chain breakers

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philip
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chain breakers

Postby philip » Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:39 am

So I'm ordering a new chain from wiggle and figure I'll need a chain breaker to install the new one, haven't done this before. They have two, a Park Tools one for ~$20 and a LifeLine one for ~$14. Are either of these what I need to do the job? The lifeline one looks like it'd be handy as it folds and would probably fit in a saddle bag for long rides, but I don't know much about the design and haven't heard of lifeline before. I know ParkTools make pretty good tools though.

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jasimon
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Re: chain breakers

Postby jasimon » Fri Jan 08, 2010 8:53 am

Yup - that's what you need. Reading the reviews I suspect either will work fine. I've used a Route7 one from Torpedo7 and it was fine. If you are putting an order in you might want to consider getting an extra chain and cassette too for your spares for next time (and a few quick links and maybe a chain whip and cassette remover if you don't have access to them). Even though my chain hadn't worn much when I replaced it - there was some skipping under load in a couple of gears that a new cassette fixed. Discovering this when you put a new chain on, and then having to wait for a replacement cassette to arrive could be annoying given how much you ride.

TheSkyMovesSideways
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Re: chain breakers

Postby TheSkyMovesSideways » Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:13 am

I've got a Topeak Super chain tool from Cell. Works pretty well, and the "chain hook" it comes with is extremely useful. Although if you bought a tool without such a hook, you could easily make one from a 10cm piece of clothes hanger wire. :lol:
- Dave

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philip
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Re: chain breakers

Postby philip » Fri Jan 08, 2010 9:31 am

Thanks, I went for the LifeLine one.. and a chain.. and a cassette.. and kmc links..and 4 tyres.. ahh.. wiggle.. you make it too easy to buy stuff.

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Aushiker
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Re: chain breakers

Postby Aushiker » Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:24 pm

TheSkyMovesSideways wrote:I've got a Topeak Super chain tool from Cell. Works pretty well, and the "chain hook" it comes with is extremely useful. Although if you bought a tool without such a hook, you could easily make one from a 10cm piece of clothes hanger wire. :lol:


Hi

I have one of these as well. Not a bad tool and as mentioned the chain hook is handy.

Andrew
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ve safari
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Re: chain breakers

Postby ve safari » Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:44 pm

What is this chain hook you speak of?
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TheSkyMovesSideways
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Re: chain breakers

Postby TheSkyMovesSideways » Fri Jan 08, 2010 1:47 pm

It's the piece of wire-like metal you can see running up over the top of the handle in the link I posted. Holds the chain in place while it's broken, making it much easier to install and remove when the rear wheel is in place (and the chain is tensioned).

Looks like this:
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ve safari
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Re: chain breakers

Postby ve safari » Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:02 pm

Lol, what a good idea. I've been using a chain breaker for years and never saw such a clip, would have saved me some grief! :oops:
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trailgumby
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Re: chain breakers

Postby trailgumby » Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:09 pm

I have a chainbreaker in my Topeak trail multitool. I've added a piece of spoke in the shape of that wire and yes it comes in very handy especially when it's cold and your fingers are numb. :P

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JV911
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Re: chain breakers

Postby JV911 » Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:12 pm

ve safari wrote:Lol, what a good idea. I've been using a chain breaker for years and never saw such a clip, would have saved me some grief! :oops:


+1!

</goes off to bend a piece of wire>
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twizzle
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Re: chain breakers

Postby twizzle » Fri Jan 08, 2010 2:20 pm

I've always used quick links. Last week when building the new bike I couldn't find where I'd put them, so went to use the chain breaker ("Pro" brand) to push a pin in for the first time. No joy - the pin wouldn't go all the way in and the amount of force I was putting on the chain breaker was way beyond what I though was safe. I gave up, and after a lot of searching found the spare quick links.

The only thing that didn't look right at the time was after pushing out the pin to shorten the chain, the two side plates on that link weren't parallel any more. Not something you want to screw up either - having the chain come apart when making serious power is likely to result in a stack.
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Bantam Roosta
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Re: chain breakers

Postby Bantam Roosta » Fri Jan 08, 2010 5:32 pm

philip wrote:So I'm ordering a new chain from wiggle and figure I'll need a chain breaker to install the new one, haven't done this before. They have two, a Park Tools one for ~$20...

I've got one of these. They are tiny. It would easily fit in my small saddle bag if I needed to take it with me.

I use quick links too. Thanks Twizzle for getting me on to those.
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Skexis
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Re: chain breakers

Postby Skexis » Sat Jan 09, 2010 1:11 am

philip wrote:....The lifeline one looks like it'd be handy as it folds and would probably fit in a saddle bag for long rides....

Would you need to carry a chain breaker anyway?

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il padrone
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Re: chain breakers

Postby il padrone » Sat Jan 09, 2010 9:38 am

The Park Chain Brute is an excellent tool for chain work on the road. Very well engineered. The driving pin goes all the way to the stop to break the chain without pushing the pin out. If it only had a screw in handle extension it would be the top tool for shop work also.
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philip
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Re: chain breakers

Postby philip » Sun Jan 10, 2010 6:33 pm

Skexis wrote:
philip wrote:....The lifeline one looks like it'd be handy as it folds and would probably fit in a saddle bag for long rides....

Would you need to carry a chain breaker anyway?

For long rides when you're riding places that are ages away from anywhere with not much traffic I think it's a good idea - I've been on a couple of rides where people have broken their chains and then they're pretty stuffed. From what I gather it's fine to fix it by taking the broken link out and get home with a slightly shorter chain.

brauluver
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Re: chain breakers

Postby brauluver » Sun Jan 10, 2010 7:35 pm

Image

+1 to this, I'v'e had one on loan from a buddy for over a year now, and he still hasn't asked for it back.Must remind him about it.

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Lark2004
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Re: chain breakers

Postby Lark2004 » Sun Jan 10, 2010 7:36 pm

philip wrote:
Skexis wrote:
philip wrote:....The lifeline one looks like it'd be handy as it folds and would probably fit in a saddle bag for long rides....

Would you need to carry a chain breaker anyway?

For long rides when you're riding places that are ages away from anywhere with not much traffic I think it's a good idea - I've been on a couple of rides where people have broken their chains and then they're pretty stuffed. From what I gather it's fine to fix it by taking the broken link out and get home with a slightly shorter chain.

+1

I've broken a chain just doing my work commute, and depending on which way I go, there isn't always a LBS nearby. If I didn't have a chainbreaker with me it wouldv'e been a long walk to get it fixed.....
Andrew

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Cranky Jim
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Re: chain breakers

Postby Cranky Jim » Sun Jan 10, 2010 8:07 pm

Me too. And it was a long walk home. Nothing worse than having a simply problem that could be fixed in a minute with a simple little tool that's five kilometres away. I have had one in my saddle bag ever since ... and never had cause to use since....naturally.

brauluver
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Re: chain breakers

Postby brauluver » Sun Jan 10, 2010 10:01 pm

[quote="Cranky Jim" I have had one in my saddle bag ever since ... and never had cause to use since....naturally.[/quote]

That's good ol Murphy. Don't carry it and you will need it, carry it and it will be excess baggage.
Thats why I carry 2 tubes with me.

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