Novice looking for a new road bike

Questions about purchasing bicycles and parts

Novice looking for a new road bike

Postby onanie » Thu Aug 16, 2007 4:22 pm

Hi,

I'm new to all this, and am thinking of getting a comfortable road bike for general fitness. I have done some preliminary research, and have basically decided on a few features that I'd like to have as a minimum, for a good entry price.

1. Carbon seat stays and carbon forks (or full carbon frame even)
2. More upright dropbar position if possible
3. Not too concerned about the other components really.

I am only 160cm and 45kg . The sequoia is no longer available in my region (melbourne), and while the Trek Pilot 2.1 seems to fit this description very well, it seems that it can be more expensive than even some full carbon frames from other brands.

Would anyone have any brand with models to suggest for me to look at? Thank you!
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by BNA » Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:30 pm

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Postby CoffeeNut » Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:30 pm

I just bought my son a Pilot 1.2 - carbon forks and 105 set - great value I thought - rides beautifully.
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Postby timbo » Thu Aug 16, 2007 6:51 pm

Giant's OCR range would suit the bill. They have a full carbon version and an alloy one with carbon seat-stays, but I believe the alloy model is going back to full alloy and carbon forks only next year. If the bikes handlebars feel too low for you when you purchase the bike, get the local bike shop to fit a stem with more angle on it to raise the bars to a comfortable level. Any respectable bike shop should do this as part odf setting you up for the bike at purchase time. As for components, your bike will probably come with Shimano Tiagra or 105 components, and these work admirably.
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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:23 pm

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Postby Mulger bill » Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:32 pm

G'Day onanie, welcome aboard :)

Nobody here'll be suprised when I agree with Timbo, my OCR2 2007 is alloy with carbon fork and seatpost and I found it more comfortable than the others I tested, but they were more race than comfort inclined.
The Tiagra gruppo is well good enough for me, I'll upgrade sooner or later.

Bnej runs the same bike with a Cf frame, no doubt he'll pop in to tell you how good it is too, and the steelies will prolly have a few words too. :wink:

Having said that, you really need to get in a few K's on more than one bike to be sure you've found THE bike for you, a $1500 bike you want to ride every day is way cheaper than an $800 unit that you only ride a few times a month 'cos it feels horrible under your bum.

Cheers

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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:40 pm

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Postby Mulger bill » Thu Aug 16, 2007 7:56 pm

No question there MG, pity it's a bit big for me. :roll: I know which one would be more comfortable.

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Postby onanie » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:05 pm

Thank you all for the quick responses! This does appear to be an active forum.

I do see your point MountGower, but I'm afraid I'm sold on the claimed comfort that the carbon goodies provide.

I will endeavour to check out as many bikes as is suggested here.
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Postby onanie » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:16 pm

Mulger bill wrote:a $1500 bike you want to ride every day is way cheaper than an $800 unit that you only ride a few times a month 'cos it feels horrible under your bum.


Thanks, a good friend of mine had a similar saying for me.

timbo wrote:They have a full carbon version and an alloy one with carbon seat-stays, but I believe the alloy model is going back to full alloy and carbon forks only next year


I'm wondering if they already changed the specs. giant-bicycles dot com/en-AU/bikes/road/1128/28923 There is no mention of carbon seat-stays :(
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Postby thomas_cho » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:21 pm

Okay let me go out on a limb here. The cervelo R3 has some of the thinest seat stays, yet its built for the paris-roubaix.

The seat stays on most bikes are generally the thinest in diameter.

I would gather ( perhaps incorrectly) that the least amount of stress goes through the seat stays. If that is the case, how does carbon seat stays contribute to comfort?

Any frame builder gurus around here?
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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:22 pm

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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:23 pm

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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 8:26 pm

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Postby Bnej » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:05 pm

Nothing wrong with wanting a nice carbon fibre composite frame. Nothing wrong with Tiagra running gear either. It's not as nice as higher end gear, but if the frame is good quality it will outlast any running gear you put on it.

I wouldn't try to build your own bike for your first bike. I think the good entry level bikes are the Giant OCR range, OCR 1 is decent I'd skip the 08 OCR 3. The Trek Pilot range if you want a more relaxed position, and try a Trek 1200 to compare the riding position.

Full carbon isn't everything, carbon frames differ just like alloy or steel frames do. You want a good quality frame, and if you're spending over $1500 go for at least Tiagra or 105 running gear.

Most importantly get the sizing and setup right.
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Postby onanie » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:05 pm

MountGower wrote:I actually don't have anything against carbon fibre per se. What I feel sure about is two fold. Carbon fibre represents bad value for money at the moment and cheap carbon is exactly that. You'll be doing 60kph on it at times.

People say old steel bikes are heavy. It's not because of the frames, it's the old wheels and components that make them heavier. An old 4130 cromo frame would be about 550grams heavier than a carbn frame. A Columbus Spirit (steel) frame is lighter than some CF frames. A 55cm frame is 1050 grams.

Have your carbon and love it, it's your bike, just don't let people tell you it's any sort of substitute for hubs, BB, pedals and tyres. As for ride quality, once you've ridden a quality steel frame, you'll never want to get off it. I've only ridden a CF frame once before. I spent more time looking at the rear tyre thinking it was flat than I would have liked to. I felt like I was riding an over cooked noodle. My Columbus SL frame is alive and kicking and that's how I feel when I ride it.

Good luck, it's all yours in the end and you have to feel good about it, not me or anyone else. At the end of the day I am really just the forum button pusher and it's not always as easy as it should be to figure out exactly where I'm coming from.

So don't forget to post some pictures of those Pinarello lugs when you get them home.


I appreciate your comments. Thank you :)
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Postby MountGower » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:16 pm

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Postby mikesbytes » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:23 pm

Bnej wrote:Most importantly get the sizing and setup right.


This is actually the most important part of the entire bike.
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Postby Kalgrm » Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:24 pm

MountGower wrote:In a sea of subjectivity, an objective truth you can sleep on tonight and live by tomorrow.

Man, that's profound! :lol:

(Think I'll quote you in my new sig .....)
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