Shoe - rRoad or MTB??

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Shoe - rRoad or MTB??

Postby CoffeeNut » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:23 pm

The Specialised shoes seem to fit my wide feet...

Wondering if the MTB shoe, with the recessed cleats which allow you to walk might be a good option for my road bike???

The shoe is a bit heavier, and the pedal is a different style - but are there any practical negative issues with this idea?
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by BNA » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:30 pm

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Postby europa » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:30 pm

None at all mate. I use the SPD cleats and they work well. Being able to walk and drive in the shoes is a bonus. Although some have had accidental releases, it has not happened to me. Unless you are an aggressive rider, SPD pedals and cleats will serve you well.

Crank Bros pedals are reported to offer greater security than the SPD system and can still be walked on. You may wish to consider them to.

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Postby sogood » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:30 pm

There are no CF soled MTB shoes (AFAIK).

I ride my road bike with MTB shoes. As you've noted, it allows me to walk or even run with some normality. It also has better grip on wet roads when stopping. I basically feel that these are more important than any style or trivial performance issue there may be.

At the end of the day, it's your personal choice. I run Crank Bros' Quattro pedals. This allows me to use either my MTB or commuter shoes. And should one day I decide to go with a traditional CF road shoe, the Quattro comes with a 3 bolt cleat setup that I can easy adapt.
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Postby Kalgrm » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:42 pm

Somebody does make a CF soled MTB shoe but I can't for the life of me remember who. The CF is to stiffen the sole but it's inside the rubber outer sole so you can't see it nor slip on it.

I also ride my 'bent in MTB shoes, for what that's worth.

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Postby CoffeeNut » Tue Aug 07, 2007 11:45 pm

Thanks guys.
The Crank Quatro looks to be about $200 a set??

The Specialised Comp MTB shoes require the smaller cleat system - I assume this is compatible with the Quatro?
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Postby Double-Gee » Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:03 am

Whilst discussing shoes and cleats, etc... How important is it to get a set 'professionally' fitted?
While currently being a newb, I do intend at some stage to change to cleated riding. Can you just buy the correct parts and adjust it until it all feels/looks correct, or is there a secret art to making all the correct adjustments? I intend to purchase shoes locally to ensure the correct fit, but would a LBS help you if you came in with your own pedals to fit?

So much to learn, and soooooo much more than just buying a pushy !!!!

I'm fairly sure that I will buy MTB shoes :Þ
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Postby timbo » Wed Aug 08, 2007 1:40 am

As a general rule of thumb (toe?), cleat adjustment should have the ball of the foot over the pedal axle. Professional bike fitters may move the cleat forward, backward or sideways depending on your individual foot sizing, but for starting out, just leave it at that. If you buy a pedal/shoe combination at the same time, your LBS should help you to set it up correctly.
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Postby sogood » Wed Aug 08, 2007 6:45 am

CoffeeNut wrote:The Crank Quatro looks to be about $200 a set??

The Specialised Comp MTB shoes require the smaller cleat system - I assume this is compatible with the Quatro?

Try eBay.

Essentially, MTB standard is with 2 bolts while road standard is with 3 bolts. Quattro comes with a premium CB cleat that fits the 2 bolts system directly and a pontoon adaptor that works with the 3 bolts system.
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Postby LuckyPierre » Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:39 am

Kalgrm wrote:Somebody does make a CF soled MTB shoe but I can't for the life of me remember who ...

If you're desperate for carbon, both Specialized and Louis Garneau make mtb shoes with carbon soles. It kind of defeats the 'mulit-use' nature that most people are looking for though, doesn't it?
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Postby CoffeeNut » Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:52 am

is the 2-bolt MTB system as robust as the 3-bolt system? The area of the connection to the shoe seems smaller - which would surely lead to more boot flex?

And also the connection to the pedal seems smaller, more central rather than a large front/rear connection.

I'm wondering about the reliability of the MTB clip for those high power situations......
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Postby europa » Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:52 am

Double-Gee wrote:Whilst discussing shoes and cleats, etc... How important is it to get a set 'professionally' fitted?


It depends on the fitting they're doing. If all they're doing is positioning the cleat under your foot, you can probably do that yourself though when you consider where your foot is, it might be easier to have someone help. However, the fitting that one of my local shops does also considers the way your ankle twists as you turn the pedals (pronation, etc). Your shoes are clamped in artificial pedals with pointers - one pointer is fixed to the pedal, the other to your shoe. As you turn the pedals, the pointer fixed to your shoe moves backwards and forwards with your ankle and the cleat is adjusted to make that movement even either side of the fixed pointer.

I think this is worth doing, but am not sure how much it's worth paying for - I got it as part of my bike purchase, my son had it done as part of buying new shoes and pedals plus piggy backing off my (then) recent bike and accessories purchase.

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Postby europa » Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:55 am

CoffeeNut wrote:I'm wondering about the reliability of the MTB clip for those high power situations......


Just how easy do you think mtb riding is? :D
Mate, the system is plenty strong enough. The differing requirements of mountain biking and road racing have resulted in different solutions to the same problem.

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Postby sogood » Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:00 am

LuckyPierre wrote:If you're desperate for carbon, both Specialized and Louis Garneau make mtb shoes with carbon soles. It kind of defeats the 'mulit-use' nature that most people are looking for though, doesn't it?

Ok, CF MTB shoes. :shock:

It does defeat the purpose but I guess it also depends on the particular type of MTB races involved. For those similar to cyclocross where the riders need to carry the bike, run through mud and obstacles, then definitely it would be a bad choice. But for other forms of races, the racers never get off their pedals. So I guess it makes sense to have some stiffer sole. However, given that Sidi and most other major brands' top of the line MTB shoe do not use CF, I guess there may be some diminishing return issues there.
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Postby sogood » Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:09 am

CoffeeNut wrote:I'm wondering about the reliability of the MTB clip for those high power situations......

There's a metal plate on the other side. Put it this way, if you can break the mounting on a good quality MTB shoe, you are well on your way to be a pro.

In high powered situations, one of the key concern is accidentally pulling out of the pedal, as seen in Mikebytes recent track accident. Shimano's SPD is known to be involved in a number of these as seen on forum reports. By reputation, it's not a good choice if that's your concern. Similar has also happened with road pedal designs especially if the cleats are worn. The recommendation there is to supplement with straps. With Crank Bros, the engagement actually tightens up when you try to lift away from the pedal. Unless the cleats are worn, theoretically you can't have an accidental unclip unless you turned your foot sideways.
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Postby mikesbytes » Wed Aug 08, 2007 11:00 am

Double-Gee wrote:Whilst discussing shoes and cleats, etc... How important is it to get a set 'professionally' fitted?
While currently being a newb, I do intend at some stage to change to cleated riding. Can you just buy the correct parts and adjust it until it all feels/looks correct, or is there a secret art to making all the correct adjustments? I intend to purchase shoes locally to ensure the correct fit, but would a LBS help you if you came in with your own pedals to fit?

So much to learn, and soooooo much more than just buying a pushy !!!!

I'm fairly sure that I will buy MTB shoes :Þ


Do you have any knee problems ?
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Postby Wanta-bike » Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:19 pm

I've been using me specialised mtb shoes since i got me mtb about 3 years ago - and they're still goin quite strong - but they are fair worn.... also use em with me road bike!

currently using crank bros candy pedals on both bikes

when i was mtb racing, found them (spesh mtb shoes) super - and now on the road, just pretty much used to the fit of the shoe and CB's 4 sided entry and wont prob get any other brand.
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Postby CoffeeNut » Wed Aug 08, 2007 10:28 pm

thanks for the advice guys - went for the Specialised MTB Comp shoe - perfect fit.

Now to ponder Shimano (hmm) or Crank Brothers...
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Postby Double-Gee » Thu Aug 09, 2007 12:01 am

mikesbytes wrote:
Double-Gee wrote:Whilst discussing shoes and cleats, etc... How important is it to get a set 'professionally' fitted?

Do you have any knee problems ?

Not that I know of. I gather a correct fitting is essential if you have any issues like knee or ankle problems?
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Postby mikesbytes » Thu Aug 09, 2007 8:00 am

Double-Gee wrote:
mikesbytes wrote:
Double-Gee wrote:Whilst discussing shoes and cleats, etc... How important is it to get a set 'professionally' fitted?

Do you have any knee problems ?

Not that I know of. I gather a correct fitting is essential if you have any issues like knee or ankle problems?


If you don't have any problems, you could fit them yourselves and have it reviewed by your more knowledgeable friends.

I was suppose to switch from red to black cleats on Monday night, but that was put on ice
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Postby Mulger bill » Thu Aug 09, 2007 8:43 pm

mikesbytes wrote:I was supposed to switch from red to black cleats on Monday night, but that was put on ice


Don't red cleats go faster? :wink:

Sorry, what's the difference?

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Postby mikesbytes » Thu Aug 09, 2007 9:26 pm

Mulger bill wrote:
mikesbytes wrote:I was supposed to switch from red to black cleats on Monday night, but that was put on ice


Don't red cleats go faster? :wink:

Sorry, what's the difference?

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Read cleats have 10% float
Grey cleats have 5% float
Black cleats have 0% float
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Postby Mulger bill » Thu Aug 09, 2007 9:32 pm

Thanks for that Mike.

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Postby Wanta-bike » Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:49 pm

Mulger bill wrote:Read cleats have 10% float
Grey cleats have 5% float
Black cleats have 0% float


sorry if i've missed something here, but are we talkin about shimano cleats?

as i've only had crank bros pedals w/either a 15 or 20 degree float
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Postby mikesbytes » Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:59 pm

Wanta-bike wrote:
Mulger bill wrote:Read cleats have 10% float
Grey cleats have 5% float
Black cleats have 0% float


sorry if i've missed something here, but are we talkin about shimano cleats?

as i've only had crank bros pedals w/either a 15 or 20 degree float


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Postby Wanta-bike » Sat Aug 11, 2007 12:05 am

man, how quick are the replies here?!?!?! :shock:

hehe

cheers thankee, as i'm after some new shoes + cleat combo....
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