Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

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Aushiker
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Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance

Postby Aushiker » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:00 pm

G'day

I picked up Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance from the library this week for a look see and was wondering what (a) folks think of either book and (b) assuming worth getting, which one would be best given I have a dreaded flatbar :) and a MTB or should I get both?

From what I have seen they look well illustrated and easy to follow.

Thoughts?

Andrew
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thm
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Postby thm » Thu Jul 19, 2007 10:44 pm

I ordered a copy of Zinn from Amazon. I had a flick through it at my local Borders and it looked easy to follow, and pretty comprehensive. Also it has nothing but good reviews.

So if you feel like you lack knowledge on MTBs like I do, I think it's a worthwhile investment. It only cost I think 20 odd dollars on Amazon (not including postage) compared to RRP of $40 here.

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Postby sogood » Thu Jul 19, 2007 11:07 pm

Problem is, there are too many standards out there and each has their peculiar way of doing things.

I have found that with a combo of,

1) Park Tools site <http://www.parktool.com/repair/>
2) Sheldon Brown <http://www.sheldonbrown.com/>
3) PDF users manuals from component makers
4) Google/cycling forums

I have been able to gather information on everything I need to know, including a recent complete bike build. Personally, I think you are better to invest the money on specific tools. Some of them you can't do without if you wanted to do a particular job.
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jimbob
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Zinn

Postby jimbob » Fri Jul 20, 2007 7:42 am

I've found Zinn really useful. Since getting a MTB I've used Zinn to help me learn how to maintain the bike and now feel confident doing most things. It's helped me fix a number of issues on the bike plus point me in the right direction when upgrading components.

Yes, I agree that all the information is out there on the web but it's so much handier to have it all in one place and right next to you when you are tinkering. And Zinn seems to cater for most standards.

My only criticism is that the instructions are sometimes overly descriptive and you tend to lose some of the key information because you're not reading it all. Or perhaps that's just me!

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Postby alchemist » Fri Jul 20, 2007 9:23 am

I suspect you flat bar roadie has more in common with mtbs than roadies (trigger shifters & V or disk brake).

The other resource that can be found on the web is Barnett's Manual. It used to be available a chapter at the a time on Specialized's web site

triode12
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Postby triode12 » Fri Jul 20, 2007 11:49 am

I bought this book and it covers both MTBs and Road bikes.

It is very good and uses photos instead of drawings.

amazon linky

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Postby Mulger bill » Fri Jul 20, 2007 10:26 pm

I'm with Triode, it's a good reference.

The web will give you lots of info, but it's a bit hard lugging the PC into the shed. :wink:

Shaun
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sogood
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Postby sogood » Sat Jul 21, 2007 2:11 am

Mulger bill wrote:The web will give you lots of info, but it's a bit hard lugging the PC into the shed. :wink:

Fair point. Paper copy is more convenient. And I have had to read those PDF docs on my laptop by the workstand. The hard part has been trying to turn to another section or select another window with greasy hands. :?
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Postby alchemist » Sat Jul 21, 2007 6:30 am

Mulger bill wrote:The web will give you lots of info, but it's a bit hard lugging the PC into the shed. :wink:


Which is why I lug my bikes into the lounge room :wink:

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Postby Aushiker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 11:10 am

Thanks for all the comments. I will check out Borders in Singapore in a week or so and see what they have. Normally books are well priced in Singapore.

Regards
Andrew
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Postby Aushiker » Wed Aug 08, 2007 3:14 pm

An update. Based on the feedback I have ordered Zinn's mountain bike book from Amazon. Singapore price was around $40 Australian.

Thanks for all the feedback.

Andrew
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