Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Beating the system - the cycling commuting section

Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby westab » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:04 pm

Ohboganers - passengers in cars that pass you with the window down and shout out OH when just off your shoulder. They are generally showing their Intelligence (or lack of) by their extensive vocabulary, they also think they are the first to do this :roll: and are making jump out of your skin because you didn't hear the car :? . They can also throw things out the window at you but with their great grasp of physics is usually land about 10m in front of you even though it only travelled 2m sideways. The car is usually driven by a bogan as mention above.
Last edited by westab on Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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by BNA » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:12 pm

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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Comedian » Tue Dec 14, 2010 8:12 pm

Mother Duck : This is where a hardcore biker decides to help his partner (usually female) into commuting. He/She will be dressed often in full kit, and will often be carrying seemingly a trailer load of stuff in a backpack for said partner. You'll pick him/her because they will be riding along ridiculously slowly, and will be constantly looking over their shoulder at their expiring partner. Also often seen stopped at the top of a hill looking back with a exasperated expression while partner dressed in civies slowly climbs the hill.
Once you can climb hills on a bike it's all downhill. :mrgreen:

Hopefully I'll know what that's like..... one day. :shock: :lol:

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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby fatherofmany » Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:47 am

So similar Comedian to

The Father Figure
- The fully kitted weekend warrior often seen stopped at the top of a hill looking back with a exasperated expression while the rest of the cycling newbies he's riding with slowly climb the hill.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby fatherofmany » Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:53 am

Then there's the Swiss Army Cyclist - like it's namesake the Swiss Army Knife, this rider has every conceivable (and not always so useful) attachment to his/her bicycle. Seat bag, multiple water bottle holders holing multiple water bottles, lights, bells, mudguards, racks and panniers, pumps, cycle computer, including cadence and heart monitors, mirrors, side stand, reflectors, ad infinitum. This wouldn't be so bad if they were kitting out for a 3 week across the state and back tour but their commute is only 3km.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby CommuRider » Wed Dec 15, 2010 11:56 am

fatherofmany wrote:Then there's the Swiss Army Cyclist - like it's namesake the Swiss Army Knife, this rider has every conceivable (and not always so useful) attachment to his/her bicycle. Seat bag, multiple water bottle holders holing multiple water bottles, lights, bells, mudguards, racks and panniers, pumps, cycle computer, including cadence and heart monitors, mirrors, side stand, reflectors, ad infinitum. This wouldn't be so bad if they were kitting out for a 3 week across the state and back tour but their commute is only 3km.


:lol:

But the true Swiss army cyclist would have a fold-on bike and can fit all his/her gear in their pockets. Or one carry-on luggage in this case.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Fletcher » Wed Dec 15, 2010 12:58 pm

fatherofmany wrote:Then there's the Swiss Army Cyclist - like it's namesake the Swiss Army Knife, this rider has every conceivable (and not always so useful) attachment to his/her bicycle. Seat bag, multiple water bottle holders holing multiple water bottles, lights, bells, mudguards, racks and panniers, pumps, cycle computer, including cadence and heart monitors, mirrors, side stand, reflectors, ad infinitum. This wouldn't be so bad if they were kitting out for a 3 week across the state and back tour but their commute is only 3km.


:lol:
Most excellent. Can I add top tube bag & head tube bag into the mix? Swiss Army Cylcist needs to carry at least four spare tubes, chain and cassette, coz you just never know..
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby westab » Fri Dec 17, 2010 11:43 am

The sidewinder - This rider is one who you see on th road and shared pathways who is usually lisening to their IPod / MP3 player with or without any hands on the handlebars and is winding all over the road. They often are sing along but they all have next to no idea of what is going on around them. You may try to let them know you are about to pass but they won't hear you either due to hearing damage or the music. They are often not wearing helmets.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby trailgumby » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:37 pm

westab wrote:The sidewinder - This rider is one who you see on th road and shared pathways who is usually lisening to their IPod / MP3 player with or without any hands on the handlebars and is winding all over the road. They often are sing along but they all have next to no idea of what is going on around them. You may try to let them know you are about to pass but they won't hear you either due to hearing damage or the music. They are often not wearing helmets.


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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby trailgumby » Fri Dec 17, 2010 12:44 pm

The Ego 500 n. What a cyclist wins after he is dropped by a fitter cyclist on a steep or extended climb, only to pass him again at the end of the following descent after pedalling furiously the whole way.

Example: Fitter cyclist to said Fred: "Congratulations, you've just won the Ego 500."
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby ALAN Roadie » Fri Mar 04, 2011 1:58 pm

Sorry to drag up an old one, but this has been hilarious. love the Supanova. Gold. What about The DRAFTEE - the guy / gal that you have never met in your life that sits on your back wheel the whole way up an extended climb and never once offers to take the lead for a stretch.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby itsaghostcar » Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:01 pm

ALAN Roadie wrote:The DRAFTEE
I'd go for Wind Tunnel Tester

I'll add the Anne Boleyn - the confused rider who has 'lost their head' and have hung their helmet on the handlebars to protect their headset instead
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Fred Nurk » Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:51 pm

il padrone wrote:
simonn wrote:Thought of this on the way to work...

The Yo-yo

Usually a new-ish rider competing cat 6 and/or in the TdC over rolling hill kind-of terrain. Tailgates downhill (probably thinking they are drafting?), starts dropping back on the flat-ish bit then properly drops back going up hill, catches up on the down hill again rinse repeat.

If he catches you on the downhill you're not going hard enough :P

Hillclimbs are the great circuit-breaker, letting you drop any drafters.


They're also a great source of embarassment when they drop you up hills. On a particularly weary commute in on the morning, got dropped by some clown on an electric assisted moped whilst climbing the only hill on my inbound route. The fact I caught and passed them afterwards is a small consolation, if any.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Mulger bill » Sat Mar 05, 2011 2:31 pm

Fred Nurk wrote:They're also a great source of embarassment when they drop you up hills. On a particularly weary commute in on the morning, got dropped by some clown on an electric assisted moped whilst climbing the only hill on my inbound route. The fact I caught and passed them afterwards is a small consolation, if any.

That's bulldust Fred, no shame in being passed by Fabcycle riders unless you can see the battery leads dangling.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Livetoride » Thu Mar 10, 2011 1:15 pm

Comedian wrote:Mother Duck : This is where a hardcore biker decides to help his partner (usually female) into commuting. He/She will be dressed often in full kit, and will often be carrying seemingly a trailer load of stuff in a backpack for said partner. You'll pick him/her because they will be riding along ridiculously slowly, and will be constantly looking over their shoulder at their expiring partner. Also often seen stopped at the top of a hill looking back with a exasperated expression while partner dressed in civies slowly climbs the hill.

LOL Man thats funny, most of those descriptions are of me and my wife, especially the civies and climbing the hill... Good rides though but funny :D :D
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Comedian » Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:07 am

Being Chicked : This is where a male cyclist has his doors sucked off by a "chick". This can be very traumatic for the male cyclist.

I can't claim credit for this though. I saw this on Lisa Jacobs hilarious "Ride Happy" blog. Hat tip to Lisa's Mum.

Dear Lisa's Mum,
I desperately seek your counsel. Yesterday, I was the victim of a traumatic incident. I was out riding and this cyclist came past me and almost sucked my helmet off. I chased for a while, then just as I was about to give up the cyclist turned around and it was a GIRL! I have never been passed by anyone before other than that guy at work who trains really hard and is going to race the Gatorade triathlon series in the Summer with other elite athletes. I am a happily married diesel mechanic with 4 children and I love steak and AC/DC, but this has compromised my manhood. What should I do?

Horrified,
Williamstown


Dear Horrified

I believe your experience is what is known in common parlance as ‘being chicked’. Don't be too hard on yourself. Some of my best friends are chicks, although I never let them ride with me because they half-wheel and have no respect for wicker baskets. My advice to you is that next time you feel in danger of being chicked, just feign a rear wheel puncture and pull over with a concerned look. If the chick offers to help, insist gallantly that she ride on, because changing a tube IS a man's job, after all. If the chick is a friend of yours, you can follow up later on with an explanation of the diabolical mechanical that prevented you ripping her legs off, which is, you can explain, what would have happened on any other day if only you hadn't punctured.


http://ridehappy.blogspot.com/2010/11/letter-of-week-to-lisas-mum.html
Once you can climb hills on a bike it's all downhill. :mrgreen:

Hopefully I'll know what that's like..... one day. :shock: :lol:

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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby ft_critical » Sun Mar 13, 2011 1:27 pm

There is a faint whirring; is that someone behind you? But you won't look, you won't give the game away. Accelerate, he accelerates. Change up, he changes up. You can just hear his bike as the wind shifts. Damn he is good, you are nearly at the redline. Good enough for you to turn and have a look at him now. No-one there, just an empty road.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby baarg » Mon Mar 14, 2011 11:27 am

ft_critical wrote:There is a faint whirring; is that someone behind you? But you won't look, you won't give the game away. Accelerate, he accelerates. Change up, he changes up. You can just hear his bike as the wind shifts. Damn he is good, you are nearly at the redline. Good enough for you to turn and have a look at him now. No-one there, just an empty road.
Derailleur Drafter – A paranoid-egotistic psychosis causing you to race the noises from your own derailleur.


This made me chuckle. I'm guilty of this :oops:
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Rhubarb » Mon Mar 14, 2011 2:58 pm

I love this thread. I have at least 6 of these described characters on my route and have probably been called a few of them as well (supernova and reflecto man come to mind).

Can I add "Pinnochio" as in the boy who wouldn't grow up. I often see a guy who appears to be in his mid forties but rides bmx with skater style clothes and helmet.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Livetoride » Mon Mar 14, 2011 4:30 pm

ft_critical wrote:There is a faint whirring; is that someone behind you? But you won't look, you won't give the game away. Accelerate, he accelerates. Change up, he changes up. You can just hear his bike as the wind shifts. Damn he is good, you are nearly at the redline. Good enough for you to turn and have a look at him now. No-one there, just an empty road.
Derailleur Drafter – A paranoid-egotistic psychosis causing you to race the noises from your own derailleur.

I once raced a rider who sat RIGHT on my back wheel no matter how hard I rode he/she was a machine. I never looked round at him/her didn't want them to know I was exhausted. Wished I did cause when I did look, I realized it was my own shadow. Had a good laugh at myself. :shock: :shock:
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Rhubarb » Tue Mar 15, 2011 9:16 pm

ft_critical wrote:There is a faint whirring; is that someone behind you? But you won't look, you won't give the game away. Accelerate, he accelerates. Change up, he changes up. You can just hear his bike as the wind shifts. Damn he is good, you are nearly at the redline. Good enough for you to turn and have a look at him now. No-one there, just an empty road.
Derailleur Drafter – A paranoid-egotistic psychosis causing you to race the noises from your own derailleur.


Nice - Could also be known as "Ghost Rider"
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby jasonc » Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:51 am

new one from a workmate

MAMIL Middle Aged Man In Lycra
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Rhubarb » Mon Mar 28, 2011 1:46 pm

jasonc wrote:new one from a workmate

MAMIL Middle Aged Man In Lycra


And the bad news is that you progress from there into a MOBIL..... Miserable Old Bastard In Lycra. That's my new goal anyway :)
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby GraemeL » Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:19 pm

CommuRider wrote:
ft_critical wrote:The Super Nova: The clown who rides on a narrow Multi-use Path with dual 240,000 lumens handlebar mounted retina erasing lights, one helmet mounted 4,000,000 lumens death star beacon, and 15 epilepsy inducing red disco strobe lights on the seat post.


LOL. I just *need* those rear strobe lights.


:mrgreen: I have them as well. I like to be seen.
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Re: Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby queequeg » Mon Apr 04, 2011 3:10 pm

GraemeL wrote:
CommuRider wrote:
ft_critical wrote:The Super Nova: The clown who rides on a narrow Multi-use Path with dual 240,000 lumens handlebar mounted retina erasing lights, one helmet mounted 4,000,000 lumens death star beacon, and 15 epilepsy inducing red disco strobe lights on the seat post.


LOL. I just *need* those rear strobe lights.


:mrgreen: I have them as well. I like to be seen.


Well, with DST ending, I spent the weekend converting my bike into the SupaNova. Now have three sets of flashing red lights (Knog Skink, Planet Bike Super Flash, Planet Bike Rack Blinky 5) for the rear. I have a Knog Beetle on the front, which will now be totally outshone by the two sets of AyUps attached to the front (One Intermediate, One Narrow). I also have an Exelite LumiSash jut in case anyone "can't see me".
The first motorists that gives me a "SMIDSY" may well go blind when they get those AyUps in their eyes, along with "Can you see me now?....What about now????"

I make no apologies for being visible in the dark. The amount of respect that the AyUps get me is amazing. I must look like a freight train coming down the road!
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Aussie Dictionary of Commuter Slang

Postby Max » Mon Apr 04, 2011 6:46 pm

queequeg wrote:The first motorists that gives ne a "SMIDSY" may well go blind when they get those AyUps in their eyes, along with "Can you see me now?....What about now????"


:mrgreen: thanks for the chuckle!

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