 5:01 pm

RonK wrote:You have to get out of the thinking that you *need* interchangeable lens. You simply don't need them for the typical landscape type shots you are likely to take on a bike tour.


Ansel Adams would have said you don't even need colour. :smile:

I've found I like 10-20mm for landscapes, and 200-300mm for wildlife and other riders in action.

My Pentax K-30 is small for what it is, weather sealed, and its kit lenses are small and sealed, too.

If I don't have room, such as only using a saddle bag on my roadie or backpack on MTB, my Nikon Coolpix P7700 gives me 28-200mm equivalent. It's cheaper and thicker than your RX100 (whose size I love - handled it last night at Ted's).

If I've got even less room, I end up using my phone, which will make do with Panorama and HDR.
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Re: What's in your

Postby il padrone » Sat Aug 24, 2013 7:29 pm

clackers wrote:My Pentax K-30 is small for what it is, weather sealed, and its kit lenses are small and sealed, too.


Dimensions 130 x 97 x 71 mm


Not small by my standards :|
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Re: What's in your

Postby clackers » Sat Aug 24, 2013 8:49 pm

il padrone wrote:
Not small by my standards :|


You should check out the size of 'real' DSLRs, IP! :D

This one is Backpacker Magazine's current choice:

http://www.backpacker.com/editors-choice-2013-pentax-k-30-dslr-camera/gear/17499
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Re: What's in your

Postby RonK » Sat Aug 24, 2013 9:43 pm

clackers wrote:
il padrone wrote:
Not small by my standards :|


You should check out the size of 'real' DSLRs, IP! :D

This one is Backpacker Magazine's current choice:

http://www.backpacker.com/editors-choice-2013-pentax-k-30-dslr-camera/gear/17499

Nice, apart from the video, it is reviewed very favourably. If I wanted interchangeable lens I would choose the Lumix GX7, however that's a slippery path that I'm determined not to start down. There is no room for a DSLR or lenses in my touring kit.
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Re: What's in your

Postby il padrone » Sat Aug 24, 2013 10:11 pm

clackers wrote:You should check out the size of 'real' DSLRs, IP! :D


I do not want nor see a need for a DSLR.



What does this have to do with kitchens anyway ???
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Re: What's in your

Postby clackers » Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:59 pm

RonK wrote: If I wanted interchangeable lens I would choose the Lumix GX7


That looks okay, Ron ... if you wanted to stay Sony, there's the NEX.

RonK wrote: There is no room for a DSLR or lenses in my touring kit.


In a two pannier config for me, there's room for camera in one and alternative lens in the other.

My wife and I do day trips or weekenders, though. We've never travelled for more than four days, and it's usually been credit card touring, so we're usually not carrying camping or cooking gear.

Mind you, see the link in the next post for a couple who did the American South West with DSLR and lenses ... talk about dedication! :)
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Re: What's in your "kitchen"?

Postby clackers » Sun Aug 25, 2013 9:07 pm

il padrone wrote:
I do not want nor see a need for a DSLR.


No one's saying you do, IP, but you loved this video you linked last year:

http://vimeo.com/34303784

That couple took a massive Canon DSLR, three big lenses and a tripod.

il padrone wrote:What does this have to do with kitchens anyway ???


RifRaf was talking about the clickstand, and how he was thinking of reserving space in his handlebar bag for his DSLR, Ron suggested a very good compact as a substitute.

Usual broadening of the conversation. :)
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