How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

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Rural Rider
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Rural Rider » Sun Feb 19, 2017 6:54 pm

singlespeedscott wrote:
Rural Rider wrote:Bike Sizing? Don't believe the manufacturers advice on Frame Size. I just went through this with all data and charts telling me that at 183cm tall, I am a size 58 Frame! Went to the Bike store and right away the Sales cat says ... 'Oh no you're not' ... in complete contradiction of what the Manufacturing Frame Data states. Turns out I was absolutely perfect for a 56 Frame size and one size smaller than what that very Bike Company stated I should be on. So bottom line ... if you can, go physically sit on the bike - you'll save yourself a lot of trouble.

RR.

56cm is a very small frame for a someone as tall as you. Do you have short legs for your height/

Out of interest was the bike already on the floor or did they order it in after sizing you up?



It's a question of how long is a piece of string I suppose - the stand over height for the 56 frame Specialized Allez is perfect for me and I am every bit 183cm tall. My legs are fine thanks ... I'm pretty sure I'm in fairly good proportion! ;-)

The Bike bought was on the Floor, but the funny thing is I went and got sized from a completely different Bike Shop before buying the Bike at another Bike shop where I knew they had a 56 Frame on Sale. Both of the Bike Shop owners completely independantly told me the exact same thing, that different manufacturers can have differences in Frame size between each other and sometimes betwen the models from memory. And it is quite right ... I fit this bike perfectly, nobody was trying to sell me a Bike that was too small ... I have another Bike at home that's a 58 Frame in that Style and it fits me just as well.

I don't make em ... I just ride em ...

RR
2017 Trek Emonda SL6
2016 Specialized Allez e5 Sport

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nickobec
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby nickobec » Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:25 pm

singlespeedscott wrote:56cm is a very small frame for a someone as tall as you. Do you have short legs for your height


I am the same height as the OP, 183cm, reasonable proportioned, slightly longer arms. Started out on a 58cm, bought a steel single speed 55cm and found out I was more comfortable and faster on that than my 58cm geared roadie.

Then accidentally bought a 53.5cm frame, was supposed to medium 55cm not a small 53.5cm frame. My bike fitter looked at the angles and gave up. Fitted a 130mm stem and it is my race bike, faster than any other, prefer the handling (it is an aggressive geometry) and it is fun to ride, even 150km.

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Rural Rider
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Rural Rider » Mon Feb 20, 2017 2:32 am

nickobec wrote:
singlespeedscott wrote:56cm is a very small frame for a someone as tall as you. Do you have short legs for your height


I am the same height as the OP, 183cm, reasonable proportioned, slightly longer arms. Started out on a 58cm, bought a steel single speed 55cm and found out I was more comfortable and faster on that than my 58cm geared roadie.

Then accidentally bought a 53.5cm frame, was supposed to medium 55cm not a small 53.5cm frame. My bike fitter looked at the angles and gave up. Fitted a 130mm stem and it is my race bike, faster than any other, prefer the handling (it is an aggressive geometry) and it is fun to ride, even 150km.



Hasn't Mark Cavendish gone to a smaller Bike Frame recently also?

RR
2017 Trek Emonda SL6
2016 Specialized Allez e5 Sport

Death_defying
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Death_defying » Sun Mar 05, 2017 11:11 pm

Im 183cm exactly, and 56cm on my giant fits me perfect. My riding buddy has a tarmac, also 56cm. Hes 182cm....

TheWall
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby TheWall » Mon Mar 06, 2017 8:19 pm

No surprise...I am 192cm and comfortably ride the 58cm in the Tarmac.

cjamescj
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Joined: Thu Mar 16, 2017 6:58 pm

Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby cjamescj » Thu Mar 16, 2017 7:17 pm

Hi,
It's time to replace my bike and I don't know what geo type it is.

Question:
Is the Scott Speedster S3 a race geometry (say Giant TCR, Trek Madone/Emonda), or is it more relaxed (like a Giant Defy, Trek Domane)?

Background:
A recent service led into a conversation with the mechanic that I was onto my third wheelset. I have worn through two sets of Mavic Krysim Elite (2007) braking surfaces and he suggested I get a new frame. Apparently aluminium frames should be replaces >40,000kms, which that frame has done - I'm open to opinions on that 40,000km statement.

I have a Scott Speedster S3 (2005) 61cm (XXL) frame with Shimano 105 175mm cranks, drops, 7 degrees 90mm stem, running a moderate amount of post and 25mm tires.

Scott Speedster S3 link here. http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/Bike ... 3+27-speed.

I've also been advised that Specialized and Cannondale (I also have a 61cm Cannondale Slice that is a good fit) are the two main manufactures to make frames in my size (the mechanic said he couldn't honestly fit me on any bikes he sold) - opinions on that are welcomed too.

Much appreciated in advance,

Thank you

Vanny
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Vanny » Sun Apr 02, 2017 10:45 pm

I am in the same boat at the moment. My current frame (Giant Propel) is killing my back due to having back issues. I went to my LBS to talk them about getting a new frame and they advised me to get a proper bike fit from a physio before doing anything to determine the required geometry.

mp1988
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby mp1988 » Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:45 am

I'm 183cm (6'0") and I just got a 56cm framed roadie - initially I was looking at a 58cm one as that's what my hybrid is.

The shop then recommended a 56cm frame for a roadie, for my height as they're a different geometry from hybrids.

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snafuspyramid
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby snafuspyramid » Sun Jul 23, 2017 2:57 pm

Height is not very useful in determining frame size. The relative length of your legs (inseam), torso and arms can be very different among people of the same height.

As well as your basic physical dimensions, your level of function affects fit just as much, particularly your flexibility, especially in your posterior chain (broadly, glutes, back and hamstrings). Hip flexibility also matters. For instance, as the video notes, whether you can easily touch your toes will affect your ideal frame geometry a lot.

Your level of fitness matters enormously too. Do you have good core strength - for instance, can you hold a bridge for 60 seconds without too much trouble? And what about cardio and leg strength - how much power will you put down on the pedals? Are your neck and shoulder muscles accustomed to the additional strain in a more bent over position?

If you're a very strong rider with a good core you'll be much more comfortable, all other things being equal, in a lower more stretched out position, because the action of your legs will tend to support your upper body. Riders who aren't as strong - or who aren't interested in riding a particular bike hard - will prefer a more upright position, to allow more of their body weight to be borne by their buttocks on the saddle and to take some strain off their neck and shoulders.

Although not necessary to select a frame size (so probably a bit OT), your lateral fit - how your feet and hands connect with the bike - matters too. The angle at which your feet meet the pedals, the respective height of each pedal (i.e. whether shims are needed), the fore/aft position of your cleats and - perhaps more controversially - the distance between your feet (Petersen's "q factor") all depend on your particular dimensions, degree of flexibility and functional strength. There's also saddle selection, which similarly depends on individual morphology (pelvis width) and how aggressive your overall position is. These play just as much of a role in preventing overuse injuries and pain as frame size. Then there's the joys of handlebar shapes and sizes...

The point I'm getting to is that a professional fitting is usually money well spent. Once you've got a good ballpark on the key parameters, you can transfer them to new bikes readily (particularly stack / reach) and have a good base for adjustment as your fitness and flexibility improve.

On the other hand, this is an internet forum, so there's a tendency to thrash fairly basic questions to within an inch of their life. Your body has an enormous capacity to compensate for asymmetries, weaknesses or suboptimal fit. It's only where you ride enough to overcome this capacity that fitting becomes critical - so like most bike related pedantry, the more you ride, the more it matters.

If you're just looking for a bike to get around, lose some weight or do the occasional weekend warrior - and you're not dropping a huge chunk of change - near enough is good enough. Find a bike shop that will let you try out a variety of different bikes on a trainer, maybe try some of the online fit calculators for a rough guide, then err on the side of a more upright position (longer head tube / shorter effective top tube).

You'll not regret buying a bike that you can make more aggressive by dropping a few handlebar spacers or just using the drops, but you'll definitely regret buying a bike that's too aggressive. (Incidentally, I love the endurance bike concept, which as far as I can tell is about selling people bikes that aren't cripplingly uncomfortable for unconditioned riders but still look and cost like race bikes).

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Derny Driver
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Derny Driver » Sun Jul 23, 2017 3:29 pm

Death_defying wrote:Im 183cm exactly, and 56cm on my giant fits me perfect. My riding buddy has a tarmac, also 56cm. Hes 182cm....

My son is 183 and rides a 56 road bike and track bike.
As for bike fit, I use the method my dad taught me.
Just look at the rider sitting on it.
Ive been asked on half a dozen occasions who did my son's bike fit. One ex Pro said out of 200 guys at my club, my son is the only one who looks perfect on the bike.
But he was using the old fashioned method too. The eyes have it ;)

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foo on patrol
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby foo on patrol » Sun Jul 23, 2017 4:19 pm

That's very true DD. I went to get a fit and the bloke did all the things for the fit and said, nope you don't need any changes and he said in the 10yrs that he'd been doing bike fits, I was only the second bloke that he didn't have to touch. On his FB page he posted that up, with the following comment. Well I had only the second bloke in 10yrs of fitting that I didn't need to adjust anything with and guess what, he was an old school rider. :lol:

There has been only one bike that I couldn't get set up on in my life and that was a Fuji 2.0 Track frame and that was because I listened to everyone saying...... The trend is to go for smaller frames now, unlike when you were racing back in the 70/80s. Well guess what, I changed that frame for a bigger one and even before I could fine tune the set up, I felt better. :mrgreen:

Foo
I don't suffer fools easily and so long as you have done your best,you should have no regrets.
Goal 6000km
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Derny Driver
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Re: How To Choose The Correct Size Of Road Bike Frame

Postby Derny Driver » Sun Jul 23, 2017 5:05 pm

foo on patrol wrote:That's very true DD. I went to get a fit and the bloke did all the things for the fit and said, nope you don't need any changes and he said in the 10yrs that he'd been doing bike fits, I was only the second bloke that he didn't have to touch. On his FB page he posted that up, with the following comment. Well I had only the second bloke in 10yrs of fitting that I didn't need to adjust anything with and guess what, he was an old school rider. :lol:
Foo

Very cool mate. Love it :D

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