Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

pomcycle
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2017 5:59 pm

Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby pomcycle » Sat Sep 23, 2017 6:12 pm

Hi all, I hope this finds you well...

I'm new to this world, so please pardon any naiveté on my part. I'm looking for a bike that's both suitable for suburban commuting but durable enough to withstand a planned Tasmanian coastal road trip (in the New Year). Does such a thing exist? If so, any information/advice would be gratefully received. :-)

It's worth noting that although I have enough funds to buy a more than capable machine, I wouldn't like to break the bank just yet being in the infancy of my cycling experience an' all...

Thank you kindly in advance,

Josh

User avatar
Thoglette
Posts: 3255
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2009 1:01 pm

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby Thoglette » Sat Sep 23, 2017 7:49 pm

pomcycle wrote:I'm new to this world, so please pardon any naiveté on my part. I'm looking for a bike that's both suitable for suburban commuting but durable enough to withstand a planned Tasmanian coastal road trip (in the New Year). Does such a thing exist? If so, any information/advice would be gratefully received. :-)


On one hand the easy answer is "Gemini Randonneur" (I commute on a mid eighties model) but they are quite expensive new.

Basically, anything with fat tyres (32mm+); mudguards and a few "braze ons" is the (too) short answer .

Any "touring bike" will work as a commuter but you can also tour on a cheap and cheerful bike. My standard answer here is the very cheap Reid Classic roadster but it's not going to be particularly hill friendly with a load. The normal "flat bar" city bikes would fit the bill - but I'd get rid of the flat bar for something with at least a hint of sweep back (your wrists will thank you).

If all you need to carry is a credit card then you can tour and commute on a roadie (with fatter tyres and a backpack).

The perfect answer would be a used but well loved touring bike.
Stop handing them the stick! - Dave Moulton
"People are worthy of respect, ideas are not." Peter Ellerton, UQ

User avatar
Tim
Posts: 1788
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 5:02 pm
Location: Gippsland Lakes

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby Tim » Sat Sep 23, 2017 8:14 pm

Thoglette wrote:On one hand the easy answer is "Gemini Randonneur" (I commute on a mid eighties model) but they are quite expensive new.


Nowadays called a Vivente World Randonneur in it's various guises;
https://viventebikes.com/

I have an earlier 2012 model, toured about 8000km's on it and commuted for 12 months.
They are relatively heavy steel framed touring bikes built tough. I can't fault mine.
The price has crept up in recent years ($1000 more than I paid for mine) but comparatively cheap lined up against the latest and lightest of carbon fibre creations.
I think they are still one of the best value complete-package touring/commuting bikes.
There are a number of members of this forum riding VWR's and I recall only one whinge.

User avatar
DavidS
Posts: 2304
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:24 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby DavidS » Sun Sep 24, 2017 1:10 am

I have an Allegro T1 and commute as well as doing a few long rides (Amy's Gran Frondo, Around the Bay). Likely similar to the Vivente above, steel frame, drop bars. It does have bar end shifters to cater for V brakes which may put some off, but I find them easy enough to use. I run 28mm tyres which suit me but 32mm is an option. Has mudguards and came with a rack for a pannier. 2 chainwheels and 10 speed cassette gives me the gears I want but the Vivente's have triple chainwheels which may suit better.

You can see them here: https://diggari.com.au/allegro/ but there's no listing of where to buy them, I got mine at StKilda Bikes in Barkly St.

DS
Image

Cannondale Quick Speed 2, Allegro T1

User avatar
bychosis
Posts: 5045
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Lake Macquarie

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby bychosis » Sun Sep 24, 2017 5:48 am

Depending on your commute, you can pretty much commute on anything. A comfortable touring bike will make a comfortable commuting bike, but possibly a bit slower than another option. Take off you racks and extras and you'll still have a comfortable ride with a bit of weight loss.

You might consider a really cheap commuter option if you don't like commuting on a slower tourer. I have commuted on an old steel road bike that cost me about $100 initially. Also commuted on MTB, MTB with slicks, fixed gear, and now a nice flat bar disc brake roadie - but I've got a relatively flat 6k commute, so a slow bike only adds a minute or two.
bychosis (bahy-koh-sis): A mental disorder of delusions indicating impaired contact with a reality of no bicycles.

brumby33
Posts: 438
Joined: Fri Sep 27, 2013 10:52 pm
Location: Beverly Hills NSW...Yeehaaaaa!!

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby brumby33 » Sun Sep 24, 2017 12:12 pm

+1 on the Vivente World Randonneur....

I've always believed " you gets what you paid for" approach to most things in life, that includes my 3 Weber BBQs, I know that investing in quality, will save me grief later on.
Not trying to be snobby or anything but investing in a quality machine will last you many years of enjoyment and not something you'll ever want to chuck on the roadside rubbish tip in a few short years...and I've seen many bikes dumped on the side of pavements awaiting to be picked up and disposed of and some of them not so old either.

The Vivente is a bike you'll keep pretty much for life until you can't peddle anymore, it's designed as a world worthy tourer, it's also a great commuter and has everything already on it you'll ever need like dyno hub powered lights that can also charge your mobile batteries (as long as you don't have the location thing on) full front and rear mudguards, most of them now have Hydraulic disc brakes except the Deccan which has mech discs but STi brake and gear combo set. It even has a Tubus rear rack with eyelets on the forks to fit front racks.
A full Double butted steal frame is a joy to ride.
I don't really find it heavy, weighs 14 kilos without my bags or water bottles....but that weight also makes the bike ride well on the road. Also comes with Schwalbe Marathon puncture resistant tyres with car type valves.
Compared to many racing style bikes on the market today, the Vivente is pretty cheap with all the gear it's got..at $2749 I think that is value. Best of all, it's been designed by an Australian bicycle tourer who's been in the bike game for many decades.
Anyway...my 10 cents worth for consideration :D

Cheers

brumby33
"ya gotta hold ya mouth right"

VWR -2013

User avatar
Duck!
Expert
Posts: 6343
Joined: Tue May 21, 2013 8:21 pm
Location: On The Tools

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby Duck! » Tue Sep 26, 2017 10:45 pm

bychosis wrote:Depending on your commute, you can pretty much commute on anything.

Pretty much this. There is no such beast as a specific "commuter" bike; different riders will have different features that they deem important for a commuter, so the "ideal" bike is very much a personal choice. Buy something with the touring aspect in front of mind, and in all probability it will also be a thoroughly acceptable commuter.
I had a thought, but it got run over as it crossed my mind.

V-meister
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2017 4:09 pm

Re: Bike suitable for commute and for a long road trip?

Postby V-meister » Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:02 pm

I recently picked up a Giant Toughroad which is proving to be an awesome commuter (for me anyways!). I know a bunch of people buy these as touring bikes. However, it's a flat bar, but I think they came out with a drop bar version this year too.

Awesome flat bar gravel/commuter for my current purposes. Enjoying it much more than my previous road bike as it just suits my style of riding at present.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users