First road bike recommendations?

Dudeman
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First road bike recommendations?

Postby Dudeman » Thu Aug 31, 2017 12:39 pm

Hi all,

I'm looking at buying my first road bike soon. Currently I've been riding my Giant Roam 0 which is good for what I want it for, but I want to start going for longer rides and be able to ride faster. I wanted to start with an entry level bike, preferably under $1000 or not much more over. I've been looking at either the Trek 1.1 (Or the new version, Domane AL 2 which is coming to my LBS soon), or the Giant Contend.

Has anyone got any thoughts on these two bikes, or does anyone have any recommendations for the best entry level options for this price range? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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rodneycc
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby rodneycc » Thu Aug 31, 2017 3:54 pm

I Like the look of the Contend SL's. Mububban did a great review of his recent below...

viewtopic.php?f=9&t=92977

Also a little cheaper is the Reid Vantage Endurance 2.0 which is worth a look.

If you didn't want to go discs there is a few other options. There had a great sale on Carbon framed Boardman at Amart Sports a little while ago in the specials thread, not sure if its still going. The higher end Polygons are also not bad for the coin. The Cannondale CAAD12 is probably the best Alu framed bike around but you will pay for it.

If you can raise the budget the Giant Defy Advanced is a bike that ticks a lot of boxes (even if you can grab one second hand).

Anyway get out there and test ride a few and the eventual winner will raise its head from the pack.
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Mububban
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Mububban » Thu Aug 31, 2017 4:59 pm

Dudeman wrote:Has anyone got any thoughts on these two bikes, or does anyone have any recommendations for the best entry level options for this price range? Any help would be greatly appreciated!



On a general note, if you believe you'll enjoy it (and you will, trust me :) then there's a very real chance that you'll want to upgrade again in very quick time to something $2000 or beyond.

If you're already enjoying cycling on the Roam, have a base level of fitness, and believe you'll stick with the road bike then my advice would be 1) go test ride several bikes of different styles (racey, endurance, rim brake vs disc brake) and feel the big smile hit your face like I got the first time, and 2) think about how much you could spend if you saved up for a little while longer.

Gumtree is full of bikes in pristine condition that got bought and never ridden, but seeing as you're already riding, it might be safe to spend a bit more.

I spent $1500 (budgeted $2000, got a deal) and almost immediately started dreaming about upgrading because I love it so much, after spending the first 35 years of my life on mountain bikes :D If I'd had my time again I probably would have saved up and spent $2500 on something with better wheels etc. Live and learn!
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby ForkinGreat » Thu Aug 31, 2017 5:39 pm

Budget of $2000 could get you a decent bike. ($2500 even better :) )

I recommend whatever bike you get to have:
11spd rear derailleur
50-34 Compact chainrings for better climbing
11-32 rear 11spd cassette (again, for better climbing)
Disc Brakes, preferably hydraulic (rim braking in the wet can be scary)
If the bike has disc brakes, you should be able to run wider (more comfortable) tyres than a rim brake bike, and maybe even fenders to keep water and road grime off you.
Drop bars, especially if you want to ride for distance. They allow variation in hand position to
A carbon frame is not necessary, and costs more than Aluminium, generally.
I would suggest Shimano SPD MTB pedals eg 540, and MTB XC shoes. - for their versatility. easier to get off the bike and walk around without slipping over.

Also, if you aren't racing, maybe go for an endurance/gran fondo style geometry. slightly more upright, slightly slacker geometry for more stable handling.

Go for a brand with a decent warranty.

Go to a decent shop whose staff will fit you properly, and not just try to sell you a bike because they happen to have it in stock.
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby ForkinGreat » Sat Sep 02, 2017 1:31 pm

https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/road- ... /102996838

Endurance/Gran Fondo Geometry
Carbon frame
Shimano Hydraulic disc brakes
Full Shimano 105 drivetrain
50-34 cranks
11-32 cassette/cogs
:D :D :D
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Sat Sep 02, 2017 8:01 pm

https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/road-bikes/giant/nsw/sutherland/defy-2/102738127

At that price point it's sort of hard to go wrong with Giant.

Here's a clearance Giant Defy2 (Tiagra). Only problem is we don't know where....
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby nickobec » Sat Sep 02, 2017 10:08 pm

A lot of what ForkinGreat said is subjective and opinion does vary on most of the issues

ForkinGreat wrote:Budget of $2000 could get you a decent bike. ($2500 even better :) )

Spend as much as you can afford, but put $500 or so aside for helmet, shoes, pedals, jersey, shorts, gloves etc.

ForkinGreat wrote:I recommend whatever bike you get to have:
11spd rear derailleur

Buy a bike with 11 speed drivetrain if you can afford it, it future proofs your drivetrain for upgrades. If you can't afford 11 speed and end up with 10 speed Tiagra or a second hand 10 speed set up, it is not the end of the world. It just means it is more expensive to upgrade to 11 speed as you need to do it all at once, shifters, rear derailleur, chain, cassette at the same time. I just bought my 1st 11 speed bike and happily swap between 10 and 11 speed without noticing the difference.

ForkinGreat wrote:50-34 Compact chainrings for better climbing

If you are heavy, unfit and ride hills then compact chain rings are a good choice. The lighter you are, the fitter you are and the less hills you ride, the less you need a compact chain ring.

ForkinGreat wrote:11-32 rear 11spd cassette (again, for better climbing)

See comments above, plus a rear cassette this size requires a specialist rear derailleur. I am a poor climber for my weight 85kg, yet I can climb for 2km at 10% or 6km at 5% using using 53/39 11-28 combination.

ForkinGreat wrote:Disc Brakes, preferably hydraulic (rim braking in the wet can be scary)

Disagree, I happily ride down a hill at over 70kph in the wet in a race with rim brakes on carbon wheels knowing I can and will stop at the end. I know how my brakes work and how to use the effectively. That said I would not do the same speed if there was driveways were cars could pull out, even if I had hydraulic discs.

ForkinGreat wrote:If the bike has disc brakes, you should be able to run wider (more comfortable) tyres than a rim brake bike, and maybe even fenders to keep water and road grime off you.

+1 for wider tyres for comfort, but there is cut off point with weight (same with fenders) heavy the bike, the harder it is to climb.

ForkinGreat wrote:Drop bars, especially if you want to ride for distance. They allow variation in hand position to

Big fan of drop bars here. Flat bars are for riders, who feel more comfortable sitting upright with better vision and control in high traffic. Get a little confidence on a drop bar and you will not look back.

ForkinGreat wrote:A carbon frame is not necessary, and costs more than Aluminium, generally.

A good quality aluminium, carbon or steel frame is much better than a poor quality aluminium, carbon or steel frame. Do not worry about the material, worry about the fit, the ride and how it feels to you. I have aluminium, carbon or steel framed bikes, tyre choice and tyre pressure have far more impact on ride quality than frame material. That said my latest bike is an aluminium framed out and out race bike, could of easily got a very good carbon fibre bike for the price, but I wanted aluminium.

ForkinGreat wrote:I would suggest Shimano SPD MTB pedals eg 540, and MTB XC shoes. - for their versatility. easier to get off the bike and walk around without slipping over.

Strongly disagree, you get clipless pedals for more control and pedalling efficiency. Nothing wrong with flats or clips for short distances.

You get XC style pedals and shoes if you are getting off the bike and clambering up hills or over objects.

If you are riding decent distances, get road pedals and shoes, they are more efficient and less likely to subject your feet to "hot foot".

The problem with XC style shoes and pedals is the small contact area. This dramatically increases the chance of "hot foot". Nothing like being 50 kilometres from home and you have a burning sensation in the middle of your foot or both feet. Which is when I switched.

ForkinGreat wrote:Also, if you aren't racing, maybe go for an endurance/gran fondo style geometry. slightly more upright, slightly slacker geometry for more stable handling.


Bike geometry varies from the outright endurance to aggressive race, you need to pick the right geometry for you now. You need to pick a bike you are comfortable on and a bike you want to ride. That probably means endurance geometry as a new rider and over time you might change. Having an endurance geometry bike, does mean you can't race it, lots of people start racing endurance geometry bikes. Just like it means you can't take your race geometry bike on a long ride. Most of my long rides (150kms+) have been on my race bike, because that is the bike I ride distances on, even if it has race geometry.

Best bit of advice I can give, test ride as many bikes as possible and buy the bike that makes you want to ride the most.

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Zippy7 » Sun Sep 03, 2017 8:09 am

+1 on test riding bikes.

Try to find a shop that will let you go for a decent ride (say 30mins+). My local specialized shop not only let me test ride for an 1hr down to Lane Cove National Park, they extended it for my next morning ride up to Akuna Bay. I was glad, because I found out that bike wasn't really what I wanted.

edit: Get something you like, but also accept the fact that you may come under the influence of upgraditis :)
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby ForkinGreat » Sun Sep 03, 2017 4:45 pm

nickobec wrote:A lot of what ForkinGreat said is subjective and opinion does vary on most of the issues

Likewise with some of what you are suggesting.

ForkinGreat wrote:Budget of $2000 could get you a decent bike. ($2500 even better :) )

Spend as much as you can afford, but put $500 or so aside for helmet, shoes, pedals, jersey, shorts, gloves etc.

I Agree with that

ForkinGreat wrote:I recommend whatever bike you get to have:
11spd rear derailleur

Buy a bike with 11 speed drivetrain if you can afford it, it future proofs your drivetrain for upgrades. If you can't afford 11 speed and end up with 10 speed Tiagra or a second hand 10 speed set up, it is not the end of the world. It just means it is more expensive to upgrade to 11 speed as you need to do it all at once, shifters, rear derailleur, chain, cassette at the same time. I just bought my 1st 11 speed bike and happily swap between 10 and 11 speed without noticing the difference.

I would agree with that as well

ForkinGreat wrote:50-34 Compact chainrings for better climbing

If you are heavy, unfit and ride hills then compact chain rings are a good choice. The lighter you are, the fitter you are and the less hills you ride, the less you need a compact chain ring.

For the majority of people, compact chainrings will be a good choice

ForkinGreat wrote:11-32 rear 11spd cassette (again, for better climbing)

See comments above, plus a rear cassette this size requires a specialist rear derailleur. I am a poor climber for my weight 85kg, yet I can climb for 2km at 10% or 6km at 5% using using 53/39 11-28 combination.

That's fine for you, but not necessarily for other people. having a bailout gear can be really handy if struggling on a climb


ForkinGreat wrote:Disc Brakes, preferably hydraulic (rim braking in the wet can be scary)

Disagree, I happily ride down a hill at over 70kph in the wet in a race with rim brakes on carbon wheels knowing I can and will stop at the end. I know how my brakes work and how to use the effectively. That said I would not do the same speed if there was driveways were cars could pull out, even if I had hydraulic discs.

LOL wet descending at 70kph with carbon rims and rim brakes. Good luck with that. Also, Try googling - Carbon wheel delamination. https://www.google.com.au/search?q=carbon+wheels+delamination&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj1mZessojWAhXFWrwKHU0ED8QQsAQIJw&biw=1728&bih=810&dpr=1.11

ForkinGreat wrote:If the bike has disc brakes, you should be able to run wider (more comfortable) tyres than a rim brake bike, and maybe even fenders to keep water and road grime off you.

+1 for wider tyres for comfort, but there is cut off point with weight (same with fenders) heavy the bike, the harder it is to climb.

Only a problem for the weight weenies and racers, in my opinion. You can spend thousands getting a superlight frame and parts, but getting fitter and stronger is much more to the point than having a featherweight bike

ForkinGreat wrote:Drop bars, especially if you want to ride for distance. They allow variation in hand position to

Big fan of drop bars here. Flat bars are for riders, who feel more comfortable sitting upright with better vision and control in high traffic. Get a little confidence on a drop bar and you will not look back.

At least we agree on that


ForkinGreat wrote:A carbon frame is not necessary, and costs more than Aluminium, generally.

A good quality aluminium, carbon or steel frame is much better than a poor quality aluminium, carbon or steel frame. Do not worry about the material, worry about the fit, the ride and how it feels to you. I have aluminium, carbon or steel framed bikes, tyre choice and tyre pressure have far more impact on ride quality than frame material. That said my latest bike is an aluminium framed out and out race bike, could of easily got a very good carbon fibre bike for the price, but I wanted aluminium.

I agree with that. It's the quality of the frame, not just the material.

ForkinGreat wrote:I would suggest Shimano SPD MTB pedals eg 540, and MTB XC shoes. - for their versatility. easier to get off the bike and walk around without slipping over.

Strongly disagree, you get clipless pedals for more control and pedalling efficiency. Nothing wrong with flats or clips for short distances.

You get XC style pedals and shoes if you are getting off the bike and clambering up hills or over objects.

If you are riding decent distances, get road pedals and shoes, they are more efficient and less likely to subject your feet to "hot foot".

The problem with XC style shoes and pedals is the small contact area. This dramatically increases the chance of "hot foot". Nothing like being 50 kilometres from home and you have a burning sensation in the middle of your foot or both feet. Which is when I switched.

That may be your experience and common thinking in your bike racing club. Not necessarily the case for everyone else.

I've used XC pedals (Shimano SPD & Time Alium) for years, with Shimano and Specialized XC clipless shoes. No hot foot. If you are getting hot foot, then there may be fit issues with the shoes and/or you may need some sort of insole to correct that. many available off the shelf.
I also have Speedplay Zero pedals and Specialized carbon sole clipless road shoes. maybe the road shoes are a bit stiffer, but comfort wise there is little difference. Shoes that are too stiff can cause foot problems just as overly flexible shoes can.


ForkinGreat wrote:Also, if you aren't racing, maybe go for an endurance/gran fondo style geometry. slightly more upright, slightly slacker geometry for more stable handling.


Bike geometry varies from the outright endurance to aggressive race, you need to pick the right geometry for you now. You need to pick a bike you are comfortable on and a bike you want to ride. That probably means endurance geometry as a new rider and over time you might change. Having an endurance geometry bike, does mean you can't race it, lots of people start racing endurance geometry bikes. Just like it means you can't take your race geometry bike on a long ride. Most of my long rides (150kms+) have been on my race bike, because that is the bike I ride distances on, even if it has race geometry.

Of course you can race on an Endurance geometry frame. What I was suggesting is that a Race geometry frame might be a little twitchy in the handling for some riders.

Best bit of advice I can give, test ride as many bikes as possible and buy the bike that makes you want to ride the most.

Again, I agree with that.

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby nickobec » Sun Sep 03, 2017 7:24 pm

ForkinGreat wrote:
nickobec wrote:A lot of what ForkinGreat said is subjective and opinion does vary on most of the issues


Neither of us are helping the OP (original poster) by posting opinions on features that may or may not be relevant.

We don't know their bike riding background, their level of fitness or what type of riding they want to do.

So the best we can do is provide generic advice, of work out your budget, put a few hundred aside for helmet, shoes, shorts, pedals etc. Test ride lots of bikes and by the bike that makes you want to ride.

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby ForkinGreat » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:19 pm

nickobec wrote:
ForkinGreat wrote:
nickobec wrote:A lot of what ForkinGreat said is subjective and opinion does vary on most of the issues


Neither of us are helping the OP (original poster) by posting opinions on features that may or may not be relevant.

We don't know their bike riding background, their level of fitness or what type of riding they want to do.

So the best we can do is provide generic advice, of work out your budget, put a few hundred aside for helmet, shoes, shorts, pedals etc. Test ride lots of bikes and by the bike that makes you want to ride.


Yep, agreed. Dudeman's main constraint would be budget. by his post, he's not wanting to spend more than around $1000.

Dudeman's Roam is a Hardtail MTB with disc brakes and flat bars, the bikes he mentioned are both drop bar road bikes.

Trek 1.1 and Domane AL2. For the money, $1000 or under, I like the look and spec of the Domane AL2 better. Carbon fork with Trek's ISO speed damper & specced with 700x28c tyres (as opposed to the 1.1's 700x23c tyres).

https://www.trekbikes.com/au/en_AU/bike ... 0000-2018/

worth noting that Trek says that
"The only thing to keep in mind is if you are upgrading to Shimano's latest 105 system (11 speed), then you will also need to purchase a new rear wheel that is compatible with 11 speed cassettes."
I suspect it's the same for the trek 1.1

A drop bar road bike specced with at least 10spd rear cassette/drivetrain would/should allow Dudeman to change over to an 11spd drivetrain in future, if he wants to. if he was able to stretch the budget a bit more, then he could certainly get a good bike which could allow him possibilities to fit upgrades if desired.
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Duck! » Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:37 pm

Cassettes with a 32T sprocket are pretty useless if the biggest hill in one's area is a speed hump. Plus, the OE spec cassette, whatever size it is, is hardly a deal-breaker as it's an easliy replaceable part. Big gear range = big holes in the middle, where you'd really want gears to be in all but the steepest terrain.

Contrary to popular belief, in most cases a 32T does not require a special derailleur; sprocket clearance is dictated by the upper body length of the derailleur, not the cage length; the cgae just gives a bit of chain length insurance. Shimano use the same upper body for both short and long versions of their derailleurs, so if a model series is compatible with x sprocket size, either derailler will do it (by the same measure if a series is limited to a 28T for example, even the long version will still only fit a 28, but will go with a triple-ring crank), however caution should be exercised with some gear selections. SRAM on the other hand use completely different derailleurs for 28> or 32T compatibility.

Upgrading from 10-sp. to 11-sp. is not that hard with current-spec Tiagra; the derailleurs work on the same cable pull ratio (therefore incompatible with other 10-sp.) but with shifters being the expensive part of the equation it's still not cheap. But all you need is shifters, cassette, and chain, providing the wheel (which most do these days) will fit the cassette.
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby G@v » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:43 am

The new Domane AL 2 has a slacker headtube and longer chainstay which means a longer wheelbase than the Trek 1.1. So a bit more comfortable and as previously mentioned 700x28 tyres are a nice inclusion. Probably easier to adjust to coming from the Roam.

The Domane AL2 has 24 spoke wheels front and back so possibly not so strong and could go out of true. The Trek 1.1 has 32 spoke wheels front and back.

The base model 2018 Giant Contend and 2018 Trek have the new Shimano Claris shifters. They are different to 2017 models as the cable from the shifter runs along the handlebar just like the higher spec shifters in Shimano's range. So much nicer than the 2017 models that have Claris shifters. No cables to get in the way of your front light.

The 2017 Trek 1.1 should be on sale now for $750.

The Cannondale Synapse is a good buy for a first road bike. You can get last years Sora model for $800. https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/road-bikes/cannondale/vic/docklands/synapse-sora/102994956

The Norco Valence is another nice beginners road bike. $900. Would be great for long distance rides.
http://www.99bikes.com.au/norco-valence-a-sora-black-red-2017

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Dudeman » Sun Sep 17, 2017 2:33 pm

Thanks for all the comments and advice guys. Ive decided I want to spend a bit more but absolutely $2000 is my limit (not including accessories) definitively want drop bars, I'm not fit compared to a lot of cyclists and no where near as fit as I was a few years ago but I'm training quite hard on my indoor trainer and zwift daily and am getting fitter fast, and I want to get really fit and cycling is something I love and am committed to now. I mainly want to go for rides 1-3 hours, no interest in crazy long hours, I'm sure when I get fitter I'd like to do more hill climbs.

Any suggestions on bikes around $1500-$2000? I like the the Giant Contend SL Disc bikes and would like to try one, no idea what other options would be good in that price range, any more advice appreciated.

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Dudeman » Sun Sep 17, 2017 3:47 pm

Now that I think about it, maybe I'll allow a bit more, budget $2500 for a bike

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby CaffeineAU » Mon Sep 25, 2017 11:13 am

ForkinGreat wrote:https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/road-bikes/giant/vic/hallam/defy-advanced-2/102996838

Endurance/Gran Fondo Geometry
Carbon frame
Shimano Hydraulic disc brakes
Full Shimano 105 drivetrain
50-34 cranks
11-32 cassette/cogs
:D :D :D


I have had mine for just over a month now (2017 Defy Advanced 2) and I absolutely love it. I'm coming from MTBs so the more upright position feels more natural to me. I'm also 2m tall, so finding a suitable sized bike was a bit of a challenge. (most places said yes, we can order one but it may take a few weeks/months whereas I wanted instant gratification ;) )

Unfortunately, after 330km of road and bike path, mostly with the local bike shop weekend rides, the frame cracked. So I'm currently waiting on a replacement frame. Hoping Giant can find one, as I'd prefer not to have the lime green 2018 frame :shock:

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby Mububban » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:25 pm

CaffeineAU wrote:I have had mine for just over a month now (2017 Defy Advanced 2) and I absolutely love it. I'm coming from MTBs so the more upright position feels more natural to me. I'm also 2m tall, so finding a suitable sized bike was a bit of a challenge. (most places said yes, we can order one but it may take a few weeks/months whereas I wanted instant gratification ;) )

Unfortunately, after 330km of road and bike path, mostly with the local bike shop weekend rides, the frame cracked. So I'm currently waiting on a replacement frame. Hoping Giant can find one, as I'd prefer not to have the lime green 2018 frame :shock:


Lime green is awesome :D

Does the Defy max out at an XL frame?

Where did the frame crack?
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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby CaffeineAU » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:55 pm

Mububban wrote:Lime green is awesome :D

Does the Defy max out at an XL frame?

Where did the frame crack?


But I just bought matching shoes, pedals, helmet, jersey and knicks! I wouldn't match anymore! :oops:

Yes, XL is the largest available.

Cracked clean through the seat tube. Above the bidon mounts, below the seat post insertion. There's about 30mm of seat post available before I meet minimum insertion.

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Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby g-boaf » Tue Sep 26, 2017 9:09 am

nickobec wrote:
ForkinGreat wrote:50-34 Compact chainrings for better climbing

If you are heavy, unfit and ride hills then compact chain rings are a good choice. The lighter you are, the fitter you are and the less hills you ride, the less you need a compact chain ring.

ForkinGreat wrote:11-32 rear 11spd cassette (again, for better climbing)

See comments above, plus a rear cassette this size requires a specialist rear derailleur. I am a poor climber for my weight 85kg, yet I can climb for 2km at 10% or 6km at 5% using using 53/39 11-28 combination.

ForkinGreat wrote:Disc Brakes, preferably hydraulic (rim braking in the wet can be scary)

Disagree, I happily ride down a hill at over 70kph in the wet in a race with rim brakes on carbon wheels knowing I can and will stop at the end. I know how my brakes work and how to use the effectively. That said I would not do the same speed if there was driveways were cars could pull out, even if I had hydraulic discs.

ForkinGreat wrote:If the bike has disc brakes, you should be able to run wider (more comfortable) tyres than a rim brake bike, and maybe even fenders to keep water and road grime off you.

+1 for wider tyres for comfort, but there is cut off point with weight (same with fenders) heavy the bike, the harder it is to climb.


I'll agree and disagree with some of those points.

I saw many extremely fit riders recently using 50-34/52-36 and 11-28/11-32 combinations. These guys were lean as anything and very fast (as quick or better than NRS level). 2km at 10% and 6km at 5% isn't all that bad.

We had to face things like 13.3km at 9% with bits greater than 15% and many sections more than 10%. I remember Passo Lavaze was also a bugger of a thing, it had some very steep sections, the climb up to Plancios was also tough.

You definitely don't want 53-39 for those, and even for normal riding around the our cities here the 50-34 won't cause too much bother. 52-36 and 11-25 would be a good combination for most riding, and then fit an 11-30 or 11-32 for those times that you need such a cassette. I'd get the a new bike built up with those big cassettes in mind, even if you won't use them right away. It'll save money for later down the track.

I also agree that you don't need disc brakes for riding in the wet. I was on big (and steep) descents in very heavy rain and didn't have any problems. I had Dura Ace brakes, Swisstop blue pads and some regular alloy wheels. Didn't miss having carbon wheels either. I had solid, dependable braking all the time even from high speeds. Certainly had a lot of heavy braking for sharp corners and hairpin bends from high speeds.

The 25mm GP4000s II tyres were excellent the whole time, running at 80-85psi. No punctures and good grip all the time.

So I would certainly go for a compact or mid compact setup, use one of the medium cage rear derailleurs and go 11-25 cassette for normal riding in Australia. Then if you go overseas and ride in those huge mountains, then you can go for 11-30 or 11-32. Disc brakes not necessary.

st27
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue May 16, 2017 8:11 am

Re: First road bike recommendations?

Postby st27 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 2:27 pm

Dudeman wrote:Now that I think about it, maybe I'll allow a bit more, budget $2500 for a bike


I was in the same bought as you back in May this year. I had a starting budget of $2k-$3k. I was looking at bikes with 105 and carbon if possible.
I ended with Giant Contend 1 which I picked up for $850 from LBS.
I've clock up 1300km since and enjoying every bit of it. I've upgraded to clipless pedals and shoe which was a big preformance upgrade and currently looking for wheel upgrade. I am happy that I didn't spend that $2k or $2.5k with my first bike because you have to decide if you will like this sport after 3 months. If you happen to fall in love with it like I do now, I am looking at $5k aero bikes which I can't afford and saving for. Well anyways that is my story, I've been joining friendly group rides and consistently getting dropped by them. Always good to train with lower spec bike so when you upgrade everything is EASIER I hope and its not to embarrassing to get dropped when you are riding an entry level bike.

HTH

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