Bacchetta Giro 26

Recumbents and all feet forward machines

Bacchetta Giro 26

Postby Kalgrm » Sat Jun 02, 2007 2:14 pm

When I joined this forum, Richard suggested I post some pics of my bike in the appropriate place. Well, since this bike is a recumbent, this seems like the best section for it to make its web début.

The current non-stock items are:
- XT dual control shifters
- XT Rapid Rise short cage rear derailleur
-Oury Lockon grips
- Avid BB7 disc brakes
- Avid Rollamajig
- Velocity VXC disc rims laced to Hope XC hubs (my first wheel build)
- Serfas Barista 26x1.25 tyres
- Crank Brothers Candy SL pedals
- ADEM headrest
- modified Topeak Super Tourist DX disc rack- Bacchetta "Brain Box" seat bag.
- (and fitted fresh this morning - an extra light mounting section, 2 pics posted for the benefit of Hotdog. I still need to stick a pair of bar plugs in that mount to make it look a little less ghetto :))

Cheers,
Graeme


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by BNA » Sat Jun 02, 2007 5:05 pm

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Postby europa » Sat Jun 02, 2007 5:05 pm

What's the idea of the bar in front of the chainrings? Touring pegs for fast down hill runs? :shock: or is that your new light mount? Is that another drink botlle holder under there?

The wheels narrower? Or did you just want different rims and hubs? What was wrong with the stock items?

For a three thousand dollar bike (yes, I priced one - the was FF's answer to my request for a cheap recumbent :roll: ), you've spent a bit of money on upgrades. Should work nice though :D

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Postby Kalgrm » Sat Jun 02, 2007 5:55 pm

Europa wrote:What's the idea of the bar in front of the chainrings?


That's my new bull-bar. :wink:

Yes, that's the place I'm going to mount my lights. There isn't any practical place to mount lights on the bike, because there is very little clearance between the bars and my legs (so the bars are out ....). To date I've been running my flasher light from the front der post, and a helmet mounted HID to see where I'm going. My "bull-bar" is going to have driving lights fitted this weekend.

Yes, that is another drink bottle holder under there. There are lugs on the frame as supplied. I'm putting my Li-ion battery, plus a few spare parts in an old bidon and sliding it into that holder.

These wheels are sacrificial offerings from my MTB. They are lighter and better quality than the ones supplied with the bike as stock. I really should have bought a frameset, but the spares coming off the Giro will be used on a project bike to get my wife riding again. They are standard MTB parts, so they interchange well.

I think I've only spent another $350 on upgrades - the internet is a wonderful thing! Frankly, I was disappointed with the quality of the components on this $2750 bike. For only $300 more, they could have done so much more from the factory. On the plus side though: I can't stop smiling when I'm on this bike!

(BTW, a frame-set was only going to be about $1850, including seat, bar and riser, idler etc. If you already own a decent MTB, scavenging parts from it would indeed get you a cheaper 'bent, but not by much .... :roll: )

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby europa » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:03 pm

The Bentech project still sounds like the go.

I wonder what the realities would be of copying the Barchetta with exhaust pipe tubing (as used on the Bentech). Sure, it'll be heavier, but by copying the layout and geometry, I wonder how it'd go.

Richard
he who can't afford wheels for the Europa, but still maintains his drive to get a bent - surely someone has a frame buried under a pile of stuff somewhere.
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Postby Mulger bill » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:06 pm

Nice looking bent there Graeme. :)

Why the bartape on the inner bar and the riser?

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Postby europa » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:10 pm

And the stearing - that small, horizontal neck. What does that do the steering and why is it there?

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Postby Kalgrm » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:14 pm

"Why the bartape on the inner bar and the riser?" On the riser, it's really only stopping the cables from flapping it the wind. Aesthetics ..... plus the rubbing on the legs would get annoying too, I suppose.

On the inner bar, it has two functions: the cables, if left to take a natural route, impede the view of the road ahead. When I sit in the normal riding position, they are right in my line of sight. That's not much of a problem in the day (I ignore them), but with my helmet mounted HID, they really distract me from more important things, like pretty girls on the bike path .... :)

The other function is to cushion my knees and shins, should I bang them on the bars (which I have done but I'm getting better at my technique ....)

Cheers,
Graeme

Oh, and Richard, if someone with a 'bent has a frame buried under a pile of stuff, it's likely to be a diamond frame. They don't get used much after the 'bent event. :twisted:
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Postby europa » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:20 pm

Kalgrm wrote:Oh, and Richard, if someone with a 'bent has a frame buried under a pile of stuff, it's likely to be a diamond frame. They don't get used much after the 'bent event. :twisted:


I have a long track record of rescuing stuff discarded by the less sensible :D

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Postby Kalgrm » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:21 pm

europa wrote:And the stearing - that small, horizontal neck. What does that do the steering and why is it there?

Richard


That "horizontal" bit (I had to search to see what you meant ....) is something that Bacchetta "sells" as a design feature. It's a hinged fitting to allow the riser to be pushed forward, allowing better fit of the bars in the horizontal position. I have mine set further back than recommended (ie my elbows are a little bent).

Personally, I think it's poorly designed - they needed another bolt on the other side to stop the bars moving forward easily, as they currently do. The pivot is not locked out, just stiffened by tightening a bolt. It annoys me, but only when I'm pushing the bike, not riding it.

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby europa » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:25 pm

Ah ha. I thought it was some part of the steering geometry and couldn't see what use it would be. Now I know it's of little use at all :wink:

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Postby Kalgrm » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:27 pm

europa wrote:I wonder what the realities would be of copying the Barchetta with exhaust pipe tubing (as used on the Bentech). Sure, it'll be heavier, but by copying the layout and geometry, I wonder how it'd go.


I think it could be done - the design is a simple one, but you might end up with more flex than you want. These bikes have a "tear drop" shaped section for the main bar, with the thin end of the tear drop pointing down to improve stiffness in the vertical direction. (You can see it in the last two pics above.)

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby mikesbytes » Sat Jun 02, 2007 6:52 pm

Both wheels are the same size ? Thats conforming.

Next thing the owner will be clean shaven, definently against the rules.

BTW, nice bike !!!!!!


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Postby Hotdog » Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:25 am

mikesbytes wrote:Next thing the owner will be clean shaven, definently against the rules.

I made a point of having a shave prior to taking my 'bent on her first group ride. I'm a rebel, me :wink:

I also find the flex stem a bit pointless, though some people apparently find it useful when clambering on and off their ride and also to increase handlebar clearance during low speed tight turns. The ability to adjust the angle of the riser is possibly useful, but you could do that with a locking pivot, and it's notable that the more perfomance orientated Bacchetta bikes have the so called 'stiffie riser' :roll: which is just an extension of the fork steerer tube with no pivot at all.
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Postby Kalgrm » Sun Jun 03, 2007 2:44 pm

I conform to the stereotype - grey beard and over 40. No aerobelly though .....
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Postby MountGower » Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:37 pm

.......see if Richard will loan you his to try out for a while.
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Postby europa » Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:49 pm

MountGower wrote:.......see if Richard will loan you his to try out for a while.


Well, I haven't had a beard in ten years so I guess you're referring to my safetygut - every rider should have one, saves all sorts of injuries to your front when you come off at speed and unlike an airbag in a car, you don't have to inflate it first.

Ten years ago, I had a full beard (down to the second or third button of my shirt) and a ponytail (that I could grasp by reaching behind me) - I was hairier than my collie dog :shock: Of course, my bald spot was well developed in those days (got it in my twenties) but I was skinny (unlike now where I'm 'cuddly').

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Postby Kalgrm » Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:08 pm

MountGower wrote:.......see if Richard will loan you his to try out for a while.


I could never do that: what if I lost his one too? I'd need to grow another of my own and courier it back to him (the freight alone would cost a fortune!). Apparently I was not careful enough with mine and I misplaced it.

I don't think I can afford the beer needed to invest in the infrastructure these days. I believe Richard's one has used quality local products (Coopers) in its construction.

:wink:

Cheers,
Graeme
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Postby europa » Sun Jun 03, 2007 11:56 pm

This particular forum is rapidly becomming the home of Ratbag's Annonymous. Mind you, I'm not suggesting this is inappropriate :roll:

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Postby Hotdog » Mon Jun 04, 2007 9:59 am

Here are some more photos of my new toy. I didn't have a beutiful beach handy, so I settled for doing the photo shoot on my balcony. My Trusty Steed can be seen in the background, sulking about the way I've not only neglected her in favour of New Bike but added insult to injury by stealing her pedals too.

Unlike Graeme's my bike is essentially stock, i.e. SRAM X.7 twist grip shifters and long cage rear derailleur, Tektro MT4.0 levers, Avid BB5 brakes, Alex DA16 rims laced to Formula hubs and Kenda Kwest 26x1.25 tyres. The stolen pedals are Shimano M424s. In the photos the bike is ready for my commute, with a B&M handlebar mirror, bell, chunky old Cateye EL300 headlight mounted on a Minoura Space Grip attached to the front derailleur post, a pair of Planet Bike Superflash tail lights mounted on the seat stays, a Topeak Road Morph G pump mounted to the oddly placed under-boom bottle cage bosses and an almost matching colour 12l Radical Design Solo Aero seat back bag. I'm really pleased with the bag, it's big enough for my commuting load (change of clothes, shoes, wallet, keys, phone, multi tool, spare tube, puncture repair kit), looks good on the bike and doesn't need a rack.
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Postby europa » Mon Jun 04, 2007 10:13 am

Definitely getting her sorted. First on the forum to get a speeding ticket?

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Postby Kalgrm » Mon Jun 04, 2007 10:59 am

Very nice indeed! I particularly like the bag - it looks much better than the Bacchetta version. Like you, I put all those goodies into my bag and the racks haven't seen much use since the bag arrived. I will need to bring my laptop home from work this week, so the rack will once again be recruited into active service. (I am harbouring secret designs for a tail sock using the rack as the supporting frame, but more on that when I pull my finger out and actually make the thing!)

The Space Grip is a good addition too - I might see if I can find one for mine.

Cool bike, and I can see why you're proud of it!

Graeme
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Postby Hotdog » Mon Jun 04, 2007 5:05 pm

A tail sock, eh? So the Giro 26 isn't fast and funny looking enough for you? :wink: Terracycle make one to fit Bacchettas but they're almost $300 USD for a piece of lycra, an aluminium frame and a light, I can see why you'd be more inclined to make your own!

When I visited Flying Furniture to do some test rides I asked about seat back bags and Ian showed me both the Bacchetta Brainbox and the Radical Design Solo Aero. The Radical Design bag is a bit more basic in some ways, no water bladder pouch or mesh pockets, just one small internal pouch and a water bottle holder on the left side, but I preferred the looks. I plan to get a FastBack Double Century hydration pack to carry water bladders and tool kit, etc. below the seat, should be ideal by itself for recreational rides and combined with the seat back bag for commutes.

The Space Grip works pretty well, though I'm not sure about the build quality (I've already lost one of the end plugs while riding, and had the other fall off too). There's a black version which would have looked better, but I could only find the gray ones and I needed a quick fix so that I'd be able to start commuting straight away.
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Postby rdp_au » Mon Jun 04, 2007 5:43 pm

Very nice looking machines, both.. I do like the seat and bag setup. Very neat. I've been toying with building a new seat for the humble Bentech to replace the current simple frame and mesh version. The carbon backplate should be light and comfortable. Not that there's anything wrong with my current setup, but upgrades are a natural part of the evolutionary process, aren't they?

By the way, here's a link to a simple, and I supect, quite effective tail fairing.

http://www.raptordesigns.com/misc/bent_fairing.htm

Cheers,

David
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