Help deciding between 2 road bikes

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:52 am

nickobec wrote:The correct answer is whatever bike will get you out of bed and riding.

There are a lot of valid opinions from other members about what works for them, but what will work for you?

Couple of thoughts

3km climb at 5%, assume that means 3km descent at 5% on the way home, good argument as any for disk brakes, once you throw in rain and traffic.

Mudguards, I have them on the bike I ride in street clothes to the train, but if I commute to work and that can be anywhere between 40 and 120km with one or two bunch rides thrown in, it is on a race orientated bike and if it is going to rain I dress appropriately shoes covers, wet weather bibs and jersey/jacket which you would need even with guards and throw on an ass saver.

Just pick the bike the brings the biggest smile to your face.


Maybe I should get a CX type bike or something with bigger tyres and disk brakes then? although I feel id be sacrificing di2 to do that and remain in my budget when a road bike would probably be just fine... but then you could argue that di2 isnt necessary either. AHHH buying a bike is hard - I already feel bad about spending the money!!

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:53 am

Duck! wrote:
bychosis wrote:Yup, that's millimetres.... 37 of them, which isn't that much in the overall height of the rider. Maybe 2%?

Precisely my point. :-)
My commuter is a roadie. There is no appreciable difference in my ability to see or be seen between riding in the drops or on the tops, and that's considerably more than 37mm difference.


This make me feel better about wanting a roadie that I can commute on and get into cycling more on weekends and stuff!

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:55 am

ValleyForge wrote:Welcome. I've never heard anyone admit "I spent more than I should".

Keeping it short:

Essentially no bike will keep its value. Buy the best frame & forks you can afford, as groupsets & wheels are easier to upgrade than visa-versa.

I'd leave the tyres as they are and reconsider when they have worn out.

I have been really impressed with Focus as a brand FWIW. Both my kids have Focus MTBs and the finish/value/package is exceptional.



Thank you for your reply, it certainly reassures me that whichever way I go won't be a bad decision (except for the fact that I'm spending 3x what I said I would!! LOL)

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:56 am

Derny Driver wrote:Don't buy a the Cervelo, a guy at my club is on to his 5th warranty replacement. I know of 3 other people who are unhappy with theirs as well.
Put simply, they break.


Thank you, after mostly leaning towards the Cervelo, i rode both again last night and there wasnt much difference except the Di2 was so much better. The Cayo has an 11-28 which should be marginally better than the 11-25 the cervelo has.

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:57 am

Duck! wrote:The proprietary bottom bracket system is another point against the Cervelo.



+3 FOCUS

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:57 am

P!N20 wrote:The only Cervelo to own is the Prodigy.

Get the Focus.


That's 4 points for the Focus!
Thank you

mitteh
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby mitteh » Thu May 31, 2018 9:59 am

CKinnard wrote:Keep in mind the road surfaces you are riding regularly. If they are not in great condition, you would be better on a wider tire at lower pressure. This will also be safer when roads are wet, and at night when you cannot see obstacles earlier.

And if you are going to consider a wider tire, >=32mm, then that will be a consideration on the frame, forks, and brakes you get.

If you want to do a lot of long distance or back road riding, wider tires at lower psi are one of the best things you can do to stay more comfortable = more shock absorption by the tires.
Wider tires are heavier but they are generally much more puncture resistant, which is a very big bonus when commuting.


I've been coming across this alot - but I'm having trouble finding something that has disc, wider tyres AND Di2 around my price range?
Thanks!

fat and old
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby fat and old » Thu May 31, 2018 1:20 pm

Derny Driver wrote:Don't buy a the Cervelo, a guy at my club is on to his 5th warranty replacement. I know of 3 other people who are unhappy with theirs as well.
Put simply, they break.


Racing?

I'm onto the fourth year with the R5. Fluctuated between 80 and 95kg :lol: . Use it as an all weather, all trails commuter/all rounder. K's are getting up there now (>>>20k). Only thing that broke was a stinkin Fulcrum spoke when I was at my fattest :lol:

25mm tyres on mine. 2014 model, I believe the later jobs take 28's.

Anyway, Nicobec is right. The bike that makes you wanna ride it is the one!

CKinnard
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby CKinnard » Thu May 31, 2018 6:03 pm

mitteh wrote:I've been coming across this alot - but I'm having trouble finding something that has disc, wider tyres AND Di2 around my price range?
Thanks!


Di2 heh? Let's see if I can do a hatchet job on that too! :D

OK, I have Di2 (ultegra) with internal battery.
Yes it is nice.... but there's pros and cons.
you probably already know what the pros are, so let me focus on the cons:

- with Di2 lever/switch wear, you find yourself having to apply more force and travel to trigger the switch, as much as for mechanical...which defeats much of the purpose of having Di2. Now some might disagree with me, but that has been very much my genuine experience.

- I find I can run chains and cassettes for longer periods using mech. Di2 is less tolerant of wear. And an old tip from the pros using mech. When they are doing long climbs some use the rear derailleur fine adjuster to bias quicker shifts to lower gears, then reset this to neutral on downhill runs. (I am talking 1/4 to 1/2 a turn.) This is more tricky to do with Di2 on the fly, though I presume possible.

- I cannot overstate how many times Di2 owners get caught out with flat batteries. Personally I only need to charge mine once a month, but I do know many for which charging might only be required 6-8x a year, that they often forget to do it as needed.

- I have a manual CX bike (11 speed cassette). Honestly, the gear shifts are as crisp and reliable as my Di2. And I never have to think about a battery.

- In all seriousness I am unlikely to buy Di2 again. Though I spent 30 years building my understanding of mech tuning, so mis-shifts are not a problem for me.

- One of the reasons I wouldn't do Di2 again is because I've got too many batteries to keep track of, across two bikes :
1 strong external battery pack headlight (800 lumens)
2 secondary usb headlights (up to 500 lumens)
3 strong usb rear lights (I always use two at night - helmet & seat tube)
1 garmin 520
1 bontrager Node 2 computer
2 ANT+ speedo/cadence sensors
1 smart phone!

Eleven batteries is enough to tend.

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nickobec
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby nickobec » Fri Jun 01, 2018 5:56 pm

mitteh wrote:Maybe I should get a CX type bike or something with bigger tyres and disk brakes then? although I feel id be sacrificing di2 to do that and remain in my budget when a road bike would probably be just fine... but then you could argue that di2 isnt necessary either. AHHH buying a bike is hard - I already feel bad about spending the money!!


Buy whatever bike works for you.

I have commuted on a bunch of bikes, including regularly on a TT bike. Most of my commuting is now done on my race bike and my ex-race bike, because they are fun to ride. I have more practical options: wider tyres, mudguards, relaxed geometry etc, but I take the fun over practicality any day.

djw47
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby djw47 » Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:25 pm

CKinnard wrote:another consideration..... a dedicated road bike has a shorter head tube, and lower bars, which is not ideal for commuting in heavier traffic (when it is advantageous to sit up higher and see further down the road).


You can sit up and hold the bars when on a road bike, you don't have to ride as if you're in a TdF sprint finale.
Image

CKinnard
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby CKinnard » Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:50 pm

djw47 wrote:
CKinnard wrote:another consideration..... a dedicated road bike has a shorter head tube, and lower bars, which is not ideal for commuting in heavier traffic (when it is advantageous to sit up higher and see further down the road).


You can sit up and hold the bars when on a road bike, you don't have to ride as if you're in a TdF sprint finale.


Not every roadie has brake access on the bars, only the hoods and drops.
My point still stands that it helps to be able to have your head consistently above car roof height (with hands on brakes), and many true racing bikes are not optimal for that.

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Thoglette
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby Thoglette » Thu Jun 28, 2018 4:45 pm

While I'll disagree with nickobec on mudguards :-) I agree with this one.
nickobec wrote:The correct answer is whatever bike will get you out of bed and riding.
Stop handing them the stick! - Dave Moulton
"People are worthy of respect, ideas are not." Peter Ellerton, UQ

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Thoglette
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby Thoglette » Thu Jun 28, 2018 4:52 pm

CKinnard wrote: and many true racing bikes are not optimal for that.

Yup. Don't blame the bars for the faults of the frame. No problem seeing around on this Rivendell.
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(stolen from BSNYC)
Stop handing them the stick! - Dave Moulton
"People are worthy of respect, ideas are not." Peter Ellerton, UQ

owly
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby owly » Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:17 am

mitteh wrote:
nickobec wrote:The correct answer is whatever bike will get you out of bed and riding.

There are a lot of valid opinions from other members about what works for them, but what will work for you?

Couple of thoughts

3km climb at 5%, assume that means 3km descent at 5% on the way home, good argument as any for disk brakes, once you throw in rain and traffic.

Mudguards, I have them on the bike I ride in street clothes to the train, but if I commute to work and that can be anywhere between 40 and 120km with one or two bunch rides thrown in, it is on a race orientated bike and if it is going to rain I dress appropriately shoes covers, wet weather bibs and jersey/jacket which you would need even with guards and throw on an ass saver.

Just pick the bike the brings the biggest smile to your face.


Maybe I should get a CX type bike or something with bigger tyres and disk brakes then? although I feel id be sacrificing di2 to do that and remain in my budget when a road bike would probably be just fine... but then you could argue that di2 isnt necessary either. AHHH buying a bike is hard - I already feel bad about spending the money!!


https://www.merlincycles.com/blue-prose ... 12888.html
Not sure if you'd still be within 4k if landed in Aust.
MUFC :twisted:

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singlespeedscott
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby singlespeedscott » Sun Jul 01, 2018 3:14 pm

Are you a fair weather commuter. If you are I would just stick with a standard road bike. As already stated keeping track of battery usage gets to be a pain (there’s only so many USB ports at work). For a commuter I would be sticking to mechanical shifting as it’s easier to deal with and has less to go wrong. Plus if you take a spill a mechanical rear derailleur is a lot cheaper to replace.

If your a true commuter, ie you ride in all conditions, I would seriously think about something that fits fatter tyres and mudguards. The fatter tyres have more grip in the wet and are less susceptible to punctures. If you buy good quality ones they are also no slower. Mudguards not only keep you cleaner but also reduce the amount of crap getting on your drive train, which will save you money down the track.
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10speedsemiracer
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby 10speedsemiracer » Sun Jul 01, 2018 4:13 pm

+1 for what singlespeedscott said...

Would help to know what sort of terrain/surface your commute ride will entail..i.e. is it all path or a mix of road/path, or is there loose surface involved?
Mmm, SunTour

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g-boaf
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Re: Help deciding between 2 road bikes

Postby g-boaf » Sun Jul 01, 2018 10:27 pm

I would just say that I have a bike with Di2 and another bike with SRAM Red E-Tap. Neither give me trouble so far as charging batteries or keeping track of what charge they have. I work in an office with agile working, so we don't have lots of USB ports, and we don't have fixed desks either, you are required to pack up your desk and wipe it down even if you are off to a meeting. If I can manage, surely anyone else can.

Both of them are very, very easy to deal with. Tuning both is simplicity - it doesn't get any easier. They both work flawlessly. I've done a lot of kms on E-tap. I did once forget to put the front derailleur battery on. But I hardly ever shift the front derailleur around town.

I think 25mm tyres are enough. I'm commuting on 26mm tyres, what Specialized does. They have good grip in the usual rain or dry conditions I use them in. We get a lot of rubbish on the road and paths here, but I don't get heaps of punctures on those tyres.

I don't have mudguards, but I can use a simple plastic cover that clips between the saddle rails, that works fine.

I commute on a race bike, that's a very comfortable bike and it's a lot of fun.

That bike has also been on rough dirt roads too, back then on 23mm tyres. It was okay then too.

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