New Touring Bike

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby GregLR » Mon Feb 10, 2014 9:17 pm

il padrone wrote:Such head-tube extensions are generally fairly non-standard frame treatments even amongst touring makers. However the Thorn Sherpa DOES have a head-tube extension.

IP - Yes, you are right of course, the Sherpa does have a HT extension but it's only about 1cm (I did say it hasn't got "much" of an extension) which in my view is insufficient for a touring bike, whereas the LHT approx 3cm HT extension is good for touring purposes in that you can get the bars sufficiently high without too many spacers.

Behind my comment is concern about the racer fashion of a large drop between the saddle and bars being inappropriately reflected to an extent on touring frames.

Greg
GregLR
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:43 pm
Location: Shellharbour

by BNA » Mon Feb 10, 2014 9:51 pm

BNA
 

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby alanm » Mon Feb 10, 2014 9:51 pm

Phil, What sort of pain do you get in your wrists. Is it actually in the wrist or is it in the fleshy pad at the base of your thumbs? If you're able, can you post up a pic of how you ride on the bars.

Cheers,
Al
alanm
 
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Mar 17, 2010 10:45 pm
Location: Sometimes Perth, mostly West Oz country.....

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby il padrone » Mon Feb 10, 2014 10:01 pm

My Thorn Nomad has virtually no head-tube extension. But it does have a sloping top tube, which places the top of the head tube a good 5-8cm higher than the head tube on my old Giant Sedona. Result - the bars are just a bit higher than I used to have, so the same result as head tube extension*.

In other words, you always need to look at the total package and place the key measuring points in context.

Hint - to really take the load off your wrists, consider using North Road bars.


* Some prefer the appearance of a horizontal top-tube; I really dislike the look of the extended head-tube. Aesthetics of course :wink: .
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 19612
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby GregLR » Sat Feb 15, 2014 8:34 pm

il padrone wrote:My Thorn Nomad has virtually no head-tube extension. But it does have a sloping top tube, which places the top of the head tube a good 5-8cm higher than the head tube on my old Giant Sedona. Result - the bars are just a bit higher than I used to have, so the same result as head tube extension*...
In other words, you always need to look at the total package and place the key measuring points in context.

IP - I understand your point. My wife's Thorn 'Sherpa' has a mildly sloping top tube & (as mentioned) a 1cm HT extension and still she needed 7cm of spacers to get the drop bars about level with the saddle. I exhaustively considered the key measuring points, by setting up the front of the bike as best I could and testing my wife's position by sitting her on it, as well as taking into account the settings of her other bikes, before the steerer tube was cut and the headset was installed in combination with the stem, spacers and bars.

This is the bike, by the way, which is used for credit card touring. I think that the aesthetics would be improved by more HT extension. This is the smallest size Sherpa (all sizes have 26" wheels) - the only one that gives sufficient standover height.

Greg

Image
GregLR
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Thu Feb 17, 2011 11:43 pm
Location: Shellharbour

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby philmart » Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:08 pm

Thanks again for the comments. Been changing things slightly and riding a bit lately.Checking sites to try and get a good guide to setup. There are a few things i have changed and my wrists are no longer hurting (this could be sue to just getting used to a new position though).

One problem I had with the Brooks was that my left side sit bone was hurting more than the right. The seat LOOKED to be straight (just looking over the top against the seat tube) however on my ride home today I stopped and measured from a few different angles and found that it was indeed skewed off to the right. I straightened it up and sit bone not so sore.

I think also I may need to look at a shorter headstem. I have dropped the stem by one of the large spacers and it is now starting to feel a lot more comfortable. I have tilted the handlebar as well and I think this also helped.

It really is perhaps that I need to make more changes than I have on my other bikes (seats up, start riding), and I am learning quite a lot about it on the way.

Yes, Ronk I do ride with gloves. I still don't feel quite comfortable yet, but like my wrists I am hoping that will pass with some tweaking.
philmart
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:08 am

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby rifraf » Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:05 pm

Consider making one adjustment at a time.
You could end up adjusting something that might bring out an ache in you somewhere and not recognize that another adjustment may have diminished the original ache.
Surly Ogre, Carry Freedom Y-frame Trailer, Extrawheel trailer.
User avatar
rifraf
 
Posts: 2589
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:55 pm
Location: Two Rocks, WA

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby Warin » Tue Feb 18, 2014 9:21 am

Best practice -

One adjustment at a time
Small steps
Keep notes.
User avatar
Warin
 
Posts: 162
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:13 pm

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby philmart » Sat Feb 22, 2014 8:31 pm

Well I think I am close to the end of my dialling in .. every few days I have been changing things. I think the biggest changes have been recently with (in the last four or five days) changing the seat fore and after position one centimetre forward and putting in the new stem which is one centimetre shorter. I am still close to the KOPS rule (on or about on the centre of the pedal axle) and for the last two 30km rides I have had very little wrist pain! I still have a Nitto Noodle sitting in the garage to install in the next few days, but want the changes I have put through to settle.

It could be that I am getting used to the bike, who knows, but whatever .. I do feel more comfortable now.

A few things that have come in over the last few days. The Ortlieb Bike Packer Plus panniers which are currently residing on the rear Surly rack until my Tubus front racks come in. I also installed my Velo Orange Wheel Stabiliser - a very nice addition - well worth the cost.

Still to come in .. the tubus duo front rack,Ortlieb Sports Packer Plus panniers and some Marathon Mondial 2.00.

Thanks for the tips about small changes and notes. It was hard not to make too many changes at once and see what the result was but holding back for a day or so to allow two rides certainly has helped me understand what big differences small changes to the bike setup can make.

Probably have done 450 odd kms on it now. Not ecstatic yet .. but feeling better about it for sure
philmart
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:08 am

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby RonK » Sat Feb 22, 2014 10:35 pm

philmart wrote:I still have a Nitto Noodle sitting in the garage to install in the next few days, but want the changes I have put through to settle.

I'm using Nitto Noodles - I find the slight backward sweep quite comfortable. When you do fit them, rotate the bars so the tops are flat and and position the levers as high as you can get them on the bend (and still reach the levers from the drops of course).

Like this...
Image
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...
User avatar
RonK
 
Posts: 5791
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby il padrone » Sun Feb 23, 2014 7:38 am

When it comes to comfort with road bars I've always rotated the bars so the top section to the hoods is flat, and the ends of the drops are pointing roughly towads the rear axle. The hoods of the brakes are in line with the drops, or maybe a little higher. Brake levers must be reached from the drops, so don't place them too high.

Just my style for comfort.
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 19612
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby philmart » Thu Feb 27, 2014 8:26 pm

Well the nitto noodle is on. Am trying different angles with this taking into account Ronk and IP advice as well. Still finding it hard to get comfortable but my sore wrists have gone now. I suppose I am getting closer to something that works for me. Maybe now it is just something I need to get used to!!

Also have received and attached the Tubus Duo front rack. Thought it would be hard work but it worked out to be quite easy. Changed out tyres for Schwalbe Mondial 2.00 from the original Continentals 1.75.
philmart
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 10:08 am

Re: New Touring Bike

Postby alfine8 » Sun Mar 23, 2014 11:47 am

I'd also question if it is safe to have so many spacers under the bars - the usual limit is 50mm.
[/quote]

Hi Ron,
The steerer tube on the surly is steel, and they mention somewhere on there site that you can stack it up to heaven and back if you want.
alfine8
 
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed May 01, 2013 7:02 pm

Previous

Return to Touring Bikes and Equipment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot]



Popular Bike Shops
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Ebay Ebay AU
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers