Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

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StevOz
Posts: 127
Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 6:37 pm
Location: Dunsborough, WA.

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby StevOz » Fri Oct 30, 2015 8:26 pm

chandu wrote:hi everyone

I am planning to buy a bike for commute and fitness

I am planning to spend 700 dollars and I have researched some of the bikes available on the market they are

trek fx 7.2
trek duosport 8.2
Gaint crosscity 2

please help me with which bike in the above is good to fit my purpose and if possible suggest bikes from other manufacturers in that price bracket.


This is an alternative option worthy of consideration.

http://australia.fujibikes.com/bike/det ... solute-21-

Realsteel056
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Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2015 8:11 am

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Realsteel056 » Tue Nov 24, 2015 8:30 am

Hi everyone.

I am a newbie to the cycling world and havent ridden a bike for a good 15 years- i have done a few times here and there during holidays. I have spent the last 12 months improving my health and fitness and getting a bit bored of running so i want to take up cycling purely as a fitness thing. I plan to ride on mostly on bike paths and i have had a look and there are fairly decent bike paths around the neighborhood. The plan is to take it slow and do 10-20kms intitally, building experience and confidence and then take on longer routes - 30-50km and hopefully one day be able to do more than that >50-100km....

I have read this forum and i must say there is a lot of rich information here from experienced cyclists and it has really been helpful. I did go down to the local shop and had a look and plan to go down to a few more shops later this weekend to see a few more bikes and try them out. During my first visit to the local bike shop, I was recommended a hybrid bike based on what i told salesperson. this is one that they had on sale and i did like the look and feel of the bike.

https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/urban ... /102666642

My budget is $500 which i gather is not a lot given generally you might need to spend a little more to get a more decent bike. I am happy to stretch it a little more if required and i was wondering if someone would be able to assist me by giving their opinion on the bike above or recommend me something else which i can check out this weekend around the same price range.

I would really appreciate some assistance and i am really out of my depth and i am reading and trying my best to educate myself. Thanks

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rodneycc
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Location: Melbourne Eastern Suburbs, Victoria

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby rodneycc » Tue Nov 24, 2015 1:28 pm

Start a new Thread mate.. This thread is a "sticky" mainly for info... Cheers.
2013 BMC TM SLR01;2013/14 Bianchi Inf CV
2013 Lynskey Helix;2013 XACD Ti Di2
2013 Giant TCR Adv SL1;2014 Giant Defy Adv SL

Realsteel056
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2015 8:11 am

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Realsteel056 » Tue Nov 24, 2015 2:04 pm

Thanks, i have created a new thread. My apologies for putting this in the wrong spot.

Pawen
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 5:18 pm

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Pawen » Tue Apr 12, 2016 5:32 pm

Thanks , useful advice for new riders, like me.

rp
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Mar 09, 2009 5:04 pm

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby rp » Sat Dec 24, 2016 4:35 pm

Hi all

I currently have a giant defy 2 from 2009 which I have ridden hard. It still works but it might be time soon for an upgrade. It has Sora components.
I am looking to get an upgrade to 105 components. The new Defy 1 I saw has disc brakes - does this discount the roadbike aspect in peoples view? Does it make the bike a cyclo-cross bike rather than a pure road bike?

I do the occasional weekend ride and don't want to be laughed at!

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Defy The Odds
Posts: 273
Joined: Thu Jun 18, 2015 12:00 am

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Defy The Odds » Tue Jan 10, 2017 12:16 am

rp wrote:Hi all

I currently have a giant defy 2 from 2009 which I have ridden hard. It still works but it might be time soon for an upgrade. It has Sora components.
I am looking to get an upgrade to 105 components. The new Defy 1 I saw has disc brakes - does this discount the roadbike aspect in peoples view? Does it make the bike a cyclo-cross bike rather than a pure road bike?

I do the occasional weekend ride and don't want to be laughed at!



There are disc versions on just about every model from just about every manufacturer these days. Discs are becoming more popular and I would hardly say they discount the roadbike image.

In any case, who cares what others think as long as you are comfortable. I am sure when I started riding beach road in my Anaconda jersey that I was laughed at but I didn't care because I enjoyed myself.

Get what you like, ride it and enjoy it !

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Rural Rider
Posts: 206
Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2014 12:41 am
Location: NSW

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Rural Rider » Thu Feb 09, 2017 11:23 pm

This may have already been stated ... I'm not going to wade through 9 pages to find it, so here it is ... Bike Sizing? Don't believe the manufacturers advice on Frame Size. I just went through this with all data and charts telling me that at 183cm tall, I am a size 58 Frame! Went to the Bike store and right away the Sales cat says ... 'Oh no you're not' ... in complete contradiction of what the Manufacturing Frame Data states. Turns out I was absolutely perfect for a 56 Frame size and one size smaller than what that very Bike Company stated I should be on. So bottom line ... if you can, go physically sit on the bike - you'll save yourself a lot of trouble.

RR.
2017 Trek Emonda SL6
2016 Specialized Allez e5 Sport

TomSenke
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Apr 17, 2017 4:57 pm

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby TomSenke » Wed Apr 19, 2017 12:52 am

I have tested the carbon bike, they have a good range, and for all sales now!
Bought carbonbikekits.com. They also have a tool that can help the size of a selection box.

Nooby1980
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:31 pm

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Nooby1980 » Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:37 pm

Hi I'm wanting to start riding a bike to and from work (total distance there and back is approx 18km), for fitness and weightloss mainly. I'm 194cm tall and weigh 125kg.

I can't afford to spend more than $400 at the moment, and was looking at this bike: http://www.cellbikes.com.au/Totem-Swift?custcol1=51

Any suggestions, or opinions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks

RobertL
Posts: 336
Joined: Wed Feb 17, 2016 3:08 pm
Location: Brisbane

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby RobertL » Fri Jul 28, 2017 2:12 pm

Nooby1980 wrote:Hi I'm wanting to start riding a bike to and from work (total distance there and back is approx 18km), for fitness and weightloss mainly. I'm 194cm tall and weigh 125kg.

I can't afford to spend more than $400 at the moment, and was looking at this bike: http://www.cellbikes.com.au/Totem-Swift?custcol1=51

Any suggestions, or opinions would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks



Looks like a decent bike for the price. Go for it!

Kronos
Posts: 58
Joined: Mon Oct 16, 2017 6:36 pm

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Kronos » Sun Nov 05, 2017 8:18 pm

Realsteel056 wrote:Hi everyone.

I am a newbie to the cycling world and havent ridden a bike for a good 15 years- i have done a few times here and there during holidays. I have spent the last 12 months improving my health and fitness and getting a bit bored of running so i want to take up cycling purely as a fitness thing. I plan to ride on mostly on bike paths and i have had a look and there are fairly decent bike paths around the neighborhood. The plan is to take it slow and do 10-20kms intitally, building experience and confidence and then take on longer routes - 30-50km and hopefully one day be able to do more than that >50-100km....


This is all well and good but for anyone being off a bike for 15 years (myself included at one point) doing 10-20km is probably the limits of starting out. I'd also suggest a bike with a wide range cassette so that you have an easier gear. There's almost nothing worse with riding than reaching a 15% gradient hill starting out and then realising you don't have a gear to attack the climb your up against. You don't want to be "that guy" that's dropped and is now walking up the hill. "How embarrassment"

I have read this forum and i must say there is a lot of rich information here from experienced cyclists and it has really been helpful. I did go down to the local shop and had a look and plan to go down to a few more shops later this weekend to see a few more bikes and try them out. During my first visit to the local bike shop, I was recommended a hybrid bike based on what i told salesperson. this is one that they had on sale and i did like the look and feel of the bike.


It is possible to build a nice bike with $500. My steel steed is a Giant Kronos, with a SRAM Rival, SRAM Apex Derailleur and SRAM double tap shifters. I also have a Thomson Elite seat post and am waiting on a Nitto quill stem. Get to know "a mate" that can look out for you or even hand you down their old groupset if its "a bit worn" and they're suffering from upgraditis. It matters not what your bike is made out of when you're beginning its all about the fitment of the bike.

Get your fitment and gear right and you will have a bike you will want to ride every day. There are even some classic modern aluminum road bikes these days such as a CAAD5, or Giant TCR, etc that will fit in a $500 price bracket which are practically modern bikes for most intents and purposes. Know your size, and get someone who knows what they're doing to fit it for you.

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