Second hand bikes from 1970s

recurring
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 12:14 am

Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby recurring » Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:03 am

Hey there,

What are your thoughts on buying a second hand bike where the frame is about 30 years old, but all parts newish and in great condition? Bike been rebuilt basically. Is that risky considering it's hard to know the history of the frame?

I'm looking for a new flat bar road bike. Should I consider spending $700 on a second hand one, or up my budget to $1000 for a new one? I was thinking Scott Sub 20 (2009).

Thanks, first post, appreciate any comments.

Colin_T
Posts: 837
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 4:54 am
Location: Riverton, WA

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby Colin_T » Tue Jan 26, 2010 2:33 am

Howdee & Welcome :)

old frames can be full of rust and you don't know until you hit something and it breaks. If the bike has been kept indoors all its life, and never ridden in the rain, it might be ok. Personally I would get a newer bike with nmore gears.
Kicked a black cat? Sounds more like ran over one, backed over it, hunted down its mother and did the same.

User avatar
HappyHumber
Posts: 5017
Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 11:48 pm
Location: Perth, (S.o.R.) W.A.

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby HappyHumber » Tue Jan 26, 2010 3:16 am

+1 to Colins comments' in general.

Unless you know what you're looking at in detail $700 is a lot for an older bike. If you're keen to get riding on something reliable, and with some sort of warantee, set aside your spondoolies for something new. The $1K figure you're suggesting is reasonable enough.
- Kym
Infrequently reading & contributing these days. Still reachable by PM (email alerts) - dec 2016

User avatar
hartleymartin
Posts: 5153
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:56 pm
Location: Fairfield, NSW
Contact:

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby hartleymartin » Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:43 am

Unless you are paying for a seriously good semi-racer bicycle from the 1970's, $700 is way too much. It is more usual to be purchasing something of that age for not more than $200. If the bicycle has been stored indoors (garage, shed, etc) the frame is highly unlikely to be suffering severe corrosion. However, if it has been sitting against the back fence for 30 years, I'd be extremely wary. I bought such a bicycle for $20, and was lucky that it hadn't rusted so badly.

If you are going to part with $700 get something new.
Martin Christopher Hartley

http://raleightwenty.webs.com - the top web resource for the Raleigh Twenty

recurring
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 12:14 am

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby recurring » Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:59 pm

Thanks for all your advice. Think I'll go with a new bike.

User avatar
rkelsen
Posts: 4487
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:41 pm

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby rkelsen » Tue Jan 26, 2010 2:08 pm

recurring wrote:What are your thoughts on buying a second hand bike where the frame is about 30 years old, but all parts newish and in great condition?

Depends upon what it is. Is there a link to a photo or ad somewhere that you could post here?

recurring
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 12:14 am

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby recurring » Tue Jan 26, 2010 2:10 pm

I was going to check out this one:
http://melbourne.gumtree.com.au/c-Stuff ... Z181641220

The specs seem pretty great.

I think I'm going to end up with the Scott Sub 20.

User avatar
rkelsen
Posts: 4487
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:41 pm

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby rkelsen » Tue Jan 26, 2010 2:23 pm

If that's a genuine Hillman, then it doesn't look too bad for the money. Hillman Cycles are still in business over in Brunswick. Perhaps they can tell you what the frame is made from.

Don't forget that as an older bike, it will require more maintenance and probably won't be as comfortable as something newer.

User avatar
nickobec
Posts: 1850
Joined: Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:51 am
Location: Perth or 42km south as the singlespeed flies
Contact:

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby nickobec » Tue Jan 26, 2010 6:04 pm

rkelsen wrote:If that's a genuine Hillman, then it doesn't look too bad for the money.


I agree depending on the frame material and condition of frame and components (which sound good), it is not bad for the money. If I was in Melbourne and still looking for a classic Australian steel frame I would be tempted.

rkelsen wrote:Don't forget that as an older bike, it will require more maintenance and probably won't be as comfortable as something newer.


I disagree with the comfort bit, but totally agree about more maintenance and care. You will need to take much more time and care keeping 30+ years old parts in smooth running order than new components.

Plus there is performance, technology has improved in leaps and bounds brakes, gears, etc are far better now than 30 years ago.

It is like buying a classic 30 year old sports car and expecting it be as good as a current hot hatch. (on or off the track)

For a 1st bike (or only bike) steer clear of the classics. Buy a new or recently used model, more reliable, better performance, less maintenance and easy to get parts.

However, if you already had a bike or three, the Hillman could make a great addition to your (or my) stable. Well maintained and polished, ridden only on dry days with non hard charging friends, frequenting the cafe strips, this is the life a classic Australian bike like the Hillman deserves.

kukamunga
Posts: 3540
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 10:12 am
Location: 3166

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby kukamunga » Tue Jan 26, 2010 11:59 pm

I heard recently that the Hill's might be selling out of their Hillman business ?

User avatar
il padrone
Posts: 22931
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby il padrone » Wed Jan 27, 2010 12:50 am

Nice old bike. But too much moolah for a bike with SunTour Vx derailleurs (mid-range), basic Weinmann brakes with 'safety' levers and a frame without brazed-on brake cable guides. The frame lug-work and drop-outs don't look to be anything too special either, probably a low-mid-range frame. Definitely not a Reynolds.
Mandatory helmet law?
"An unjustified and unethical imposition on a healthy activity."

User avatar
ColinOldnCranky
Posts: 6002
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:58 pm

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby ColinOldnCranky » Wed Jan 27, 2010 11:18 am

Just an observation in view of Colin's early comments - steel bikes DO NOT rust other than the surface rust that shows through the paint (lessens the liklihood of being pinched :) ) . Aluminium might fail in the long term, plastics and so forth certainly are not for a life time. But normal steeel bike frames are. Even old 1930's bikes left outdoors on the farm for decades have full structural integrity. And the quality of steel and welding in bikes has improved greatly since the 1930's.

I recall a fellow engeering students project at my Uni where they had recovered some old bike frames in a couple of locations (salty coastal and farm/bush) for cutting up and testing and checking the welding/brazing - and the results were as expected.

(Yeah, I know,there will be some old clanker somewhere that was made in Korea before they had cracked industrial materials processing, but if you are silly enough to pay $700 for something that only ever retailed in the first place for $100 then you wouldn't be bright enough to have asked for advice here anyway.)

That being said, $700 for a bike will buy you a pretty decent new machine, even as others on their $12,000 Pinarellos etc idle past you on the daily commute. Then of course if you got a decent price on an up-market model you are familiar with, well...
Unchain yourself-Ride a unicycle
Image

User avatar
hartleymartin
Posts: 5153
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:56 pm
Location: Fairfield, NSW
Contact:

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby hartleymartin » Wed Jan 27, 2010 3:15 pm

Steel doesn't rust away like people would have you believe. Not that long ago I saw a bicycle that went by the brand "Rival" which is believed to have participated in the 1909 Sydney-Goulburn classic. A century-old bicycle - frame has been restored, but the steel was just fine.
Martin Christopher Hartley

http://raleightwenty.webs.com - the top web resource for the Raleigh Twenty

User avatar
Zynster
Posts: 1102
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 5:50 pm
Location: West End, Brisbane

Re: Second hand bikes from 1970s

Postby Zynster » Wed Jan 27, 2010 3:37 pm

Just for comparison's sake, I recently helped a friend by a bike. It was an 07 Masi alloy frame, carbon fork, 105 / Tiagra groupset and Askium Race wheels, all for $650. Much better deal than that Hillman.

If you really like the old steely look, this would be a better buy too.
Fausto Coppi Reparto Corse | Giant Farrago Cross

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users