NEWBIE needs “affordable” TOURING Bike???

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NEWBIE needs “affordable” TOURING Bike???

Postby Davekyn » Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:16 pm

NEWBIE needs “affordable” TOURING Bike.
Hi...I have been having so much fun with on old 80’s Sportsworld 10 speed racer, I fixed up; after saving it from the local tip that I have now decided I want to buy one for touring and fitness.
NO WAY can I afford $2000:00-$3000:00...I can respect those who have chosen to by such quality and impressive bikes...I simply don’t have that kind of cash...My wife is finding it hard enough to understand that I will spend $1000:00 on a push bike. If I can’t find a quality bike touring bike for around $1000:00, then I will simply stick with the one I fixed up from the dump.
Man, I am so stoked with cycling. I only started riding because I got shin splints from trying to loose weight to fast. After going on longer and longer rides I have now lost 10kg’s and my shins have healed nicely...although I am back into jogging, I just can’t give up cycling. I’ve still been doing a lot of country road trips and getting my son involved as well.
The sides of the roads can get pretty bumpy...especially when there is a lot of traffic that requires you to stay close on the edge for long periods. I find I’m always having to brace myself out of the seat with all my weight bearing down on the pedals in order to absorb the shock of it all. I don’t know much about touring bikes, but would they be based on a hybrid design at all?
I’m not sure what to tell you all...I am aiming at a body weight of 80kg or there abouts.
I will mostly want to travel as fast as I can on country roads taking as little as possible but still wanting to camp out for a few nights. I’ll be taking my kid at times as well once he is trained up to handle an overnighter. Road Bikes are far superior in my experience, but can get really bumpy at times out here in these parts with so many DAMN POT HOLES! & I find Mountain bike to slow for the distances I have been travelling. I guess like so many other hobbies, it’s hard to find a good all-rounder!
Any tips would be great...Once again...I appreciate that many of you have state of the art bikes and al that...Maybe once I played the filed for a few more years I may be able to justify more money, but at this stage I only have $1000:00 to work with. I am happy to put the extra effort in & maybe suffer a little more...
Where should I start looking for a touring bike? THANKYOU!
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by BNA » Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:57 pm

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Postby europa » Sun Aug 19, 2007 3:57 pm

G'day Dave,

Welcome to the nuthouse.

What exactly do you mean by a 'touring bike'? I ask this because of your comment about being based on hybrids. I know that if you go into a shop and ask for a 'touring bike', you'll be lead straight to the hybrids, yet flat bar bikes aren't necessarily the best choice for touring. Many of us prefer drop bar bikes.

Fuji and Mongoose both make drop bar touring bikes and they are usually down in your end of the market. I personally ride a Trek but that's up in the area you can't touch (boo to the missus). Surly make a couple of bikes that can do the job - the Crosscheck and the Long Haul Trucker.

Do search on this forum for Mongoose Randonneur - a few of us have them and all have been pleased with them.

Think about what you want to do and what you want to carry. Do you need a heavyweight tourer like the Long Haul Trucker, something that will drag tractors out of bogs and carry enough spares to repair them? If so, you are limiting your choices a bit. However, if you're only carrying relatively light loads, you can press other bikes into service.

Make sure that whatever you buy has lugs so you can mount a carrier. If you'll be carrying a lot, make sure you can fit a front carrier as well.

An alternative is to stick with the bike you have now. How well does it work? Do you like riding her? Is the frame a good fit? Is the frame sound? Just the frame. If so, make that the heart of your new bike. Treat yourself to a Brooks saddle. You can upgrade the wheels if needed. You can have the rear forks spread to take the modern gear sets. By carefully watching ebay, you can pick up everything you need at good prices and internet shops such as Probikekit and Chainreaction can make upgrading very affordable.

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
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Postby Davekyn » Sun Aug 19, 2007 5:00 pm

Well I don’t believe my luck! I just went into the shed to check out my frame. On closer inspection The Old girl is an 80’s Sportworld Tourer Delux...I’ll post some pic’s in a few days when my kid gets back from Dream world with my camera...I tried to put in some old pics but the site wont let me utill I have put in several more legitimet posts...oh well!
There seems to be a set of lugs (a section that bludges that resembles a thick washer embedded into the fork...Sorry I can find my camera) There is two on the front forks and the rear frame where it meets that wheel. I’m confident this is what you mean. (Will i be able to find carriers that are compatible with an old 80’s 10speed touring frame??? It also has a label boasting “Tungsten steel”?????? I guess this is old news now.
I have thought about what you have said. Thank you for your response! I intend to check all those points out that you have made and will also go to ebay as well. I think it would be very rewarding building on this old frame. I’ll also consider those bikes you have already mentioned.
So far without even knowing the frame was a touring one (so labled) I have been very happy with it’s speed and handling. I could probably even put larger tires on the wheels already on it. I guess I can learn to deal with only 10 gears...But will look into those online bike shops...does spreading the forks mean I will have to take it to a bike shop to do that...My mate has been helping me out with it (filling the crank casing/spokes/bearings and all that sort of thing...maybe he can help anyways...will ask him.
I’ll probably look at carrying a small tent/sleeping bag/cooking kit/small first aid kit/Binoculars (10X50...astronomy & terrestrial use)/phone/food/water/media content (Shortwave Radio/digi camera)small change of clothes/towel-soap-toothbrush-paste... I’ll probably consider smaller Bino’s but enjoy 10X50 for stargazing. I’ll get the smallest of everything I can in terms of camping gear and pack with space in mind. Anyways that’s the basics I guess...I could probably go a few days on such gear...refuelling at different towns as I go.
It certainly is exciting just planning this stuff out.[/img]
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Postby europa » Sun Aug 19, 2007 6:27 pm

Sounds like your frame is a winner.

The rear spacing issue. Your frame being a 10 speed, the rear fork probably has a spacing of 120mm. The 8, 9 and 10 speed setups use 130mm. You can spread the fork yourself, but it's risky and you can ruin the frame. It's not something a normal bike shop would attempt. However, a frame builder can and a proper frame builder will not only get it the right width, but will be able to align every thing ie, make sure the frame isn't twisted. It sounds scary but isn't if you give to a frame builder and not expensive.

You'll also need to think about wheels and brakes. It probably has 27" wheels and if you upgrade the wheels, you're best advised to go to 700c. Although 700c wheels are rated as 28", they're actually smaller because that '28"' measurement is to the outside of the tyre whereas the 27" measurement is to the rim - weird but true. There aren't any modifications needed in changing to 700c but you may have reach problems with your brakes (the rim being closer to the centre). Again, there are ways of getting around this.

The rest of it is simply bolting the right bits onto the right places.

Carriers will fit - there are a wide variety of carriers and most are adjustable. Non-problem really.

Depending on your touring, especially with telescopes and the like, a trailer might be the go. I've just bought a kiddie trailer to tow my dog around in. It's a heavy darned thing, but rolls okay. Mine cost me $150 on ebay and can carry a 40kg load. The beauty of it for you, would be that it can take odd shaped items. They fit onto any bike. Proper tourists use single wheeled trailers such as the BOB and that may be a direction for you to go.

A good touring bike starts with the frame - the rest is incidental. You might be on a winner there.

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
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Postby heavymetal » Sun Aug 19, 2007 8:41 pm

Welcome to the forums.

I'd stick with the Sportworld Tourer for a touring bike. I have a Mongoose Randonneur Alum Frame tourer. Like other people with this model, the rear wheel is a dud.

Trying to get parts in Australia for touring is a joke. Be prepared to have bike shops bring you out sets of touring wheels with 24 spokes :shock:

I've done frame spreading before. Out of 2, I wrecked one. I just did a third this week and from the string measurements, I got it right :D

You should be able to slowly build your touring bike up over time so that it is right. You may need to do a lot of Internet shopping to locate the parts though.

I'd stick with and ride your current bike and work out what needs changing. For a better ride on rough stuff, you could fit a suspension seat post. Wider tyres also make for a better ride. 27" stuff is still around in places if you look.

Kev.
There is only one BicycleWA.
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Postby Davekyn » Mon Aug 20, 2007 6:26 pm

Thanks heavymetal,
I intend to deck it out over time. Thanks for the tips. I intend to start off pretty much like you have said. I'm still riding for fittness at this stage :wink: but when I lose enough weight and have the cardio fitness, I'll be riding for fun just like you...cant wait. I'll stick to jogging to kep fit & go cycling to have fun. I have to admit though...Riding even for fun will keep you fit wether you like it or not...I am amazed at the cardio work out you can get from a bike.
Thanks again Dude :wink:
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