Front Shock 80 mm versus 100 mm

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Front Shock 80 mm versus 100 mm

Postby Aushiker » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:10 pm

G'day

Next question for the MTB folks. I see references to 80 mm versus 100 mm travel and assume one is better than the other. Which is preferable and why?

I am looking at this in the context of a MTB for touring (panniers and/or pulling a BOB).

I also lock-out is ideal I guess.

Regards
Andrew
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by BNA » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:15 pm

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Postby Bnej » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:15 pm

For XC use 80mm should be all you need. I think some specify 100mm just because it's 20mm "more". I have a 100mm Dart 2 fork and I can't imagine what I'd have to do to hit the travel limit.

A lockout is handy if you are climbing out of the saddle, stops the fork from bobbing. Rebound adjust is fun to play with.

Air shocks are lighter than coil springs and are easier to adjust (less air = softer). Preload adjust is a must. Damping is a good thing because it makes it more "absorby" and less "bouncy".
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Postby Aushiker » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:22 pm

Thanks Bnej. One Felt I am looking at (Q920) has a Rock Shox Dart 3 shocks which have 80 mm of travel and turnkey lockout. These okay? I assume these are air shocks.

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Postby Mulger bill » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:23 pm

Yep, what he said :D

If you aint planning on going BIG, 80mm is fine for a hardtail.

Shaun
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Postby Mulger bill » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:31 pm

...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
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Postby Bnej » Wed Sep 19, 2007 7:32 pm

Aushiker wrote:Thanks Bnej. One Felt I am looking at (Q920) has a Rock Shox Dart 3 shocks which have 80 mm of travel and turnkey lockout. These okay? I assume these are air shocks.

Andrew


Yep, those are fine. The difference between a Turnkey and pop-loc remote lockout on Rock Shox is a turnkey requires you to lean down and turn the dial on the fork, while the remote has a lever on the bars to turn it on/off. I have a turnkey and find it easy to adjust while riding - if you are going to use it a lot I think you can add the remote yourself later.

I am pretty sure the Dart 3 is an oil-damped coil spring like the Dart 2 - there is nothing wrong with a coil spring, it's lower maintenance but a bit heavier. It's better than what I have and I have no complaints about mine.
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Postby MountGower » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:11 pm

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Postby alchemist » Wed Sep 19, 2007 8:30 pm

Same as the rear - reduces bob, useful on smooth sections of tracks particularly long fire trail climbs
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Postby Aushiker » Wed Sep 19, 2007 10:47 pm

Bnej wrote:I am pretty sure the Dart 3 is an oil-damped coil spring like the Dart 2 - there is nothing wrong with a coil spring, it's lower maintenance but a bit heavier. It's better than what I have and I have no complaints about mine.

Yes it is a oil-damped shock. I don't think at this price range for the bike I would get much better anyway unless I pay for a swap out. Would it be worth it?

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Postby Aushiker » Wed Sep 19, 2007 10:48 pm

Mulger bill wrote:If you aint planning on going BIG, 80mm is fine for a hardtail. Shaun

You talking MTBeese Shaun? Care to explain "BIG" please?

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Postby toolonglegs » Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:10 am

Aushiker wrote:
Mulger bill wrote:If you aint planning on going BIG, 80mm is fine for a hardtail. Shaun

You talking MTBeese Shaun? Care to explain "BIG" please?

Andrew


I think by big he means launching off the nearest cliff...not your body weight.Not much of a tourer myself but 80mm should be plenty,but if it is 100 it should be fine too.I have 125mm on my hardtail...mainly because I took them off my freeride bike and can't be bothered with putting them back to 100mm,plus that would mean reading the manual.I love lockout as I climb on the bar ends all the time and without it would be bouncing in the name of sillyness!.But on the road lock out would not be as important but if it is there take it.
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Postby alchemist » Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:49 am

If I was going "big" (for the small values of big I'm prepared to do) I'd like a bit more that 100mm. 150mm+ is nice.

For general trail riding 100 to 125 is the go. 80 to 100mm for racing.
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Postby Bnej » Thu Sep 20, 2007 12:02 pm

Aushiker wrote:Yes it is a oil-damped shock. I don't think at this price range for the bike I would get much better anyway unless I pay for a swap out. Would it be worth it?


No, they will be fine for your purposes. As you go into the lighter & fancier race shocks the maintenance requirements get bigger, and if you're using this for off road touring you should keep it simple.

If you are doing really long distance & remote areas you could consider a strong cro-mo rigid fork, which would also let you use front panniers. A nice big low pressure fat tyre absorbs a lot of bumps on it's own.
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Postby Mulger bill » Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:51 pm

Sorry Andrew, missed the touring reference :oops:

Rigid or 80mm probably, I wonder what Kev's thinking?

Shaun

Big? Coupla feet to flat I spose... depends on Richards' socks.
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