Brake pads; a review and that manner of thing.

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Brake pads; a review and that manner of thing.

Postby McPete » Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:09 am

In recent weeks, I'd been noticing my brake pads were wearing thin on my STP, so I began shopping around looking for the best prices on Avid Juicy series pads. My mates encouraged me to jump on fleabay and look for EBC "red" pads, as they were running to great success.

However, I ended up buying from Discobrakes.com, and their "red compound" pads. These pads, they claimed had a very high density compared to my stock pads and would provide extra braking power, and an extended life over my original pads. So I ordered a set, $53 for two pairs and shipping.

It took several days for the money to be withdrawn from my account, and more than a week for the pads to arrive. When they did, they were wrapped in brown paper, reinforced by fiber tape, and packaged inside small blister packs, each containing two brake pads that had in fact been painted red, a spring (as required in Juicy Series brakes) and a pair of stickers, one from Discobrakes, and another from Carboncycles, an associated site.


After much fiddling I finally got them installed, and I've had them in about a day. There was a small amount of rub to begin with, but as the brakes have started to wear in, I'm noticing huge amounts of stopping power arriving. Under heavy braking, the bike will pick up a back wheel quite easily, which it did not do without severe provocation on the old pads.

Aside from the shipping time, I'm fairly happy, considering that a simmilar product sold from my LBS goes for $50 an end as opposed to $23 and end.
P.
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by BNA » Sun Feb 10, 2008 12:41 pm

BNA
 

Postby Kalgrm » Sun Feb 10, 2008 12:41 pm

Got a link for future reference? When the time comes, I might look at them.

Cheers,
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Postby McPete » Sun Feb 10, 2008 7:47 pm

http://www.discobrakes.com/?s=0&t=0&c=2&p=105&

They do squeal a bit when wet, but they still stop crazily well, so far at least. I love them.
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Postby Hawkeye » Sun Feb 10, 2008 8:33 pm

Thanks for that. Duly filed under Favourites. Better than paying $75 an end for Hayes original replacements.

Let us know what they do to your discs wear-wise too.

I have Hayes 9 on my commuter, and have found that the discs wear along with the pads. They don't have an infinite life. I reckon by about halfway through the third set of original Hayes pads you'd have trashed them.

And that brings up an interesting little quirk I found. Hayes pads are a little wider than the braking surface, and you really have to watch the section where the pads overlap onto the spokes by about 1.5mm.

That section of the pad doesn't wear as fast and forms a nice little lip that can end up cutting through your disc rotor spokes, I reckon by about midway thru the second pad set. Result: the disc face cut free from your wheel and you got no brakes. :x

I've now taken to chamfering that part of the pad off prior to installation with a dremel or hobby knife.
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Postby Mulger bill » Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:49 pm

Thanks for that Pete, faved. :)

Shaun
...whatever the road rules, self-preservation is the absolute priority for a cyclist when mixing it with motorised traffic.
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Postby Hawkeye » Tue Feb 12, 2008 9:39 pm

I've currently got a set of T7's Alligator pads in both ends of my commuter as replacement for the well past worn out original set I had in there.

Tonight I was distracted by my wife's cheery hello while she was trimming the front hedge and almost overshot the driveway :lol: , and then grabbed a fistful of brakes.

Urrrgh! :x The noise the pads made, and they didn't exactly pull me up that quick either! :roll:

Has anyone else tried Alligator pads? What were they like for you?
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Postby Whitz End » Wed Feb 13, 2008 8:33 am

I was thinking of going the EBC reds for my Juicy Fives...think I might just check this out!

My other brakeset consists of a set of Goodridge equipped Hayes Nines. According to the prophecy, its preferable to run a metallic pad in one side of the caliper and the organic type int he other to increase modulation...thats for use with the Goodridges I think.
I too use the Alligator set but have never had any issues what so ever. Lasted for ages too. I can only compare to the stock Hayes pads in my old Mechanical brakes which were attrocious but these have been great....maybe your pads/rotor are contaminated?
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Postby Kalgrm » Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:54 am

That's interesting Angus. I'm running Goodridge sintered pads (both sides) on both my Avid BB7s and my Hayes FX9 brake sets and I find them very effective. My modulation feels fine, especially on the Hayes hydraulic brakes. I'll keep in mind your thoughts though.

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Graeme
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Postby Whitz End » Thu Feb 14, 2008 9:05 am

I guess what they are getting at with the idea is that the organic pad will have more 'give' in it when its under compression.
Modulation in reality comes down to many more factors like actual caliper/lever flex, how much air is in the lines and so on. Its hard to gauge with discs as you cant angle the pads or anything like you can with V-brakes.

My understanding of modulation is how much 'range' you have in the brake after you have first applied it untill the pads have hit the rotor untill the point where they lock up. The Hayes have a fairly short 'range' untill they lock...often refered to as the 'on/off' feel. The Juicys however, have a fair amount of throw from the point where they have first engauged to when they finally lock.

Like I said, I havent owned Hayes hydraulics in the past so I cant compare. But it is a fantastic brake. I like the 'on/off' feel of the Hayes, more so then the Juicy. Just gives me a little more confidance (well, when I have tread on my tires that is!)...my only complains are that the lever pivot sticks out miles on the Hayes...the Juicys have a more natural position...plus they give a heap of modulation after the brake has initially engauged.

Went off on a bit of a tangent didnt I...?
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