Newbie: road bike durability question

Questions about purchasing bicycles and parts

Newbie: road bike durability question

Postby froszlah » Mon Aug 20, 2007 12:15 am

i'm looking to invest on a road bike that will last many years. i am 19 now and my last bike was a mountain bike which i got 6 years ago.

Because i know nothing about roadies, 1 question:

Are road bikes durable enough for unsealed (but not muddy) tracks? or will it get wrecked?

I ride my current bike around the residential area and this park that has sealed and unsealed bike paths.
froszlah
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:58 pm

by BNA » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:18 am

BNA
 

Postby CoffeeNut » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:18 am

my wife's Apollo Verdict does this job beautifully.
Stronger than a road bike - lighter than a mtb.
CoffeeNut
 
Posts: 233
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 11:43 pm
Location: Toowoomba

Postby alchemist » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:29 am

Unless you build up something stupid-light they will be fine. If you're really worried about it get one of these

Image
http://www.dirtworks.com.au/newsite/con ... w/195/143/
alchemist
 
Posts: 822
Joined: Thu May 17, 2007 6:59 pm

Postby Bnej » Mon Aug 20, 2007 8:44 am

I've ridden on unsealed roads with my road bike, as long as there isn't deep sand or other junk to make you loose traction it should be okay. Just slow down a over any bumps. If it's still comfortable to ride it's unlikely to wreck the bike.
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby europa » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:19 am

My Trek often travels on gravel or dirt ... but it's steel and has decent, load carrying wheels.

The bottom end ally and carbon framed bikes should do the job without a problem. Frames these days have warrantees so that should 'protect' you anyway. If you find your wheels are having trouble, just get them rebuilt.

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby MountGower » Mon Aug 20, 2007 4:29 pm

k.m
Last edited by MountGower on Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
MountGower
 

Postby froszlah » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:00 pm

So are carbon frames strong enough?

I'm looking to get a Giant TCR C1 2007 or Giant TCR C0 2006 (i have a bit of money to burn).

If say, for example you hit a 15cm kerb (AT) 10-15kmph, will it be a

1) 1 hit kill
2) your bike barely survived (don't do it again)
3) hitting the kerb over and over again will wreck it in the long run
4) road bike can handle these hits.

Just want know how strong they are.
froszlah
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:58 pm

Postby Bnej » Mon Aug 20, 2007 9:21 pm

froszlah wrote:If say, for example you hit a 15cm kerb (AT) 10-15kmph, will it be a

1) 1 hit kill
2) your bike barely survived (don't do it again)
3) hitting the kerb over and over again will wreck it in the long run
4) road bike can handle these hits.

Just want know how strong they are.


Probably 2 or 3 depending on the bike, but really 5) Just don't do that. For a high end TCR you have light weight wheels and you will probably put a buckle in them, and possibly pinch-flat your tyres. This is not something you want to do with an expensive road bike where a wheel can cost $$$$.

If you want to do kerb hopping and so on, use a mountain bike. A road bike is designed for going fast and smooth. While you can ride one on good dirt roads, it's not optimal once it's off pavement.

If you're getting a TCR composite as your first road bike, treat it like your new born baby. It's a lot of money and it's worth looking after. The riding position and construction are not going to make MTB tricks fun or safe.

IF you want a general purpose, rugged, dirt/road bike, go for something like the Surly Cross-check, the Trek XO1 or the LeMond Poprad Disc. These are cyclocross bikes made for tough races with a mix of dirt, mud, and pavement.

IF on the other hand, you are looking at joining a riding club, possibly participating in races, doing regular long distance on-road rides, then go for a dedicated road bike - and keep your MTB for kerb hopping and bashing around the block.
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby froszlah » Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:12 pm

thx BNej and the rest

now i know the road bike's strength :lol:

i never intend to kerb hop, but i don't want to get depressed when the bike dies from a small bump or a knock (if it ever happens)

I will get a roadie soon that will be like the BMW of bikes (not the ferrari armstrong bike). willing to spend 3-4k, fairly light etc. that will last me for yonks
froszlah
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:58 pm

Postby Bnej » Mon Aug 20, 2007 10:24 pm

I have a OCR C3, which is a full composite frame & fork, and I have hit some potholes at speed, I've ridden it on really rough country road (pitted and cracked), and I've had one pretty unpleasant crash at about 30km/h into the back of another cyclist.

The crash caused minor buckling in both wheels which needed to be trued but didn't damage the frame or fork. Potholes etc are unpleasant but generally don't damage the bike (unless they are huge).

They are outdoor equipment designed to be used - used but not abused is the key here. Also the more expensive the racer you buy, the lighter the components will be and in some cases this can mean weaker too (they start putting weight limits on).
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby MountGower » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:10 pm

If
Last edited by MountGower on Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
MountGower
 

Postby MichaelB » Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:55 pm

froszlah wrote:If say, for example you hit a 15cm kerb (AT) 10-15kmph, will it be a



AoT and a trip to the doctors.
User avatar
MichaelB
 
Posts: 6824
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:29 am
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

Postby Mulger bill » Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:09 pm

MountGower wrote:If you want a strong bike that is all class today and will not be dated by time like the latest carbon gimmick when the new thermo plastic gimmicks arrive, then have a look at this or this.


I thought major makers had already looked at/tried and discarded thermoplastic frames about 5-6 years ago. IIRC GT was the big champion of the material?

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25654
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby MountGower » Wed Aug 22, 2007 7:45 am

They
Last edited by MountGower on Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
MountGower
 

Postby mikesbytes » Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:07 am

Each material has its pros and cons. The quality of frames is dependent on the frame designers ability to utilise the characteristics of the material.

Road bikes are generally much tougher nowadays than they were 30 years ago, however like any tool, you should use it for what its designed for and they are not designed for jumping curbs. Most people wouldn't use a chisel as a screwdriver.
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14769
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby Kalgrm » Wed Aug 22, 2007 9:33 am

MountGower wrote:It's about making people feel inferior on their current ride. It's about BS. It doesn't matter if thermo plastic is better or worse, it matter only about the ability of thermo plastic to replace carbon fibre in the shop front.

Yet another quotable quote! Is this from "Marketing 101" or "Advanced Marketing In The Real World"?

Cheers,
Graeme
Think outside the double triangle.
---------------------------------------
My web site: www.scenebyhird.com
---------------------------------------
The Bicycle Transportation Alliance
User avatar
Kalgrm
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 9236
Joined: Fri May 25, 2007 5:21 pm
Location: Spearwood, 9km SE of Fremantle, WA

Postby thomas_cho » Wed Aug 22, 2007 10:47 am

If you have money to burn, get the right bike for the right purpose. There is no do-it-all well bike that exists.

You already have a MTB, ride that on the dirt tracks.

You want to ride a road bike, well keep it on the roads. Its not so much the damage that you can do the bike, then the damage the bike can do to you. A compromise would be to get a cyclo-cross bike which can handle wider tyres.

What mikebyes said about each frame material has its pros and cons is true.

Regarding something that lasts for a long time, just how long is long? For some 5 years is long enuf for them to want something new. There are many people who still ride steel frames that are approaching 20 years old, or more. Then again, I still see people riding Giant Cadex frames (CF tubing), and these are 15 years old now?

I'd say at 19 you are thinking too far ahead ... just get the bike and ride it. In fact this being your first road bike, after riding for 6 mths you might then start to realise what you want in a road bike, and definitely catch the upgratitis bug. As you progress in your working career, and with more disposable income, its hard not to want to get something better.

To cut a long story short, the financially wise thing to do would be to buy something cheaper first, and for the second bike go all out to get something that will outlast your desires to upgrade.
thomas_cho
 
Posts: 1186
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 12:45 pm
Location: Canberra ACT

Postby MountGower » Wed Aug 22, 2007 5:08 pm

klj
Last edited by MountGower on Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
MountGower
 

Postby triode12 » Thu Aug 23, 2007 5:33 am

MountGower wrote:If you want a strong bike that is all class today and will not be dated by time like the latest carbon gimmick when the new thermo plastic gimmicks arrive, then have a look at this or this.


The Tecnos is beautiful but I feel the Sintesi is better value. The weight differece between the two frames is only 100g but the price difference is $300-500. Plus the Deccadacci tubing of the Tecnos lacks the cachet of the Sintesi's Columbus tubing. :mrgreen:
triode12
 
Posts: 472
Joined: Fri Jan 12, 2007 8:35 am
Location: Sydney


Return to Buying a bike / parts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit