Buying a road bike - price range $1500

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Buying a road bike - price range $1500

Postby cam_sku » Tue Apr 17, 2007 1:52 pm

Hey,
I am completely new at all of this. I want to give cycling a go for excersize and enjoyment, my Dad used to race and still gets out there on the road every week so I guess it is in my blood. i am interested in road bikes.

I would really appriicaite some advice - so far I have looked at the Trek 1200, some of the Scott bikes, Giant and Argon (although this is starting to get beyond my price range). I would like to keep it to about $1500 and would prefer that this included pedals and shoes but am willing to go beyond this prce if it is worthwhile. My initial enquiries seem to indicate that the Shimano 105 group set is where I would like to be aiming but I would be interested in opinions on this as well.

As you can see I need advice on pretty much everything so any information would be great.

Cheers.

Cam
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by BNA » Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:45 pm

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Postby mikesbytes » Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:45 pm

Hey Cam, welcome to the forum

Your Dad is quite experienced and would probably have a reasonably good idea as to what you should buy.

Tell us what kind of riding you will be doing and what kind of body you have (gender, height, long arms, whatever) and we can give you our 2 bob on the topic.

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Postby cam_sku » Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:55 pm

Hey,

Thanks for the reply.

Dad is experienced but hasn't really been buying bikes for a while - he gets them made at Cecil Walker in Melbnourne so he dosent really have a handle on the brands around at the moment.

I am male, 6"3 so I am guessing that I would need something in a XL (is 60-63cms right?). I am interested in getting out on the road and riding for a couple of hours - I suppose around 40kms?

Cheers
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Postby MountGower » Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:23 pm

G'day
Last edited by MountGower on Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mikesbytes » Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:49 pm

As per MountGrower, it would appear that you need better than the bottom end of the range, so aim for Tiagra quality or better.

You are male, young and big, so you are likely to put the bike under more stress than the average rider. Having nominated 40k as a typlical ride puts you in range of the club rides that possibly your Dad does. 40k will become 80k in no time at all.

Frame size - have a look at the frame size calculator linked in my signature.

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Postby LuckyPierre » Tue Apr 17, 2007 4:57 pm

cam_sku wrote: ... he gets them made at Cecil Walker ...

I think you should position yourself strategically when he next gets rid of one. :wink:

MountGower's advice re Tiagra is pretty sound - it might even let you come in under budget - that way, you won't be too much out of pocket if you upgrade, or give riding away in a few months.
Why not give bicycle re-cycling a go. Especially if you're in Melbourne! I lucked out in the second-hand bike stakes, so I'm a bit biased when it comes to getting started.
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Postby cam_sku » Tue Apr 17, 2007 5:35 pm

This is great stuff, thank you all.

Am I right in saying that the Tiagra gear is all of the moving parts (gears, breaks and so on)?

In that case how much does the frame and wheels matter? Does it matter which of the brands that I mentioned I choose?

I love the suggestion of waiting for Dad's frame but he only got this one 4 months ago so it will be a while.

I also like the idea of going second hand but so far most of the ads I have seen the bikes are a bit small.
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Postby europa » Tue Apr 17, 2007 5:55 pm

The drivetrain and brakes - centre bracket, cranks, chainrings, chain, rear cassette, front and rear derailleurs, brakes and shifters, are referred to as a 'groupset'.

Shimano road groupsets work on the following hierachy.

The un-named stuff (varying degrees of rubishness)

Sora - recreational use.

Tiagra - top of the line recreational but still quite raceable (as is Sora actually)

105 - the start of the racing components

Ultegra - good quality racing gear and good enough for most of us.

Dura Ace - the pro racing bits.

As you go from one to the next, you get lighter weight, longer lasting and better performance.

BUT, all this is relative. Tuco races riding a bike with a Sora groupset and I would suggest that his bike is still outriding him - ie, going to a higher groupset isn't going to magically move him up the standings.
Mike races a Giant OCR2 with Tiagra and if you read through the site, you'll note that he's doing pretty darned well thank you very much.

The point is, better is indeed better, and you do get what you pay for, but for most people, the rider is far more important than the bike he rides - you have to be very good to exploit the better gear.

Which isn't to say you can't aspire to or own the better gear. My own bike is a mix of DeoreLX and Ultegra (mtb and road), basically Ultegra level, yet I'm one of the clydesdales in this mob of thoroughbreds. Having ridden my bike (Ultegra) back to back with my son's bike (Tiagra), the difference is startling and well worth paying for BUT, my son's bike is still a very good bike to ride and the groupset works very well.

I think you are best served buying the best frame you can for the task you are going to put it to. As you wear out bits on the groupset, replace them with better quality components.

For your purposes, check out the Giant OCR2. Full Tiagra. Triple chain ring and a more relaxed componentry than pure racing bikes such as the Trek1000. So why suggest it? Because it will take you racing, it will take you long distance riding, it'll commute to school or whatever. It'll take anything you can throw at it until you are fit and strong enough to justify a pure racing bike at the Ultegra level. Why suggest a bike with a triple chainring? You'll know as soon as you get to some decent hills. You can ride the hills with a double chainring but if my son (he plays club soccer at a level above his age grouping and is the fittest in his team by a long way) finds a need for the triple from time to to, I reckon they're not a bad thing to have.

But whatever you choose, make sure the thing fits you properly. That is more important than anything else. Buy it, love it and wear it out, and the next choice will be a lot more obvious.

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Postby Bnej » Tue Apr 17, 2007 7:13 pm

I have a new bike with the current Tiagra set (an OCR C3) and it really is pretty good.

You get two trim positions on each chain ring, which works perfectly. There's gear indicators in little windows on the brake hoods, which is useful from my point of view. It shifts smoothly enough with the right technique.

I've also tried a Trek 1000 with an older Sora set, and it wasn't bad - not as nice, but certainly tolerable.

I'd go OCR 2 as well. This comes with Shimano road pedals, so you can just buy your shoes for about $200, computer for $50, should total < $1500.

If you want a racier geometry, Trek 1200 is about the same price, but a bit lighter and more aero with a double chainring instead of a triple.
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Postby cam_sku » Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:25 pm

Thanks again.

I am getting the impression that Giant are more everyday and useable than Trek. I was considering the 1200.

When you say "racier geometry" what does that mean?

Also I dont mean to sound stupid but what is the difference between a triple and double chain ring?

Cheers
Cam
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Postby stickgc » Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:43 pm

I was in a similar position recently (same distance per ride and same budget). I ended up going with a Cell bike. You can get a full 105 bike for under your budget. To be honest, with my level of experience, I couldn't tell the difference between any of the brands I tested. That's why I got a Cell. It had the running gear everyone told me about, felt the same, but cost less. I don't expect it to be as good as some of the popular brands, but I'm sure it will do me for at least a few years, and it may surprise me with how well it goes. I thought along the same lines as Europa, with experience the next purchase will be easier.

BTW, MountGower's right. My 30- 40km rides have turned into 50- 60km rides :lol:

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Postby Wanta-bike » Tue Apr 17, 2007 8:54 pm

cam_sku wrote:Thanks again.

I am getting the impression that Giant are more everyday and useable than Trek. I was considering the 1200.

When you say "racier geometry" what does that mean?

Also I dont mean to sound stupid but what is the difference between a triple and double chain ring?

Cheers
Cam


i could be wrong, but i think that "racier geometry" is more of a "lean forward, go-go-go, arms and back streched out" position; as opposed to a "more upright and relaxed position".

triple and double chainrings: where the cranks/pedals are, you'll have either one, two and/or three rings where the chain goes around. thus double chainring you'll have two of these rings, one smaller than the other; triple chainring you'll obviously have three of these rings - "small, med and large"
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Postby Mulger bill » Tue Apr 17, 2007 10:10 pm

G'Day Cam, Welcome :)

I've just recently got back onto skinny tyres after twenty mumble years away and twelve years MTB, with the help of the members here and a great LBS, I picked the Giant OCR2. I checked out a few other bikes but couldn't go past the way I felt on her. :D

I'm very impressed with the Tiagra group on the OCR2, the only bits not Tiagra are the brakes which are Tektro dual pivots, and they do a great job of pulling me up from speed. Having said that, I've had no experience with road groups for too many years to give a valid comparison.

IMO, get the bike in your price range that feels "special" under you, bits wear out and can be upgraded then.

Good luck with the hunt mate, get your dad involved too, you can't go past experience by your side in the shop.

Shaun.

PS Bnej I saw a C3 while I was in the LBS today. Is that blue on black carbon secksee or what? :D
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Postby Bnej » Tue Apr 17, 2007 10:21 pm

Dead right. A pure racing geometry has you leaning further forward and lower to cut wind resistance. The OCR bikes are a bit more upright which reduces the strain on back & arms.

The OCR has a wider range of gears than the 1200, and would be easier to climb hills on. The extra gear at the front gives you another 3 gears lower than what the Trek provides.
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Postby gururug » Wed Apr 18, 2007 8:46 am

Bikes are very similar, I agree with a 105 groupset for this price range. It's hard to get stuck with a lemon. The most important thing is that you like the "feel" of the bike.

That said you can probrably save 200-450 by shopping around and brand variance.

I have an avanti giro running 105 (except for the FSA gossamer cranks) and am very happy with it.

One words of warning though. If you get a carbon seat post, you will need to take care not to overtighten as they are easy to sqhash/ crack
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Postby sal » Sun Apr 22, 2007 5:07 pm

Hi, I have purchased a 06 trek 1200 in the last 5 months and clocked up about 800km and LOVE IT(apart from the rims)!!! Am certainly no bike expert but like to spend my money wisely so after riding the OCR2, a Merida and the Trek, I felt comfortable with the ride and the bike shop where purchase was made.

People say that there is bling attached to a TREK but who cares. Purchased the bike at a great price and have good service from LBS.

The bike itself is a good frame, with a mix of Tigera and 105 RD. have purchased clipless shoe/pedal combo and computer, lights and a few tools to go with it, and of course nicks.

So in my humble oponion a TREK 1200 is a GREAT Bike for under $1400.00 - Good Luck :!:
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Postby MichaelB » Mon Apr 23, 2007 12:14 pm

sal wrote:Hi, I have purchased a 06 trek 1200 in the last 5 months and clocked up about 800km and LOVE IT(apart from the rims)!!!


What is the problems with the rims ?
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Postby Halfanewb » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:15 pm

sal wrote:People say that there is bling attached to a TREK but who cares.


nothing wrong with bling as long as one has some grunt :)
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