Tools

Questions about purchasing bicycles and parts

Tools

Postby tuco » Fri Feb 23, 2007 2:35 pm

This is a fairly vague question but what would be an good selection of tools for bike maintenance and tinkering? Bear in mind I may have to work on the cranks and bottom bracket of one bike.

I don't know the technical names for them but like things to get the chain off and on.

I have the obvious items like a multi tool for the bike bag and tyre levers.

I found an ebay seller who sells a mountain of bike tools and bits and pieces including handle bar streamers. :oops:
User avatar
tuco
 
Posts: 2016
Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2006 3:36 pm

by BNA » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:35 pm

BNA
 

Postby europa » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:35 pm

Buy them as you need them. Some you'll be able to predict ... eg, a chain breaker, but though you might be using 8 speed or 9 speed now, your new bike might be 10 speed, so buy the gadget when you need it.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:46 pm

I use the same approach as Richard. But I must admit that there's been some good buys on tool kits on Torpedo7 lately.

Have a nice day
training log
ImageImageImage
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14532
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby sogood » Fri Feb 23, 2007 4:23 pm

I agree, buy as you need them. Also, except for those specialised component specific tools, most of the others can be cheaply sourced from the tools section of K-Mart, or Paddy's Market even. I bought one tool off eBay, and that's a bike workstand. It makes a huge difference in terms of convenience.

Fundamentally, the following seemed standard.

- Allen key set: 2mm for brake caliper adjustment up to 8mm for pedal installation)
- T25 torx screw: Seen more and more.
- Philips head: Here and there.
- Spanner: I find a small adjustable one works well.
- Chain whip/Cassette nut*: Brand specific. Needed to give that thorough degrease and drive train cleaning.
- Chain breaker*: Get a solid one or you'll regret over bent pins.
- Crank puller/BB specific tools*: No alternative but to have them if you want to work on your own BB. Or just pay the LBS to work on these and save on the tool cost.
- Torque wrench: Particularly important if you work on CF components. Can be expensive as you may need two units for different ranges.
- Bike workstand*: Don't get those ultra cheap ones where the bike is supported by the BB. You might as well as not have one. You can just get the clamp and mount it on your workbench or a platform of your creation.

* - These need to be sourced from LBS or eBay.

I wouldn't true/tension wheels casually. Pay and get it done right or make a big commitment to learn the art properly.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16796
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby europa » Fri Feb 23, 2007 4:40 pm

My workshop stand is a tow bar bike carrier rack clamped to a saw horse with an F clamp. Works a treat and cost me nuffin'. I don't even clamp the bike in place, the width of the bike support is enough to make it stable enough to work on.

But if I was honest, I'd admit that I'd love a real workshop stand.

Normal allen keys are nice, but T bars (a long key with a plastic T shaped handle) make life much easier.

Another set of tyre levers - I'm getting fed up with digging into my bike's tool bag for them.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby tuco » Fri Feb 23, 2007 4:57 pm

Okay, I'm getting an idea now.

Regular maintenance, a chain breaker to get the chain off and give it a good clean?

I like the idea of the bike carrier as a work stand. Just back the car up the drive way and work away. Good thinking 99.

What handy man doesn't already have a set of allen keys, philips head screw drivers and spanners?

It'll be awhile before I have to worry about a torque wrench on a CF frame.

I probably should have worded the question better. I did say it was vague.
Probably should have asked what tools are needed to perform certain jobs. EG Chain whip/Cassette nut to remove/replace cassette.

Anyway, thanks for the input.
User avatar
tuco
 
Posts: 2016
Joined: Wed Oct 11, 2006 3:36 pm

Postby europa » Fri Feb 23, 2007 5:12 pm

Dunno that you need a torque wrench. Although torques are given for a lot of stuff, they're really just company failsafe's. Do it by feel.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby sogood » Fri Feb 23, 2007 5:52 pm

europa wrote:Dunno that you need a torque wrench. Although torques are given for a lot of stuff, they're really just company failsafe's. Do it by feel.

You are mostly ok with steel and alloy components. But for CF, use torque wrench to play safe.

Torque settings are not just dreamed up numbers. There's usually good engineering basis for their existence. So adhere to the spec.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16796
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby MJF » Fri Feb 23, 2007 6:21 pm

europa wrote:Although torques are given for a lot of stuff, they're really just company failsafe's. Do it by feel.

Richard



AAAArhhhhhh!!! Heathen!

I have three torque wrenches - about $700 worth, from inch-pounds up to 150 lb/ft. Fasteners need to be tightened to a percentage of their ultimate tensile strength otherwise they will come loose or fail. An insufficiently tightened bolts in a stressed application will fail earlier than an overtightened bolt. And with threads into aluminium, there is little room for error...
MJF
 
Posts: 972
Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:18 pm

Postby sogood » Fri Feb 23, 2007 6:32 pm

Alu threads are slightly easier to judge manually. With CF, there's plenty of reports of cracked and/or damaged bars/seatposts on the various forum. All due to inadequate or excessive torque. The tolerance is just that much tighter.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16796
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Mulger bill » Fri Feb 23, 2007 9:34 pm

Start small and buy as you need them. There's a few kits from Aus sellers on ebay that'd be worth a look.

A few basics IMO...
A good book on bike maintenance, there's plenty out there, and if nothing else you can stop the boys at the LBS :roll: when you talk to them.
Chainwhip and (specific) lockring tool if you want your cluster to really gleam. It makes doing the rear hub easier too.
An onbike chain cleaner is handy if a little messy.
Chainbreaker and masterlink or shimano joiner pins. If you've got a splined BB spindle, don't forget the insert.
A bit of broken spoke ~100 mm long with a hook bent into each end makes breaking and joining chains easier.

I thought a simple hoist slung under the back veranda was pretty cool until a workstand came my way, ebay again says the GLW.

Sogood wrote:T25 torx screw: Seen more and more.
Torque wrench: Particularly important if you work on CF components


Ummm, where would the T25's be on a roadie? None seen on thenewone, :? the only ones on Princess secure the brake rotors.

Torque wrench needed now there's CF in my life. Are they an LBS item? What range will I need?

Do these T handle hex keys have ball ends?

Thanks

Shaun
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25270
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby tinstaafl » Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:04 am

Mulger bill wrote:Do these T handle hex keys have ball ends?
I have a set of each and would strongly suggest buying the ball ended ones.

They are a few dollars extra but are far more flexible to use. I use the ball end to do most of the tightening then switch to the side piece for the last turn.

Robert
tinstaafl
 
Posts: 103
Joined: Mon Dec 18, 2006 3:30 pm
Location: Ferntree Gully

Postby sogood » Sat Feb 24, 2007 5:22 am

Mulger bill wrote:Ummm, where would the T25's be on a roadie? None seen on thenewone, :? the only ones on Princess secure the brake rotors.

Torque wrench needed now there's CF in my life. Are they an LBS item? What range will I need?

Torx is needed with Campag groupsets.

Torque wrenches are available either through LBS (Park Tool) or general/auto tool stores. But I would suggest that you read up Park Tool's offers. Also do a Google on the subject so that you are well informed in your purchasing decision.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16796
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Mulger bill » Sat Feb 24, 2007 11:01 am

Thanks Robert and Sogood, that's two more things to go on the list :)
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25270
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby MJF » Sat Feb 24, 2007 1:08 pm

Mulger bill wrote:Torque wrench needed now there's CF in my life. Are they an LBS item? What range will I need?


Specialist tool companies, look for "Warren and Brown". Been bought out by Repco, I believe... You'll need to find out the torque settings first then pick an appropriate model... or models. Avoid the crappy clicker style from car parts places, a beam indicator is probably the cheapest & is more accurate than the clicker style.

Michael.
MJF
 
Posts: 972
Joined: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:18 pm


Return to Buying a bike / parts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Support BNA
Click for online shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Cycling Express Cycling Express
Ebay Ebay AU
ProBikeKit ProBikeKit UK
Evans Cycles Evans Cycles UK
JensonUSA Jenson USA
JensonUSA Competitive Cyclist