How hard is it to change the inner tube?

Workshop tales, trials and disasters.
Maintenance tips, techniques and myths.
Technical discussion, description and outright lies

How hard is it to change the inner tube?

Postby peter » Sun Dec 23, 2007 9:29 am

Yeah, as the title says. I was about to go for a ride, noticed a flat front tyre which was strange as it was fine last week. Pumping more air doesn't help, so looks like a punctured tube.

This means I have to visit the LBS to get a new tube and some levers, but should I just ask them to do it? I've read how-to on the web but never done it before, I thought it would be beneficial to be able to do this kind of thing.
User avatar
peter
 
Posts: 958
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2007 6:39 pm
Location: sydney

by BNA » Sun Dec 23, 2007 9:37 am

BNA
 

Postby s-s-a » Sun Dec 23, 2007 9:37 am

Oh yes this is something you need to learn. And you need to carry a spare tube and levers and pump while riding.

Park Tools have a fabulous how-to section on their website here is the section on tyre and inner tube replacement.

Steph
User avatar
s-s-a
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:35 pm
Location: Canberra

Postby sogood » Sun Dec 23, 2007 10:11 am

It's not a difficult procedure and practice makes perfect. Going to the LBS each time for tube repair would kill the fun of cycling. Learn it yourself.

One more thing, learn to patch your tubes and be good to the environment.
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16896
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby peter » Sun Dec 23, 2007 1:32 pm

My LBS showed me how to do it, it wasn't too bad.

Yeah I will be patching the old tube so I have a spare one.
User avatar
peter
 
Posts: 958
Joined: Sun Nov 25, 2007 6:39 pm
Location: sydney

Postby Halfanewb » Sun Dec 23, 2007 3:22 pm

Yea carrying a basic flat kit is the way to go, include a small square of sandpaper and a bit of chalk.

Spare tube for the first flat and a puncture repair kit for that second flat when you find after pumping the new tube up that the , wire, glass, nail etc is still in the tire or in your hurry to get the tire inflated you have ripped the valve stem away from the tube :)

For those of us who ride light tires a spare $5 note is handy too. If the sidewall of the tire gets a slice in it that will plug the hole long enough to get you home.

One tip is to mount your tires on the wheels with the tire decal starting at the valve stem this way when you find the puncture on the tube you will know roughly where on the tire you need to look for embedded objects or a hole.

Happy trails :)
Halfanewb
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Feb 15, 2007 6:49 pm
Location: Brisbane

Postby stryker84 » Sun Dec 23, 2007 10:16 pm

[quote="sogood"]It's not a difficult procedure and practice makes perfect. Going to the LBS each time for tube repair would kill the fun of cycling.[quote]
Plus it's expensive to boot! Got caught out on one of my early rides without a pump AND spare tube/patch. Bit the bullet and pulled into a nearby LBS, $20 later...

Reminds me, I need to change my rear tube, and check the tyre/rim while I'm at it. I thought I did that last time, but the new tube went flat within the week, so probably some tiny slowleak-causing nasty in there somewhere...
stryker84
 
Posts: 1817
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 8:38 pm
Location: Warrnambool

Postby X-wing » Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:08 pm

Neat tip Halfa, I'll add that into my 'wise things to think about on the side of the road' log.

cheers!
User avatar
X-wing
 
Posts: 701
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: Penrith, NSW

Postby s-s-a » Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:46 pm

One tip is to mount your tires on the wheels with the tire decal starting at the valve stem this way when you find the puncture on the tube you will know roughly where on the tire you need to look for embedded objects or a hole.


I always mount my tyres with the valve stem in the middle of the tyre label. A LBS showed me this trick.

I also never use the locking rings or caps on my Presta valves.

Steph
User avatar
s-s-a
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:35 pm
Location: Canberra

Postby sogood » Mon Dec 24, 2007 2:58 pm

s-s-a wrote:I also never use the locking rings or caps on my Presta valves.

Question is, is there a value for keeping the cap on? Dirt? Mud?
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16896
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby s-s-a » Mon Dec 24, 2007 3:58 pm

If I used Schrader valves I would put the cap on if there was a chance of mud (I have put the caps on my daughter's bike).

But with Presta valves any mud just cakes on the outside and is easy to get rid of. The only use I have for the caps is on my spare tubes so that the valve doesn't rub and make a hole.

Steph
User avatar
s-s-a
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:35 pm
Location: Canberra

Postby sogood » Mon Dec 24, 2007 4:14 pm

s-s-a wrote:But with Presta valves any mud just cakes on the outside and is easy to get rid of. The only use I have for the caps is on my spare tubes so that the valve doesn't rub and make a hole.

Hehe... Maybe the fact that I keep those caps on can de-classify me as a weight weenie. :D
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16896
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby europa » Mon Dec 24, 2007 5:58 pm

The plastic cap can also protect that wee pin in the valve. Mud might flick off easily but you'll never get it completely clean and that dirt goes into the valve when you pump it up. I can't really see an argument for not having the cap, though the arguments for them aren't that strong either as you've shown by not using the caps.

The lock nuts are an interesting one - something much blamed for valve failures. I don't use them either, but mainly because I've changed to Michelin tubes which don't have them to start with.

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby sogood » Mon Dec 24, 2007 10:31 pm

europa wrote:The lock nuts are an interesting one - something much blamed for valve failures. I don't use them either, but mainly because I've changed to Michelin tubes which don't have them to start with.

My floor pump has a habit of bending them. Yet again, I am not sure if it's the pump or me that's bending them. :roll:
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16896
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Kid_Carbine » Tue Dec 25, 2007 7:43 am

It's not the pump.

I always run caps on my valves. It's not gluggy mud that's the problem, but muddy water. Centrifugal force in a rotating wheel means that the water goes to the lowest point [deep inside the valve] & even if it dries, the dirt is still in there ready to do it's insideous work the next time a pump is fitted.

I have also seen damaged pins in Presta valves, but if caps are used, it is protected. [I use metal caps on both Presta & Woods valves]
Carbine & SJH cycles, & Quicksilver BMX
Now that's AUSTRALIAN to the core.
User avatar
Kid_Carbine
 
Posts: 1297
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:35 pm
Location: Southern Highlands N.S.W.

Postby Mulger bill » Tue Dec 25, 2007 5:57 pm

Woods valves? :?

Where do you score metal Presta caps please Kid?

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25544
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby Kid_Carbine » Tue Dec 25, 2007 10:03 pm

Woods valve, bicycle valve, Dunlop valve. It's what was in use in bike tubes for about 90 years before the car valve [Schrader] replaced it in general use. It uses the same thread as the Presta valve but is cut off square at the top & uses a much shorter cap.

The metal caps were sourced from bike shops all over the SE quarter of NSW back in the early 80's & they had been discontinued & replaced with plastic long before that. I keep a private stash for future use, but keep in mind that they are appropriate for the much earlier bikes that I have.
Sheldon Brown link to valve page.

About the only place I have seen any recently was on eBay.

This is a new tube with a Woods valve & metal cap. This particular one was made for use in a Westwood type rim as the metal flange at the base is shaped to support the valve in the well of this particular rim shape.

Image

Below you will find, left to right a metal presta valve cap, next, a Woods valve without the surgical tubing plus the lock ring & standard metal cap.
On the right is a Woods valve with surgical tubing in place, making it serviceable. If you have ever bought a puncture repair outfit & found these short pieces of tubing in them, then you now know what they're for.
The captive metal cap was just another type.

Image
Carbine & SJH cycles, & Quicksilver BMX
Now that's AUSTRALIAN to the core.
User avatar
Kid_Carbine
 
Posts: 1297
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:35 pm
Location: Southern Highlands N.S.W.

Postby mikesbytes » Tue Dec 25, 2007 11:01 pm

Are Woods / Dunlop valves still being used?
A helmet saved my life
User avatar
mikesbytes
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 14718
Joined: Thu Dec 01, 2005 10:42 pm
Location: Tempe, Sydney

Postby Mulger bill » Tue Dec 25, 2007 11:07 pm

Dunlop valves :idea: Had those on me first three bikes as a kid, Thanks Kid :)
Pity about the metal cap availability, your fleet deserves them, will suss out ebay.

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
London Boy 29/12/2011
User avatar
Mulger bill
Super Mod
Super Mod
 
Posts: 25544
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 2:41 pm
Location: Sunbury Vic

Postby Kid_Carbine » Tue Dec 25, 2007 11:31 pm

mikesbytes wrote:Are Woods / Dunlop valves still being used?

Well I still use them, so I guess the answer is yes.

EDIT.
OK, I'm not well, bad RTI & bizarre shoulder injury means I am seriously sleep deprived, so I didn't pick up on what I suspect that you mean.
I guess you mean, .... are they still sold new in Australia [or elsewhere]

No, ... new tubes with Woods valves are not readily available through the trade in Australia, although a new [old stock] one shows up in old bike shops on rare occasions. Many of these tubes are made of actual rubber & these eventually deteriorate to the point where they just break up in your hands, but the newer ones made from more modern synthetic materials will last for many years yet.
My last red rubber one [made untill the late 30's] has gone to god & was disposed of thoughtfully about a while ago.

I hear tell that the Woods valves are still being used in some Asian countries, but have no way to verify that.
Last edited by Kid_Carbine on Wed Dec 26, 2007 3:02 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Carbine & SJH cycles, & Quicksilver BMX
Now that's AUSTRALIAN to the core.
User avatar
Kid_Carbine
 
Posts: 1297
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:35 pm
Location: Southern Highlands N.S.W.

Postby sogood » Wed Dec 26, 2007 4:43 am

Kid_Carbine wrote:Well I still use them, so I guess the answer is yes.

Forget those phoney steel bike riders. You are the true traditionalist! :shock:
Bianchi, Ridley, Montague, GT, Garmin and All things Apple :)
RK wrote:And that is Wikipedia - I can write my own definition.
User avatar
sogood
 
Posts: 16896
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 7:31 am
Location: Sydney AU

Postby Kid_Carbine » Wed Dec 26, 2007 3:01 pm

Thanks, I'll take that as a compliment. [I hope] LOL
Others might say that I'm too stupid to get with the times, but I like your version better.
Carbine & SJH cycles, & Quicksilver BMX
Now that's AUSTRALIAN to the core.
User avatar
Kid_Carbine
 
Posts: 1297
Joined: Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:35 pm
Location: Southern Highlands N.S.W.

Postby toolonglegs » Wed Dec 26, 2007 4:08 pm

Kid_Carbine wrote:
Image

My wife walked past me looking at these things (that i can remember from 10 speed days) and accussed me of looking at torture instruments...no dear they are from a bike :roll:
Image
User avatar
toolonglegs
 
Posts: 14327
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2007 7:49 pm
Location: Somewhere with padded walls and really big hills!

Postby 531db » Wed Dec 26, 2007 5:51 pm

Woods valves were still in use in India the early 1990's and afaik are in use there today on those 28" heavy roadster bikes.
531db
 
Posts: 969
Joined: Mon Nov 20, 2006 6:25 pm
Location: Riding a real steel bike - somewhere!

Postby europa » Wed Dec 26, 2007 8:18 pm

Remember trying to scrape perished rubber off those old valves? :?

Richard
I had a good bike ... so I fixed it
User avatar
europa
 
Posts: 7327
Joined: Sun Jul 16, 2006 10:51 am
Location: southern end of Adelaide - home of hills, fixies and drop bears

Postby mikeg » Wed Dec 26, 2007 10:31 pm

I used a version of the Woods Valve that did not use the rubber tube. worked sort of like the car valves and was a lot easier to get air into the tyre than the rubber versions.

Image

Mike
mikeg
 
Posts: 518
Joined: Sat May 26, 2007 7:25 pm
Location: NW Sydney

Next

Return to The Shed

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU



InTouch with BNA
“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter