Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

fauziozi
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Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Sun Dec 10, 2017 1:39 pm

Hi all,

Just the background on what the bike is used for:
- commute from kew east to inner cbd (VIC). Google map says its a 16.3km ride through koonung creek trail, main yarra trail, then the state routes.
- I'm 162cm 90kg. So aim is also to lose weight. I've gained 20 kgs in the past 3 years, need to shred these fats!

The company I work for has a 5% discount on Reid cycle purchases, so I thought I'd have a look. My last purchase was for commuting to uni, and I just grab one from Kmart which I later sold for $80.

I dropped by Cecil Walker Cycles Melbourne whilst on the way to Reid. The customer service was great, the staff was friendly. Was recommended a range of $600 giant bike and a $350 vintage bike after I told them I thought I'd spent maximum of $500 on bikes. The giant bike was a lot lighter compared to the vintage bike, though from my amateur senses for everyday use, I can live with that weight difference very easily. If I was about to purchase it right there and then, I'd take the vintage bike.
I also asked about if I should get a bike with suspension, and the staff recommended no because it'd be more expensive, and add 1.5kg worth of weight. I took pictures of the 2 bike, said thanks, and off to Reid cycle.

Spent about 10 minutes unattended at Reid cycle as all staff were occupied. Told them what I needed for and the budget I had in mind, I was shown the $450 Urban x1 https://www.reidcycles.com.au/urban-x1.html size: small, then was offered a test ride around the block. It was the lightest bike I've ridden (not that I've tested a lot of bike) and it was real easy to ride.

Then I asked if I can test ride a bike with suspension, which then I was shown their $350 MTB Pro Disc size: Medium. After the first test ride, I told them the suspension was too strong I could not feel it, and I had problem when switching gears 1 to 2.The switch got stuck, which then I had to forced it into gear 3, then back down to gear 2. The staff then flip a switch at the suspension, and said that the cables on the gearing wasn't installed properly (was talking to his colleague who then said "it wasn't me"). Anyway, I'm sure they'll sort that gear problem out -- then off I go with a second try on that bike.
It was a heavier bike, but not as heavy as my last bike -- and I liked the suspension for the comfort it gives. It is about the same weight as the vintage bike shown in Cecil Walker Cycles Melbourne.

The staff doesn't recommend me to have a bike with suspension as well because he said the power will be dampened by the suspension giving a slower ride.

I then asked to testride their cheapest ride, which was the $330 Urban S https://www.reidcycles.com.au/reid-urban-s.html, which felt the same as the Urban x1. However, I realised it only has 7 gears. I would've go for Urban S rather than Urban X1 if I only do 10 minute rides every day.

My own amateur verdict is that the urban x1 does gives a much lighter ride. Though, I'm still considering going for the MTB Pro Disc just for the feel of suspension which I found to be quite fun and hopefully more durability. It is cheaper by $100 too!

For all of the bikes, the saddle was a killer. I've gotta do something about that.

The reid bike does feel less sturdy than the 2 bikes introduced by Cecil Walker Cycles Melbourne though. However, this doesn't mean the reid bike did not feel sturdy enough. As long as it doesn't fall apart within 3 years when I ride them, I can't justify the premium offered by the Giants bike.

Last time I ride a bike was for uni (a little over 6 years ago) for only a 10 minutes commute, bought it from Kmart -- it was heavy, and a little problem when switching gear. It had a suspension and I liked the comfort it brings. Nevertheless, I still managed to enjoy the daily ride. But there is no way I would ride that bike for 16km daily commute, so did some research and came across you guys. And I entered a world of bike's jargon I knew almost nothing of :shock:

It'd be good to see what your opinions are, and please ring the alarm bell if you think I'm making a mistake.

I just browsed around reid cycle website, and found their Reid City 2 Bike https://www.reidcycles.com.au/reid-city-2-0-bike.html. As of current I'm leaning to purchase the City 2 Bike because it has the hybrid tyre and the suspension I want. I don't feel that I need another test ride as I'm quite happy with both the Urban x1 and MTB Pro disc. I wanted the medium size, but they are out of stock until god knows when. So I'll go with the small size given it is the recommended size for my 162cm height. I want to have the bike before christmas so I can use the 10 days holiday to condition my body for the daily commute.

For the saddle: I'm thinking just purchase a gel-cover saddle from Big W https://www.bigw.com.au/product/diamondback-gel-comfort-saddle/p/8344117/

Also gonna get the $10 pump https://www.bigw.com.au/product/repco-mountain-bike-pump/p/5486144/ and their $19 helmet https://www.bigw.com.au/product/rosebank-voyager-helmet-s-m-red-black/p/8363683/. Not really sure how big of a difference does a $20 helmet is with a $60?

I also came across an article that says I should have an "inner tube" handy. I've never dealt with this, and don't even know how to install it as of now. Any direction for this can be helpful.

Any opinion is welcome. Let me know if there is any equipment I should have which I miss. Note that if I do go with Reid, they are currently giving out lights, bottle/cage, and a cable lock for free. So they got this covered for me.

Thanks in advance guys :)

tekapo
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby tekapo » Sun Dec 10, 2017 7:29 pm

7 speed will be fine. The 3x8 on the X1 isn't really required for a short commute. You'll never use the 28. The 42t on the Urban S is half way between the 48 and 38. So unless you are pretty fast, or lugging heavy loads. I doubt you will run out of gears, although 42x14 is on the slow side though.

Personally, I would probably save a couple of bucks and go with the Urban S, invest in some Marathons (https://www.schwalbetires.com/flat-less), racks/panniers, lights etc with the price difference.

Also forget about the City 2 or MTB, you don't really want the suspension. While 16k isn't that far, you still want to get though as fast as possible. If you want a more comfy ride, just get some fatter tires and run at a lower pressure.

Suspension isn't bad per se and can help with the bigger bumps, but if you are on the road or on trails, it should be smooth enough. I have bought hybrids with suspensions off Gumtree before, it was good and helps to some extent. But if I was buying a new bike and a more freedom in choices, I would avoid suspension.

BTW, getting the right fit and geometry is the most important aspect of buying a bike. Urban S and X1 looks similar though.

As to the saddle. I have a feeling that you didn't get the right size, or the seat/handle bar weren't adjusted properly. If a short test ride results in you describing it as a killer. Something is wrong.

As to the weight? If you looking to lose weight, the couple extra grams on the steel frame shouldn't matter.

fauziozi
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Mon Dec 11, 2017 1:21 am

Thanks for the reply.

I thought 16km is considered far? Someone told me the common commute is >10km. What's the average commute in the bike community?

I'm very surprised you recommend the urban S. Just borrowed a friend's bike today for a 1 hr ride. I did get to use more than 7 gears as I'm quite unfit so after a while I tend to switch to lower gear just to take a breath whilst keep pedallzing.

Do you mind explaining what you mean by 42t, 42x12 etc. I only know the 3 switch on the left handle to switch the front gear, and 7 the right handle to switch the rear gear. Thought this is what's called a 21 gear.

Yes the saddle was real bad, I didn't even wanna sit on all 3 bikes. I pretty much cycled whilst standing when I tested all 3. I even went to rebel today to see what my options are with replacing the saddle in feeling it in real life.

and whilst in rebel, they have a bike brand "flight" for $330 with suspension and also pretty light. Turned to consider that as well.

But given u also telling me to dump the suspension I'm really reconsidering it now.

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10speedsemiracer
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:27 am

No need for suspension if you're riding paths and streets. A decent sized tyre will provide a bit of comfort. Personally, I'd recommend something other than the Reids you've mentioned, when for similar $s you could pick up a better-framed, slightly better equipped bike. Have linked a Marin below, which will in all likelihood be a much better frame and overall package. Just an example though, there are Scotts and Specialized flat-bar roadies out there around the $600-ish mark, all of which should be better than the Reids. This Marin Fairfax SC3 is heavily discounted and has Schwalbe tyres (I like Schwalbes) and hydraulic discs by Tektro, and something called a Marin fitness plush saddle. I do not know what this means, aside from sounding comfortable.

https://www.bikeexchange.com.au/a/flat-bar-road-bikes/marin/vic/prahran/marin-fairfax-sc-3-speed-commute-bike/102920094
Mmm, SunTour

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bychosis
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby bychosis » Mon Dec 11, 2017 7:12 am

fauziozi wrote:Do you mind explaining what you mean by 42t, 42x12 etc. I only know the 3 switch on the left handle to switch the front gear, and 7 the right handle to switch the rear gear. Thought this is what's called a 21 gear.


It's all new to us at some stage! 42x12 relates to the teeth on the gears you are using. Cyckists typically call the gear they are in as the front ring teeth by the back cog teeth. ie 42 front X 12 back. Bigger on the front for harder/faster gearing. The 'cassette' on the rear wheel will have a range of gears 12-28 or 11-34 describing the soread of cog sizes from smallest to largest. Using that eptemrinology you can get a feel for the difference in gearing between bikes. Eg the bike might have 36 and 48 tooth chainrings (front) and 11-28 cassette for a lowest gear of 36x28 and a highest of 48x11 (which is a pretty good spread for a commuter bike)

The 21 speed you are using may a,so be known as a 3x7 setup, 3 on front X 7 on back. We use that terminology becuase bikes have changed over the years and use 3x, 2x and 1x systems, especially mountain bikes. Road bikes typically use 2x and hybrid or commuters typically 3x.

As for the saddle, yes, they will all feel horribly hard at first, but your bum does get used to it. Most regular cyclists won't use a gel pad on their saddle and prefer a narrower, harder saddle that fits right over a soft wide one as it reduces rub points. That said some saddles are better than others (for your particular bum) it's a very personal choice. I rode a new bike on the weekend and might be switching the saddle to an existing one my bum is comfortable with, but I'll give it a couple of rides first to see if I get used to it.
bychosis (bahy-koh-sis): A mental disorder of delusions indicating impaired contact with a reality of no bicycles.

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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby ironhanglider » Thu Dec 14, 2017 12:22 am

I might chime in here too. I agree with much of what has been said so far...

- a definite no for suspension. You don't need it, it adds unnecessary weight and is another moving part that can seize up or break down.
- a definite yes for highly puncture resistant tyres, Schwalbe Marathons are one example (any shop will swap them on for you at time of sale)
- a definite maybe for a different saddle, you will need to actually put some miles on a saddle before you can make a call one way or the other and a few mm change in position forward/back, up/down, and incline up/down can make a huge difference. Don't rush into it, but hey try the gel cover if you like. If it works for you that's great, if not it is not a huge loss.
- bike weight is important, depending on where exactly you join the KCT there are some really sharp little hills along the way like at Belford road, as well as the series of steps at the Chandler Highway crossing (unless you use the pedestrian lights at the Guide dogs which take a long time to change)
- gear range is important a 34 x 28 is about the maximum that an unfit, 20kg overweight person can use to get up to Belford Road on the KCT, particularly on the way home, and also for the new bit at the Chandler Highway path works. For sure there will be other riders who will get up there quicker in harder gears, but there is no point making life difficult for yourself. Otherwise walking up a hill is no big deal.
- as for accessories, unless you know how to use a pump and an inner tube don't waste your time for the moment. The recommendation for heavy tyres will fend the need for them off. The Sheldon Brown website, and other youtube resources can teach you about basic repairs and maintenance. When you do get a pump though, don't waste your time on a cheapie, it will only frustrate you more. The lights will be nice to have if you get caught out, but the front light is not a 'seeing' light, only a 'be seen' light.
- I like mudguards for a commuter and think that a rack is a must, although there are plenty of regular commuters without either.
- Helmets, they are all equally effective for warding off fines, the subsidised $5 'Melbourne' ones are great value. At low speed there is little difference in ventilation. The expensive ones may be more comfortable and have better buckles and are easier to adjust. You have to try them to see.
- As for distance 16km is still in the range that many riders will do for an everyday commute though it is about the limit of what I would do in regular clothing if I didn't have access to lockers, showers etc. For every km you go further out there are fewer riders. There aren't many out at 25km, although there is one bloke at my workplace with a 62km commute each way, every day. He is way out on the thin edge of the bell curve.

A good commuter bike doesn't have to be expensive, mine started as a $400 road bike from Aldi, however I have the advantage of being a competent mechanic, so I can both keep it running properly, and fix things as needed.

Cheers,

Cameron
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fauziozi
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Sun Dec 17, 2017 9:14 pm

Thanks heaps for the input guys.

I've finally settled with Marin fairfax sc 1 from Melbourne Bike Centre Prahran. The final choice was a surprise even for me as well, as it has no suspension!. So, the journey...

After reading some reviews and others' input on Reid bikes, I decided to research a bit more and increase my budget. As I'll be saving tons of transportation cost anyway. Plus, it is not a sunk cost because I can still sell the bike second hand later on -- I decided to splurge some more on the bike. So I kept an open mind, and grit my teeth whilst thinking "heck.. I'll even spend $1,000 if I really really like the bike".

So, my second trip hunting for THE bike, I drop by to a little shop on burke rd, Kew called Ride Cycles. They seemed to only offer specialised bike. Was served by Tom, a great bloke and shared tons of his knowledge with me. I tried their lowest end "rigid fork" bike (forgot what its called), and specialised crosstrail 2018 which has a suspension. The crosstrail with the suspension wins by far, the difference in the riding experience was quite significant for me. Was quoted $800 for the bike. At this point, I thought I'd never go without suspension.

Then dropped by Ivanhoe Cycles. A very busy store, but still with top notch customer service -- I was lucky enough to be served by the boss too. Tried their Giant Roam 2 which cost $799, it is a very sturdy bike -- loved it on the spot but it is the heaviest one out of all those that I tried so far. But given my last bike was from K-mart, this weight is nothing to me!. The boss recommended me to try out Canondale Quick 6 which cost the same -- he said that I'd probably still go for Giant Roam 2, but recommended me to give it a shot anyway. Canondale is the lightest bike I've tried, it almost didn't feel like a bike as it was very flexible too. To me, the canondale proves everyone point about rigid-fork = faster riding. All the other bike I've tried didn't give such a stark contrast between the benefit of rigid vs. suspension. Was quoted $649 for Canondale Quick 5 because I didn't like the color for the Quick 6, and the staff said the difference between quick 5 and 6 is very marginal anyway.

After thinking about it over a cup of coffee, I decided the specialised crosstrail 2018 came up on top for the trial of the day.

Then did a quick googlesearch about each of those bike on the iPhone; and found Total Rush in Richmond offers specialised crosstrail 2017 for $575. I made up my mind to lock in this bike. But alas, once I get there they don't have the Small size; and the rep suggested strongly against me buying the Medium size (I'm 162 cm tall). Total respect for the rep who cares so much about their customer, though disappointed I didn't get the bike.

iPhone says there is a bikestore nearby, TFM. Dropped by in there, but they didn't seem to have many bikes in-store. All the prices was above $850+, and I found no hybrid bike that is light enough to be comparable to the crosstrail. I then thought about just weighing to get the specialised crosstrail 2018 or go back to Reid to try their higher end bike; then make my final decision there and then.

Was getting late to the afternoon and scrolled through the iPhone and found Melbourne Bike Centre Prahran within 15 mins drive. I didn't have much hope about finding a better candidate of a bike. It is a very busy store, and after 15minutes just looking around, Blair attended to me. I told him I first prepared to pay only $500 for a bike -- but after research, I am now prepared to go up to $1,000 for the right one. He right away pointed at two bikes under $500: 2017 Shogun DS200 if I want a bike with suspension, and Marin fairfax sc 1 without suspension for $479. Both bikes are on sale at that price, and they are last stock as the new versions are coming in; both also have the size: small.

I right away thought I'd prefer the Shogun DS200 as it has suspension. But after test riding both the bikes, the Marin Fairfax sc 1 was THE bike for me! the right balance of weight (not too light as per the Canondale), feeling of sturdiness, and I even managed to do a brief wheely with it (Note that I've never felt that I'd be able to do a wheely with all the other rigid-fork bike I tested before, either because of its weight or just nervous that the bike would break apart given how light it is). Both bikes had some issues when shifting the gear, but I'm confident it was just maintenance issue which was confirmed by Blair. Decision was locked in, that was the best fit for me by far.. and the price was right! I bought it right away.

Also got a kickstand for $15, moon light set $59, floor pump $29, and a quadlock $69. Was given an additional $11 discount by Blair at the end of it. Collecting it tomorrow/tuesday as I can't fit the bike into my small sedan.

Passed by Amart Sportstore in Victoria Garden on the way home; and got a D-Lock for $29 and bottle-cage for $15.

Will get a helmet and a gel-saddle from Big W tomorrow.

And I forgot the mudguard! will call Melb Bike Centre tomorrow to install one of them before I collect it.

Riding days ahead!

Extra note: I asked for anti-puncture tires as you guys suggested. But all of the bikestore rep were against it, as it would've costed me more and given my cycling-path is only the road and the trails they all think that the existing tyres are good enough. I was informed that as long as the tyres are pumped correctly, most of the time the tyre would've just rolled over even the glasses on the road. So I stick with the current tyre for now.

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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby am50em » Sun Dec 17, 2017 9:25 pm

Mr Tuffys tyre liners will eliminate most punctures.

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bychosis
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby bychosis » Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:01 pm

Punctures can be random or regular. You can go for ages without any and then get a run of them. It depends on the paths/roads you take and your tyres.

I’ve had pretty good success with Mr Tuffy liners. Used to pick up lots of metal fibres from the concrete share path on
my commute (up to weekly punctures), but have had barely any since installing the liners (less than one per year)
bychosis (bahy-koh-sis): A mental disorder of delusions indicating impaired contact with a reality of no bicycles.

fauziozi
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:07 pm

Ouch.. I'm assuming you guys pump your tyres at least weekly as well as suggested by the store rep?

I really don't wanna have a punctured tyres on the trail, all alone -- at night :(

Now I'm on the fence whether I should just swap out the tyre / call to get that liner installed before I collect it.

How far can we keep cycling with a puncture tyre (assuming the most common width of puncture which I think it'd be from broken glass or the likes of thumbstack).

tekapo
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby tekapo » Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:28 pm

The Marin seems to come with the

https://www.schwalbe.com/en/tour-reader ... uiser.html

So it already have some protection with the kevlar liner. The suggested Marathon is one of the best and a couple steps above, and was recommended mainly because the Reids typically comes with pretty crappy generic tires with no/minimal protection. So yeah, you should be fine with these, anything Schwalbe are typically pretty good.

Keep it pumped and it should be all good.

If you are really paranoid though, Marathon Plus is the way to go :wink:

fauziozi
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Sun Dec 17, 2017 10:44 pm

Phew.. thanks for the assurance there tekapo.

I never paid any attention to the tyre brand for all the bike I tested. Though, after I mentioned about the anti-puncture tyre; the store rep said that the anti-puncture tyre he got out was just one step above the one already installed with the bike. So I am assuming you're right; though will check the brand again once I collect it

am50em
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby am50em » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:07 pm

Following the link, the tyre has K guard level 3 (out of 7) protection.
I have Marathon Supreme level 6. Only puncture was from a very thin long glass shard at which point I decided liner would be good idea. Since putting in liner, no punctures in over 7000 kms. YMMV.

Mediocratus
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby Mediocratus » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:21 pm

Once you get the bike go out for short rides to get your posterior used to the saddle. Don't try your 16km straight off till you are comfortable doing shorter distances. Once you feel comfortable with the bike try going on your commute ride on a weekend so that if you find it too long for your current fitness you can return home and try again some other time when you have built up your fitness a bit more.

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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Sun Dec 17, 2017 11:23 pm

fauziozi wrote:Phew.. thanks for the assurance there tekapo.

I never paid any attention to the tyre brand for all the bike I tested. Though, after I mentioned about the anti-puncture tyre; the store rep said that the anti-puncture tyre he got out was just one step above the one already installed with the bike. So I am assuming you're right; though will check the brand again once I collect it


Congratulations on the purchase, they look like a nice ride. As tekapo said, the Schwalbes are a good option for puncture-resistance on a commuter bike. Get a good floor pump with a pressure gauge, and check the tyres regularly, and observe the inflation recommendations. I think yours is 80psi, and I'd try them at 80 or whatever the tyre says, and see how it feels.

I use one of these : https://www.pushys.com.au/topeak-joe-blow-sport-2-floor-pump.html but am not suggesting you buy this exact pump, just something along these lines.

Hope you enjoy the bike.
Mmm, SunTour

fauziozi
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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby fauziozi » Mon Dec 18, 2017 12:07 am

Thanks guys.

Yes, I'm planning to get my fitness up during the christmas break with the shorter rides. Though, when I collect the bike I'll be riding 12-13km to ride it home. I expect to be floored right away after that, as just the test ride around the block got me all sweaty from this 20kg+ overweight. A deep sleep is expected on the day of collection, given the weather I think I'll grab it on Wed.

I've got the pump with the gauge for $29, was recommended by the store rep :D also showed me how to pump it right whilst indicating the marking on the side of the tyre (you're right, its minimum 45psi max 80 psi). He was against the hand pump, saying that they are almost useless and almost never be able to get the tyre inflated enough. It can be handy if got a flat one during ride, but he still wasn't encouraging it. He strongly recommend to just check the tyre w. the floor pump on a weekly basis and said I should be fine.

I'll ask about getting the liner after I check the bike's brand at the time of collection.

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Re: Purchasing first bike - just tested Reid bike

Postby bychosis » Mon Dec 18, 2017 5:52 am

Hope you enjoy your first ride home! Don't push too hard, it certainly isn't a race. :)

You might find the tyres feel better at less than max pressure, it may slightly improve the ride and efficiency too. Do a search and see if you can find the pressure charts, or hopefully someone here can link it.

Don't forget to allow some cool down time for your commute. I need at least 10min after riding before a shower, more in summer otherwise I'll just end up as sweaty as before the shower shortly afterwards and a Luke warm shower will cool you down better than a cold as the cold shower will send your body into preserving heat mode which you won't want after a hot ride.
bychosis (bahy-koh-sis): A mental disorder of delusions indicating impaired contact with a reality of no bicycles.

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