Park Tool pre-glued patches

open topic, for anything cycling related.

Park Tool pre-glued patches

Postby Bnej » Sat Apr 28, 2007 2:07 pm

Used one this morning. Seems to have worked really well.

Went to my normal Sat morning ride, no-one else showed because it was a bit drizzly, so I did the ride on my own. About 15km in it started really raining, I had lights on for extra visibility & got really wet & dirty.

So 27ks in, I start to hear a hiss noise, check back tyre, little shard of glass sticking in through the tyre. Fortunately there was a little shelter not far from where I got the flat, so I got under cover and had a look at my fix kit.

Removed the glass, pulled the tube out (didn't take the whole thing out), pumped it up a bit to find the leak, sanded area, remove backing & apply patch. Pumped it up again as soon as I got the tyre back on the rim and it all seems fine.

It's a neat little patch kit, very small little plastic box with 5 patches and a tiny bit of sandpaper. The patch stuck very firmly on the tube, think best to avoid your fingers.

Also was my first occasion to use my Blackburn Airstik pump, very good, got it pumped back up to good road pressure in no time flat. Total procedure was I think under 15 minutes, not bad considering I hadn't done it before.
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

by BNA » Sat Apr 28, 2007 2:30 pm

BNA
 

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 2:30 pm

I've used it too in the past. They definitely work at the time, but over time, it developed a slow leak from within the adhesive. As I couldn't fully remove the goo it left on the tube, it was impossible to re-repair the puncture. Ended up discarding the tube with that single puncture hole.

I still carry them in my saddle bag but only use them in the event that I've used up my spare tube.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Bnej » Sat Apr 28, 2007 2:39 pm

Ah.... I'll have to keep an eye on it.. hopefully mine won't do that.
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby mikesbytes » Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:10 pm

From what I understand they are good for a temporary fix, while you are out on the road, but are not suitable for a permanent fix, so if you use them, at the end of the ride, remove the tube and thow it away. I use the traditional glue and patch.

_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14762
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby europa » Sat Apr 28, 2007 5:35 pm

The Park Tool website makes no mention of them being temporary so could we be very careful about describing them that way - it could be your club mates just didn't apply them properly - even the traditional glue on patches have their failures if not done properly.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby mikesbytes » Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:10 pm

Everyone I have spoken to who used them have had them eventually come off.

_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14762
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby europa » Sat Apr 28, 2007 6:11 pm

mikesbytes wrote:Everyone I have spoken to who used them have had them eventually come off.


Which is a very different way of describing the situation. Bummer because they look like a good idea.

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:09 pm

That's appropriate enough for the term "temporary".

It's a low weight/volume/dependable backup solution to carrying a full glue/patch kit as there's no concern with that tube of glue drying out or running out. And it's also very quick to apply should one be unlucky to get punctures more than once on a ride. As Mike also pointed out, the repair isn't durable and in my case, it lasted for about two months before a slow leak developed.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Bnej » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:18 pm

Well I looked at some reviews, some people said they had three on one tube for over a year without issues, some people say they don't last more than an hour. It might depend on the tube it's applied to?
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:30 pm

Bnej wrote:Well I looked at some reviews, some people said they had three on one tube for over a year without issues, some people say they don't last more than an hour. It might depend on the tube it's applied to?

I think there are a number of issues apart from natural variance. Potential technical factors include how well the surface is prepared and whether the patched area is subjected to repeated inflation-deflation cycle.

Given it's primary use being on the side of the road, I would say that the surface preparation is mostly sub-optimal with wind, dust, rain, grease laiden fingers and poor lighting. And in my case, the repaired tube was subjected to a number of inflation-deflation cycles when I moved tyres from that wheel. I suspect that it would have done better if I kept it inflated and compressed against tyre's inner wall.

So I really don't think it's a good long term patching solution and I would now only use it as a backup. YMMV of course.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby mikesbytes » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:37 pm

It could also depend on the cleanness of the tube and the smoothness. With glue you are preparing the tube prior to sticking the patch on.

If you find applying glue too hard, then why don't you just buy 10 tubes from Torpedo7 for $30.

_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14762
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby Bnej » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:43 pm

Can't fit 10 tubes in a seat bag. :)
User avatar
Bnej
 
Posts: 2880
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:43 pm
Location: Katoomba, NSW

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:45 pm

So why do they sell patch kits with 6 patches? Why not 10? :wink:
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 7:47 pm

mikesbytes wrote:It could also depend on the cleanness of the tube and the smoothness. With glue you are preparing the tube prior to sticking the patch on.

That Park Tools glueless patch kit actually comes with the same granite paper and requires the user to clean and sand down the tube surface prior to application.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Mulger bill » Sat Apr 28, 2007 10:46 pm

sogood wrote:So why do they sell patch kits with 6 patches? Why not 10? :wink:


That'd be because the glue's gone off after four patches :roll:
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25641
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby Marv » Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:00 pm

Get yaself some Gatorskins.

8^)
User avatar
Marv
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 7:26 pm
Location: Launceston, Tasmania

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:06 pm

Marv wrote:Get yaself some Gatorskins.

Nothing can stop a 1" nail... :x
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Marv » Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:12 pm

No, most definately not.

Most punctures aren't through such determination though.
User avatar
Marv
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 7:26 pm
Location: Launceston, Tasmania

Postby sogood » Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:20 pm

Marv wrote:No, most definately not.

Most punctures aren't through such determination though.

Depends on who got lucky.

My four flats were glass chip (lower grade tyre), patch leak, industrial staple (1/2") and 1" nail.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Marv » Sun Apr 29, 2007 12:14 am

It's seems funny, but when I rode when I was younger I never remember flats being a concern at all.
I know I never rode with a spare tube, a pump, a kit or a mobile phone.
I know I did a lot of miles on the road even on my track bike.

Did they make tyres tougher back then?

How does everyday gravel/blue metal stack up as a hazard out of curiousity?
User avatar
Marv
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 7:26 pm
Location: Launceston, Tasmania

Postby Halfanewb » Sun Apr 29, 2007 6:40 am

I remember using tube patches that came with a little metal clamp which was used to hold the patch in place and a book of matches to light the sulfur on the top of the patch, this would melt the patch in place and give you a free high if you wanted to sniff the fumes!! :)
Halfanewb
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby mikesbytes » Sun Apr 29, 2007 11:42 am

sogood wrote:
Marv wrote:No, most definately not.

Most punctures aren't through such determination though.

Depends on who got lucky.

My four flats were glass chip (lower grade tyre), patch leak, industrial staple (1/2") and 1" nail.


The only way I haven't had a puncture is by someone slashing my tyres.

13th flat this year, in RNP just past flat rock.

_________________________________________________________________________________
Burn plenty of Glycogen
Frame Size Calculator.....Park Tools Repair Guides Frame Size Calculator.....Rolling Resistance.....Rolling Performance.....Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Technical Info
training log.....Body-Mass Index, Waist-to-Height Ratio, Basal Metaboic Rate
Bicycle FAQs.....Bicycle Safety.....Cadence in Cycling.....Types of Bicycles
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14762
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby europa » Sun Apr 29, 2007 11:43 am

mikesbytes wrote:The only way I haven't had a puncture is by someone slashing my tyres.


We can fix that. Where do you park your bike? :twisted:

Richard
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby heavymetal » Sun Apr 29, 2007 12:38 pm

I run with two tubes in my tyres :shock: If one goes flat, I pump up the other :lol:

But then again, I use real tyres made of rubber so I don't get punctures anymore :D
heavymetal
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 1381
Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:32 pm

Postby sogood » Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:23 pm

Marv wrote:It's seems funny, but when I rode when I was younger I never remember flats being a concern at all.
I know I never rode with a spare tube, a pump, a kit or a mobile phone.
I know I did a lot of miles on the road even on my track bike.

Did they make tyres tougher back then?

It is interesting isn't it? I rode quite a bit during high school and early uni days on a Raleigh 3 speed. Never had a puncture and never carried tubes.

Could the risk of puncture also relate to rider's weight and the amount of power being exerted on the tyres (lower risk if one just gently glide over glass)? This morning ANZAC Br was like a battle field with large patches of glass fragments spread right across the shared path. Didn't pick up any fragments after gently gliding over them twice (there and back).
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16929
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Next

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Exabot [Bot], Google [Bot], Jesmol, Mediocratus, warthog1



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit