Avanti or Giant ?

Questions about purchasing bicycles and parts

Avanti or Giant ?

Postby Keithb » Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:48 pm

I'm thinking of replacing my old cheap MTB with an Avanti Blade Comp (or Blade Pro) or a Giant CRX1. I will be going mainly on half day or day rides (30 to 60 km) but am also doing a 3 week bike trip next year.
I don't know anyone with these bikes but would like advice from any knowlegable riders out there.
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by BNA » Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:57 pm

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Postby Bnej » Sun Jul 01, 2007 9:57 pm

Both are good bikes, and if you are going to get one I think you can just pick whichever you like better, but....

For the distances you are talking, a drop bar road bike might be more comfortable. You get more hand positions, and the levers/shifters are in a more natural position than on a flat bar bike. You can get onto the drops at higher speed and save energy through better aerodynamics.

Since you're looking at high end flat bars, a drop bar roadie is going to be in your price bracket. Don't buy a flat bar just because that's what you're used to - I am a recent convert to drops and am finding longer rides far better than they ever used to be, I suffered from some wrist discomfort (RSI) previously with 20-50km rides on flat bars.
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Postby Mulger bill » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:09 pm

Bnej wrote:Both are good bikes, and if you are going to get one I think you can just pick whichever you like better, but....

For the distances you are talking, a drop bar road bike might be more comfortable. You get more hand positions, and the levers/shifters are in a more natural position than on a flat bar bike. You can get onto the drops at higher speed and save energy through better aerodynamics.

Since you're looking at high end flat bars, a drop bar roadie is going to be in your price bracket. Don't buy a flat bar just because that's what you're used to - I am a recent convert to drops and am finding longer rides far better than they ever used to be, I suffered from some wrist discomfort (RSI) previously with 20-50km rides on flat bars.


+1

G'Day Keith :)

For those distances, definitely look at a drop bar unless your back has issues with the idea.

Giant and Avanti are both great brands, (I'm a Giant pilot BTW :wink: ) it's really a case of test ride and buying the one that makes you think "YES!" Don't ask us to define "YES" Greater minds have failed too. :lol:

Have a blast finding out mate, don't forget to roll past with a nice piccy when you're done 8)

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Postby europa » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:24 pm

Welcome to the nuthouse Keith. We try to keep the mtb people under some sort of control, though you wouldn't think it sometimes :roll:

Avanti or Giant? They are both good brands, buy the bike you fall in love with.

I agree with the others that an mtb is not really bike for the sort of rides you propose, unless you are going to be doing many of them on the dirt eg, fire track explorations. However, an mtb with slicks will easily do 100km rides too. A mountain bike has a very upright seating postion (catches the wind that that aerodynamic drag is the greatest force you have to overcome), tend to be heavier than any road bike of equivalent price, and fatter wheels (aero drag and effort) - they are designed to ride dirt tracks, not paved roads.

While I personally would choose a drop bar bike to do those sorts of distances, hybrids will also do them quite comfortably though at modest speeds. The hybrid will give you an upright seating position similar to an mtb, but are lighter and have more road orientated wheels - basically, they are more efficient on the road than an mtb and have quite a dirt road capability too.

You do NOT need a hybrid or an mtb to ride on unpaved road - I ride my Trek520 touring bike on dirt bike tracks, but they are smooth dirt tracks, I've got an mtb for the rough stuff.

If going for a drop bar bike, which is the most efficient on the road, you do NOT have to go for a pseudo racer - for example, Trek's Pilot range have drop bar bikes in what is a fast hybrid, or you could go for a touring bike such as the Mongoose Randonneur, similar to a racer but with a more comfortable position and tougher wheels.

Bit more thinking involved methinks, but despite all that, a Giant OCR3 will do what you want and you'll have a hell of a blast doing it, or any of a lot of other bikes.

Remember, buy the bike you fall in love with - you'll ride her further and more often :D

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Postby Mulger bill » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:46 pm

europa wrote:We try to keep the MTB people under some sort of control, though you wouldn't think it sometimes :roll:


You'll need a bigger worm than that :wink:

europa wrote:I've got an mtb for the rough stuff.


See above quote by europa, it's hard to slap yourself down :twisted:

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Postby europa » Sun Jul 01, 2007 11:59 pm

Shaun, you can be as rude as you like, but us elderly gentlecyclists have a different daffinition of 'rough stuff' to you younger bucks **pokes tongue out**

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Postby Mulger bill » Mon Jul 02, 2007 12:05 am

All right then, you didn't need the worm :oops:

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Postby Keithb » Mon Jul 02, 2007 8:05 am

Thanks for your input guys - I'll have a rethink and let you know what I get. It won't be for a few weeks probably as I live in the country, so will have to make couple of visits to a big town.
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Postby drevil » Mon Jul 02, 2007 9:44 am

Hi Keithb

I was in a similar situation to you recently. I was riding a hybrid which was good, but I wanted to increase my distances and my overall speed. I looked at a flatbar road bike, but after visiting many shops, talking to heaps of people and doing the usual on-line research, I decided on a drop bar rodie.

Last week I took posession of a Giant OCR2, which is pretty much entry level except it has carbon forks & seatpost. I have only done about 35m on it so far, but I love it.

I went with the drop bar mainly because of the comfort factor on longer rides and the seating position. Definately worth a look.
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Postby Mulger bill » Mon Jul 02, 2007 7:02 pm

drevil wrote:Last week I took posession of a Giant OCR2, which is pretty much entry level except it has carbon forks & seatpost. I have only done about 35m on it so far, but I love it.


Guess who's gonna have a blast! :D

Shaun
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Postby Kalgrm » Mon Jul 02, 2007 11:06 pm

Guess who would have had a bigger blast had he bought a recumbent? 8) :twisted:

Cheers,
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Postby triode12 » Fri Jul 06, 2007 1:57 pm

My main ride is an 07 CRX1 and while it is not a bad bike. I would look at a late 80s/90s vintage steel (Cr Mo) roadie instead.

I just picked up a nice early 80s Kuwahara roadie off Ebay and it rides so much nicer (& more comfortable) than the Alu CRX1 even with it's original and worn components. And it weighs about the same as the CRX1, and will be a lot lighter with modern components/wheels. The BB feels stiffer than the one of the CRX1.

The only catch is finding a bike on Ebay in your size and perhaps having to spend another $5-700 on a new groupset (e.g. Shimano 105 or Ultegra off www.probikekit.com ) and a set of new wheels (Shimano 550 - $269 from Cell bikes) and yr LBS to put it all together ($150-200).

But if you do pick up one with serviceble parts and wheels, then all that would be needed would be a full service (complete overhaul) at your LBS and a set of new tubes & tyres.

Thinking about it now, I wish I had bought a used steel roadie first off. I probably wouldn't have purchased the CRX1.
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Postby LuckyPierre » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:23 pm

I agree with the sentiment that's coming out here (being nearly as biased towards the 'retro' end of town as europa and 531db), but you do see some funny things crop up on eBay - have a look at this. I wish I was the one who sold it to them! :wink:
Litespeed Classic - 3Al/2.5V titanium tube set, Record 9-speed groupset, Open Corsa Evo CX
Alchemy Diablo - Columbus Zonal tubing, Ultegra 9-speed groupset, UltraGatorskins
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:10 pm

LuckyPierre wrote:I agree with the sentiment that's coming out here (being nearly as biased towards the 'retro' end of town as europa and 531db), but you do see some funny things crop up on eBay - have a look at this. I wish I was the one who sold it to them! :wink:

Seems the seller does know if it was brought or a gift either! Also love the comment about the car!

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Postby Bnej » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:13 pm

"I was given these pants and shoes as a gift, but never use them as I have a car"
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Postby Aushiker » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:15 pm

And there is this from late last year. Makes you wonder...

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Postby GaryF » Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:13 pm

Giant or Avanti - I would go for a Giant. They're the biggest bike manufacturer in the world and they make frames for the likes of Bianchi. If they're good enough for Bianchi they're good enough for me.
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Postby gururug » Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:20 pm

Anything goes wrong with an Avanti (warranty) the bits have to be sent backt o the manufaturer for a decision on wether or not they are covered by warranty. This is what the LBS who sold me my avanti told me anyway.

I like my avanti but if giant have a better return / warranty procedure i would lean toward the giant also.

Buy from a bike shop who has gone the distance for you. Not the one with the most words and smiles "before" you buy the bike. (reputation, reputation, reputation.)
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Postby Bnej » Wed Jul 11, 2007 7:41 pm

gururug wrote:Anything goes wrong with an Avanti (warranty) the bits have to be sent backt o the manufaturer for a decision on wether or not they are covered by warranty. This is what the LBS who sold me my avanti told me anyway.


Same procedure for any manufacturer. They have to check if it is a defect (covered) or wear-and-tear/abuse/damage (not covered). Some manufacturers might send a rep who will take pictures to be sent back.

Some people abuse their bikes horribly then expect it to be covered.
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