Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Georgey » Thu Jul 09, 2009 10:02 pm

Just noticed this thread and thought I ad my 20 cents worth.

It was a couple of years ago when I finally decided to get of my 20kg mountain bike and started looking around for a good roadie.
I drive around alot with work and called into all but a few bike shops in and around Sydney which made my head to spin (options, types, price etc).

The best advise Ireceived was from experienced riders who just loved to ride more than the love of the bike.
It's true that a good roadie starts from $800 (when on sale). I was told that carbon is not required but carbon forks and stays do help over bumps. I was told by a few trusted riders that 105 gear sets are a very good start and even OK as entry level into racing.

The most useful advise I received was to buy at the end of the year (if you can wait that long) and look for the run out models or previous models that the bike shops are trying to move to make way for new stock.

Unless you have a disposable income I strongly believe it is not necessary to pay more than $2000. I ride with a good group and some of the quickest guys ride the cheapest bikes ($750 - $1700).
One rider doesnt even have a full carbon frame....OH MY GOD :o

Just when I was going to compromise on quality I found the bike I really wanted at the price that I (MY WIFE) was willing to pay!

If you are like me and a little obsessed with maintance it will last for ever.
Real men ride compacts

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby ozrider » Sat Jul 11, 2009 10:18 am

I went down this road in March this year when I upgraded from my Flatbar hybrid. I went to all the LBS in the area and ended up feeling confused and, in a few cases, like I was wasting their time because I didn't have 1000's of $ to spend.

My advise would be to set yourself a budget, research what is available both in new and second hand and go from there.

My decision was made largely by the dismissive advise that I was given from most LBS -

- under $2000 most alloy frames are about the same quality
- look at what equipment is bolted to the frame
- get the best bang for your buck.

I tried a few different models for 'comfort' and finally settled on an alloy frame with Tiagra group-set and Mavic Wheels for under $1000.

(PS. I tried identical bikes at different places and they rode very differently because of set up, a good bike shop will at least take the time to make what changes they can to make the test bike fit before you ride it.)
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Marcy1 » Fri Aug 14, 2009 12:27 am

Howsit Guys...

Im starting to "race" bikes rather than just ride them and im looking for help on whether to choose aluminium or carbon...

I have a few models ive been told to look at.. These include the:

Giant TRC Alliance
Specialized Roubaix comp
GT Carbon Sport
Bianchi 928 carbon

What ya Think?

Regards

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Cinder » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:11 pm

Lots of great advice in here!

I've been doing some shopping around recently (looking at a Felt currently to work along side my Cindercone) and it's amazing how much price and service varies!!!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby steambao » Wed Oct 28, 2009 12:23 pm

If it's a second hand bike, the following questions are pretty important and can help suss out a deceitful person :lol:

How long have you ridden this bike for?
And then check the wear on the chain, rear cassette and front crankset - this usually gives away if he was telling the truth :P

Have you made any upgrades/changes (from the original stock model)?
Requires research on the model you are GOING to buy.

Where did you buy it from?
And ask for whether or not he has registered the IMEI number!

Do the gears shift fine?
Ask for a test ride and do test all gear combos :P
Most second hand bikes will have their limit screws/cable tensions set wrongly so shifting is usually always a problem.

Have you had any minor crashes?
Look at the bike from behind and ensure the frame isn't bent. Especially the rear derailleur hanger. You could also look if the wheel spokes aren't obviously bent too.

If you not sure how to check, they are all in google/youtube!

I'd add the links but I'm at work atm :(
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby ;Heners » Thu Feb 25, 2010 10:03 pm

Good read for New Riders, sound be very useful.
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Which road bike should I buy?

Postby stevetdflover » Sun Mar 07, 2010 8:12 pm

I am looking at buying a "plush bike" aka endurance performance bike i.e. with more comfortable geometry without sacrificing performance. I have spent plenty of time on the net and spoken to a few salespeople in lbs - all very helpful with very good arguments to support their own products (no surprise there) - I'm in retail myself - new Audi. In the higher (boutique) price group - Pinarello FP3, Look 566, Cervelo RS, Trek Madone 4.9 and the more realistic (for me) price range - Scott CR1 PRO, Wilier Mortirolo, Avanti Cadent 2, Giant Defy Advanced 1 and as of today, Merida Scultura Evo 907 (have I left anyone out?) BTW - Carbon frame only with latest Ultegra 6700 groupset. Any comments - suggestions?
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby machamilton_ » Tue Mar 30, 2010 8:34 am

I am also looking at upgrading to something similar to the specs mentioned (have looked at Trek, Giant, Scott, Merida so far), would like to hear any feedback..
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Wildflower » Wed May 05, 2010 9:45 am

machamilton_ wrote:I am also looking at upgrading to something similar to the specs mentioned (have looked at Trek, Giant, Scott, Merida so far), would like to hear any feedback..

I bought my second road bike at the beginning of 2009; a Giant Defy 1 after a break for 22 years (because my old Indi Condor died) and it cost just under $2000. I didn't know much about bikes and didn't know about getting fitted and neither did the bike shop either know or suggest it. The bike has a full alloy frame and rides ok but has its limitations. I never really felt as if it was "my" bike. The thing that I didn't like was the Tiagra groupset and the gears were a little problematical because I would be pedalling and the crank would shift suddenly on a downstroke throwing me out of balance. For the price though; all right.

This year I upgraded my bike to a Trek Madone 4.5 and the difference in the ride is phenomenal. The bike hugs the corners and is a lot more responsive and faster and the carbon frame means no more juddering over bumps. I also changed to a combination of Shimano Ultegra on the back and 105's on the front and most importantly of all, had the bike properly fitted for me. It is amazing what a difference it makes. I love riding this bike and it is as though we belong with each other as I ride. Colour mightn't matter to lots of you but it does to me and I love my blue and white bike. This bike is smoother and faster and I'm glad that I upgraded. In regard to cost, you should do your best to get the ride that you love, especially if you do a lot of riding like I do. To help matters along, you can either save up with your goal in mind, or do what I did and pay the bike off. Lots of LBS have a scheme where you pay the bike off over a period of time and this loan is also interest free because the bike shop pays the interest; why? because they know that if they can sell a bike to you, then they get your business so it offsets the interest payments they have to make.

Next point; pedals. I eventually changed from toeclips to clipless and although it was scary and took a little time to get used to them, they are really good. I also like my shoes They are Bontrager (Trek) RXL; very light and comfortable. It might be hard for people who haven't ridden a bike in a long time, but get used to the bike and learn to ride it first, then try out thye new pedals. Don't do both together unless you are very brave and like steep learning curves.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby billyj95 » Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:21 pm

do you think its worth buying a new carbon fork on my new orbea flat bar
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby goneriding » Fri Aug 20, 2010 2:46 pm

I take it that the existing forks are not carbon? if so there are few considerations I can think of:
1. the carbon forks will be lighter.
2. the carbon forks will give you a smoother ride.
3. If you are using the bike as a commuter keep in mind it will get hammered over time by the weather, work bike racks (worst of all), and crashes. Carbon tends to be less robust in these circumstances.

That said, my commuter came with carbon forks and the forks themselves have been fine.

If you want to upgrade something you are better off starting with wheels.

Two other pieces of general advice unrelated to carbon forks are:
1. cut yourself a couple of pieces of old tyre and put them in your bike bag. If you cut a tyre badly you can use the tyre cutting to temporarily plug the hole. The LBS can probably give you a couple of pieces as well.
2. get a CO2 pump. Trying hand pump a tyre in the height of Summer or the dead of Winter is one of the "un-fun" parts of cycling!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Kalgrm » Fri Aug 20, 2010 7:07 pm

[Mod Helmet]

Guys,

This thread is for GENERAL advice for newbies. Please start a new thread when asking about specific bikes.

The items above dealing with specific bikes will be removed soon.

Cheers,
Graeme

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Maroo » Thu Oct 07, 2010 1:53 pm

Hi,

Sorry if this should be posted somewhere else (or not at all), but I know how particular people can be about their forums, so I thought it best not to start a new thread.

I’ve just (yesterday) decided to buy a bike (first one since my BMX packed it in 15 years ago as an 11 year old), with the intention of using it for regular exercise. From my limited research, it seems that a flat bar road bike (sorry I’m not up with the acronyms) is the way to go, just wanted to ask a couple of things as a total noob to the world of cycling.

- The Giant CRX 4 (AT) approx $600 seems to be a safe choice in my sort of price range, given there’s a risk I’ll pack in the whole cycling thing after a few minutes/days/weeks. What other models should I look at for a test ride at this price for some choice/comparison?

- What are the absolutely necessary accessories to buy? I’ve currently got helmet, lights, pump & puncture repair kit on my list. I don’t want to go overboard with excess kit in case I don’t decide to continue regular riding.

- I’m assuming there’s a section here listing bike shops in certain areas… but in case there’s not, can someone recommend anywhere in the Melbourne CBD to go have a browse / test ride (I’ve already had a quick look at CBD Cycles on Bourke St)?

If all of this is covered in specific sections here, I apologise, and would appreciate it if you’d be so kind as to point me in the right direction(s) in favour of just telling me it’s out there.

Hmmm, that turned out quite long… sorry about that.

Cheers.

M.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby dajajaz » Sun Oct 10, 2010 9:13 pm

Hello All!, I have been riding for around 18 months and sadly feel I have outgrown my Giant OCR3, I would welcome the input of forum members into where to go next, I ride around 150-200km per week all on road and have a budget to around $2,500. I have looked at the Specialized Roubaix range but never having looked this seriously at what I am buying I need HELP!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby anonymous_ » Tue Oct 12, 2010 10:43 am

dajajaz wrote:Hello All!, I have been riding for around 18 months and sadly feel I have outgrown my Giant OCR3, I would welcome the input of forum members into where to go next, I ride around 150-200km per week all on road and have a budget to around $2,500. I have looked at the Specialized Roubaix range but never having looked this seriously at what I am buying I need HELP!



Hi

I have a Specialized Roubaix Elite for the last year and a bit and love it. Is all carbon with 105 gear. I have a compact double ring but you can get a triple - sometimes my legs wish I got the triple.

I have done the GVR and the Cycle Queensland rides without much drama.

The Roubaix is a more relaxed fit than a race bike ie you sit more upright but as i am 50 that suits me.

Only thing I would say is get new tyres straight away as the specialized ones that come with it are crap. I paid $3200 but have seen them now with the high dollar for as low as $2800
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby sagara0510 » Tue Oct 12, 2010 12:04 pm

hi guys

newbie here. sorry if i've posted in the wrong place but just looking for some direction.

bit of background, i'm not a cyclist. i'm a runner. but due to an injury, i've been benched indefinitely. So i've decided to give cycling a go mainly to maintain a level of fitness and to keep the beer gut at bay. the problem is, i've not rode a bike for over 10 years. all i have is a rusted mountain bike that i've had since my high school days (i'm 28) so i really have no idea where to start.

i used to love riding back in high school but i've never had a road bike and i'm a bit fearful of riding on the roads.

can anyone offer some advice to point me in the right direction?

Thanks!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby elStado » Wed Nov 03, 2010 3:10 pm

sagara0510 wrote:can anyone offer some advice to point me in the right direction?

Thanks!


Yeah,

Don't be fearful of riding, the number one rule when riding is to assume you are invisible, but act in an assertive manner.

-Don't swerve all over the place, ride defensively, always expect that a driver hasn't seen you (especially at intersections and roundabouts).

-Be aware of your surroundings. Act sensibly. Obey road rules.

-Ride safely, have lights on at all times (required by law at night), wear high visibility clothing, or at least bright clothing.

Dump that old rusted bike, it will cause more harm and problems that it is worth, as well as being dangerous. You don't need a $10,000 carbon fiber racing bike if you just want to cycle for fitness and/or commuting. If you want a nice road bike you could pick one up for around $2000-2500 (depending on your budget). If you want something good but cheaper you can still get pretty decent road bikes or flat bar road bikes for under $1000. Of course a more expensive bike will be faster, lighter and have generally have better components etc.

You will want to buy a pre-built and tuned bike from your Local Bike Shop (commonly referred to as LBS). They will be able to suggest some different bikes for you within your budget and needs. Make sure that you test ride the bike as long as possible and try a few different ones out before deciding on one. Make sure the bike is fitted properly to you size, otherwise it will get uncomfortable on longer rides (sore knees, back, legs, hands etc).

I would also recommend that you do your research not only on the bike (go look at them one day, do research, ask us, then go back to make your purchase/decision), but also on accessories you will need. You will want a decent helmet that is light and breathable, especially with this warmer weather approaching. Costs range from ~$100-300. You will also want a good set of lights for low visibility riding (remember required by law in low light/visibility conditions), You will also want to look at cleated pedals and shoes, I assume as you are riding for fitness you will want to ride longer distances rather than a quick jig down the street to the shops, so a good pair of riding shoes+pedals will make your rides much more enjoyable giving extra pedal power.

Bottom line: use common sense, do your research and feel free to participate here for insight and advice.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby GNU » Fri Nov 26, 2010 10:53 am

Hi Guys,

Just wondering what a fitout should include when you purchase a bike?

Dan
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby goneriding » Fri Nov 26, 2010 11:27 am

Depends on what you are going to be using the bike for (commuting, weekend, racing, etc).
Generally:
1. lights (front and rear)
2. tubes and levers and a bike bag to put them in.
3. pump and/or CO2
4. bell
5. water bottle cage
6. helmet
7. Most importantly get the bike fitted to you by the shop otherwise you could end up with knee, back, neck problems.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby elStado » Fri Nov 26, 2010 4:58 pm

Gloves are also really good, but you can get them down the track if you get sore hands.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby krazibone » Fri Dec 03, 2010 1:52 pm

From experience and the most important is test ride test ride test ride and test ride..

Find out what time of style you want to ride and create a list of bikes you want then visit as many LBS as possible and try all brands in your list

Research, research, research and research.. Forums and google are great resources, the more you know about bikes the more you can talk bikes with the sales assistant and most of the time you can catch them out lying to you.

My 2 cents
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby novice » Mon Dec 06, 2010 8:15 pm

I am lurking around bike shops looking at a possible purchase of my second bike.
One thing I have learned from the purchase of my first bike is make sure the LBS you choose to purchase your new bike from, has good back up service and check that they can source parts quickly and easily.
Nothing worse than having a bike stuck in the shop for repairs waiting days or weeks for parts to fix it.
I have a current model bike in the repair shop at the moment waiting on parts and have been off the road for a week.
It frustrates the hell out of me and many of the guys on this forum site will tell you of the horrible angst you feel when you can't go for a ride.
Especially if you are used to riding everyday.
Excuses are like arseholes! Everybody has one and they all stink! - Lance Armstrong .

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby deekrockingbeat » Fri Dec 17, 2010 9:49 am

the first bike i brought was the shougun samarui in 1999 for around $700 (which was stolen recently). i rode it on and off until 2007 when i purchased an Anvanti giro second hand for $900. i have to say i never really like the shougun because the frame was abit too big for me (but it never stopped the LBS saleperson trying to sell it to me because it was one of their last shouguns for sell) i didnt know much about bikes during my 1st purchase (i was young), and i felt i wouldve done alittle more riding if i was more comfortable on it. (i'm only 176cm and the bike had a 58cm frame i think, which apparantly suits riders 180cm plus). I just wasnt very nimble riding the thing and didnt ride much towards the end until i got the anvanti.

for my second purchase, the frame was the most important thing and i love riding it, i can balance on the thing, get around and nip in and out and feels like a feature compare to the previous bike. the only thing is that it has 3 chainwheels in front, i never use the small one so that is just extra weight im carrying.

learning by expereince i guess :D
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby elStado » Thu Dec 23, 2010 2:59 am

deekrockingbeat wrote:for my second purchase, the frame was the most important thing and i love riding it, i can balance on the thing, get around and nip in and out and feels like a feature compare to the previous bike. the only thing is that it has 3 chainwheels in front, i never use the small one so that is just extra weight im carrying.

learning by expereince i guess :D


Dump it all and go single speed. :wink:
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Re:

Postby Nufel » Wed Jan 05, 2011 11:41 pm




BIG thanks Mika ;-) its what I'm looking from long time for
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