Polishing an anodised wheel

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Polishing an anodised wheel

Postby MountGower » Tue Jan 22, 2008 10:39 pm

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by BNA » Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:29 pm

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Postby MountGower » Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:29 pm

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Postby Birdman » Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:52 pm

I wondered then wondered against wondering.

I knew it wouldn't go ahead, anodising itself is a rather long process and is actually quite a strong resilient finish. It would take alot of work to get it back bare.

But hey if you don't want the rims (as i figured you were going to alter their nice appearance), i'll take em off ya hands.

Mitch.
SOME PEOPLE ARE LIKE SLINKYS. NOT REALLY GOOD FOR ANYTHING BUT THEY BRING A SMILE TO YOUR FACE WHEN PUSHED DOWN THE STAIRS.

Until next time...
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Postby tallywhacker » Wed Jan 23, 2008 12:56 pm

I have had much success with oven cleaner on things like stems, brakes, seat posts. Leave the oven cleaner on for about 10-15 mintes then rinse with water very well. I tried the same trick with an old anodised rim and it didn't work, just discolored the rim. There are different types of anodising and I think with rims they hard anodise them which gives a thicker coating. On the other hand I used paint stripper on an old painted Velocity deep v. Beautiful.
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Postby Hawkeye » Thu Jan 24, 2008 5:29 pm

Anodising is an electrochemical process whereby the item to be coated (the cathode) is put in an electolyte bath, connected to a DC current supply, and the material it will be coated with similarly inserted and connected to the opposite pole (the anode).

You will not easily remove anodising with oven cleaner as it is a metal compound itself.
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Postby tallywhacker » Fri Jan 25, 2008 1:22 am

j.r.hawkins wrote:Anodising is an electrochemical process whereby the item to be coated (the cathode) is put in an electolyte bath, connected to a DC current supply, and the material it will be coated with similarly inserted and connected to the opposite pole (the anode).

You will not easily remove anodising with oven cleaner as it is a metal compound itself.

not really (that is plating), anodising is a process that increases the thickness of the natural oxide layer on the surface of the aluminium.
The anodized aluminium layer is grown by passing a direct current through an electrolytic solution, with the aluminum object serving as the anode (the positive electrode). The current releases hydrogen at the cathode (the negative electrode) and oxygen at the surface of the aluminum anode, creating a build-up of aluminum oxide.

Depending upon the type of anodising it is quite easily remove with oven cleaner (sodium hyrdoxide 5%). Spray, leave 10-15 minutes, wash and then sand (800-1200) and polish. Easy peasy

the brake was anodised black, stem was grey, cranks were grey, rear cog black, calipers were blue
Image
was standard grey/silver anodised finish
Image
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