Stoves and Cookwear

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby PawPaw » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:08 pm

il padrone wrote:
PawPaw wrote:Suppose I'll just keep using shellite, though it sucks they charge $5/litre.

Cheaper than Scotch :P


and bananas
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by BNA » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:22 pm

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:22 pm

PawPaw wrote:thx riffraff. was aware of the crap in unleaded, but it still appears to be used commonly by trekkers globally, and motorbike campers.
I presumed if I kept my head 3 feet upwind from the flame, and used a wok, contamination of the food and me would be minimal.

The Coleman Peak One doesn't have alternative jets for different fuels. I still have the box and instruction sheet. Great product, though heavi-ish.
AFAIK, white spirit = shellite = Coleman fuel, and is amongst the lightest and cleanest product of the fractionation process.

Suppose I'll just keep using shellite, though it sucks they charge $5/litre.

Hi PawPaw,
be grateful your not in NZ where prices of $15 litre arnt unheard of.
I'm glad to be home in Aus where the prices are chump change by comparison.
I was blown away being able to get kero and metho for under $4 litre.
My last purchase was 3x1 litre bottles for $9 on special at Go-low. (3 bottles for $9)
I couldnt get 2 for that price in NZ of either. :D
I did look seriously at the coleman stoves when I was in the market for my first liquid fuel stove but being lazy and a procrastinator
I liked that I could snap the lid closed on the Optimus and clean it the following day (or day after that ........etc) with no detriment
to the inside of my pack and belongings.
The Peak One does have a good following though and I came across many satisfied customers in my travels.
My cookware for the Optimus is my well worn, currently 15 year old, stainless Peak 1 set of four small pots that fit inside each other.
Thats how seriously I looked at purchasing one of their stoves. :D
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby PawPaw » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:40 pm

rifraf wrote:The Peak One does have a good following though and I came across many satisfied customers in my travels.
My cookware for the Optimus is my well worn, currently 15 year old, stainless Peak 1 set of four small pots that fit inside each other.
Thats how seriously I looked at purchasing one of their stoves. :D


When I bought my Peak One (1979ish), I did a lot of research....The MSR Whisperlite was the duck's nuts then amongst trekkers and mountaineers, but it was about 4x the price of the Peak, which I couldn't justify.
Funny you mention all those pots. I only ever took one, but I mainly bushwalked solo or with 1-2 others. Mainly used on dried meals and caffeine.

I'd like to get my hands on some new breed US and Australian Army rations. They apparently cook in the pack when you break a seal or something, so no need for a stove.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Tue Dec 20, 2011 9:54 pm

RonK wrote:My favourite Chefsway dehydrated meals are not the rehydrate in the pouch type, and have to be simmered in 700ml of water I find the Chefsway (from Tasmania) products very palatable and their low packed weight and small size makes it easy to carry a weeks supply without resorting to a trailer. The spag bol is my favourite, but my wife loves the mushroom risotto. I alway buy the double serve size and find it's an adequate serving for two and a very generous serving for one, but just what I need after a long day on the bike or hike.
BTW, I reckon it's a myth that freeze-died meals are expensive - if you cost the ingredients and the time it takes to prepare and dry your own meals there is not much difference.


Ron tell me those Chefsway meals arnt $17.76 each for dogs sake :shock:
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby il padrone » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:05 pm

PawPaw wrote:Funny you mention all those pots. I only ever took one, but I mainly bushwalked solo or with 1-2 others. Mainly used on dried meals and caffeine.

I'd like to get my hands on some new breed US and Australian Army rations. They apparently cook in the pack when you break a seal or something, so no need for a stove.

Funny thing about meals. I prefer putting a bit in to get a meal that tastes pretty good and has less 'cardboard' quality to it.

How my cycling mates and I run a bush camp cook-up :D

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:17 pm

From your regular pics and posts IP,
it sounds like you belong to a great group that has a lot of
"get out there"
I'm sure the enthusiasm is contagious. :D
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:19 pm

Aushiker wrote:Hi

I have just got back from four days riding

Andrew

Hi Andrew
Did you take your new stove?
How did it perform and what culinary delights did you whip up?
Solo ride or did you take company?
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby il padrone » Tue Dec 20, 2011 10:28 pm

rifraf wrote:From your regular pics and posts IP,
it sounds like you belong to a great group that has a lot of
"get out there"
I'm sure the enthusiasm is contagious. :D

Yep. Melbourne Bicycle Touring Club - we run 1-3 rides per weekend, usually 1-2 camping tours per month and regular longer tours, especially Christmas, Easter and Melbourne Cup Day weekend. In one week I'm off to Tasmania with a group of 14 others to spend almost 3 weeks cycling across the Central Plateau and up the east coast. Bush camps and fully-supported touring are a passion for many of our members.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Tue Dec 20, 2011 11:17 pm

rifraf wrote:Did you take your new stove?

Yes :)

How did it perform and what culinary delights did you whip up?


Very well given I didn't follow the instructions :oops: Seriously impressed with it and I suspect used properly will do even better. 15 ml of meths to boil 300 ml and 20 ml to boil 600 ml. I averaged 68 ml of meths per day so happy with that.

Nothing special in the cooking world for me. I am a boil the water type of guy when camping. Cous Cous and Salmon is my culinary limit :)

Solo ride or did you take company?

Solo. No Club here that really tours and whilst I have done tours with others I do like the flexibility/at my pace of solo touring. That said Cavebear was considering coming.

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Wed Dec 21, 2011 12:32 am

rifraf wrote:Ron tell me those Chefsway meals arnt $17.76 each for dogs sake :shock:


$10.77 each at Pinnacle Sports.

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:04 am

Aushiker wrote:
rifraf wrote:Ron tell me those Chefsway meals arnt $17.76 each for dogs sake :shock:


$10.77 each at Pinnacle Sports.

Andrew

Thanks for the pointer Andrew. :D
I'm thinking that the price Ron linked to was for the double portion he mentioned favouring.
They look like nice meals but I have to admit to a sudden gasp of breath at the initial look
at the price.
Ron does say however that they are comparable with a good home cooked meal.
Being in a "serve", single or double, does make for a lot of convenience for when on the road and
not having to muck about with much more than a shaving of Parmesan and maybe some salt/pepper
speaks volumes with regards to what you want to do after climbing off the bike after a hard slog.
I seem to remember some quite nice Watties, heat and eat prepacked, single serving, pasta meals that I found
surprisingly tasty and economically priced.
I was put off them by what pasta tends to do in the way of enlarging my gut but I imagine a few hours riding
a loaded bike would easily deal with some loaded calories/carbohydrates. :idea:
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Dec 21, 2011 9:31 am

rifraf wrote:Ron tell me those Chefsway meals arnt $17.76 each for dogs sake :shock:

Nah, never paid that much for them...$10-12 is the usual. I think that price is for a double serve.

I always start a tour with a couple of these meals in my tucker bag.

Other food favorites are Deb with Onions, Ainsley Herriots instant couscous and risotto, asian laksa cup of soup, Uncle Tobys instant oats gourmet selections, Safcol salmon or tuna pouches, laughing cow cheese wedges, salami, Vita Wheat, powdered milk, and Williamsons earl grey tea. These selections result from the rationisation of my load over many long bushwalks. They are foods that I find palatable, satiate my hunger and satisfy my energy requirements, are easy to pack and carry, and consume minimal fuel for preparation. These are the supplies I'd be taking when I tour to a remote place, otherwise I resupply daily where there are shops enroute.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:10 pm

RonK wrote:
rifraf wrote:Ron tell me those Chefsway meals arnt $17.76 each for dogs sake :shock:

Nah, never paid that much for them...$10-12 is the usual. I think that price is for a double serve.

I always start a tour with a couple of these meals in my tucker bag.

Other food favorites are Deb with Onions, Ainsley Herriots instant couscous and risotto, asian laksa cup of soup, Uncle Tobys instant oats gourmet selections, Safcol salmon or tuna pouches, laughing cow cheese wedges, salami, Vita Wheat, powdered milk, and Williamsons earl grey tea. These selections result from the rationisation of my load over many long bushwalks. They are foods that I find palatable, satiate my hunger and satisfy my energy requirements, are easy to pack and carry, and consume minimal fuel for preparation. These are the supplies I'd be taking when I tour to a remote place, otherwise I resupply daily where there are shops enroute.


Hi Ron,
yeah I thought they might be for a large portion (though I was hoping for a french maid to serve at that price).
What is Deb with onions?
I am familiar with Ainsley couscous and enjoy some of the asian "hot" cup of soups.
The Uncle Toby's oat sachets I've had but not keen on the sugar content - will take some for a tour though.
Those Safcol pouches and tiny tins have the tastiest tuna and although not a big fan I'll eat the salmon to
liven up the menu to try to make it less mundane.
I must trial the Trangia to see how to best deal with rice.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:25 pm

rifraf wrote:What is Deb with onions?




Warning: There are other brands of instant potato on the market, but most require instant milk powder as well. Deb does not.

Deb with onions is Deb Instant Potato with onions in the mix.

BTW Deb even has its own Facebook page :shock:

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Wed Dec 21, 2011 1:37 pm

Thank you Andrew.
I dont recall ever coming across instant "mash" before.
I'll have to put it on my "to do" list :!:
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:10 pm

rifraf wrote:What is Deb with onions?

Deb instant mashed potatos - the staple food of high altitude mountaineers. There is nothing quite like Deb to put a warm lump in your stomach when you've endured a cold and exhausting day, your appetite has gone, and all you want to do is crawl into your sleeping bag and pass out. Along with couscous it makes excellent emergency rations.

rifraf wrote:The Uncle Toby's oat sachets I've had but not keen on the sugar content - will take some for a tour though.

Plenty of sugar is exactly what I want before setting out on a days cycling or walking. Two satchets is my normal breakfast, with tea.

rifraf wrote:I must trial the Trangia to see how to best deal with rice.

Ordinary rice is too much trouble but look around the supermarket and you'll find a plethora of quick to cook rice dishes. These days I prefer couscous and Anslie's risotto. Cheap, light, quick preparation and filling - high in energy too.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Baalzamon » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:11 pm

Those uncle toby oat satchels are what I took on my last tour for a bit of variety. They became my mainstay breakfast and I'm too having 2 satchels. You need all the energy you can get whilst touring as you burn heaps of it.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:17 pm

Baalzamon wrote:Those uncle toby oat satchels are what I took on my last tour for a bit of variety.

Yes- you can even get a variety pack.


Baalzamon wrote:They became my mainstay breakfast and I'm too having 2 satchels.

Well - for breakfast number 1 at least.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Dec 21, 2011 3:58 pm

rifraf wrote:Thank you Andrew.
I dont recall ever coming across instant "mash" before.
I'll have to put it on my "to do" list :!:

A small packet of Deb is a generous meal for one - use half a pack if it's a supplement to another dish. Oil or margarine may be added but is not necessary , and I don't bother out on the road.

Just pour the Deb into the correct amount of boiling water and make sure you keep mixing until it reaches proper mashed potato consistency.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby il padrone » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:00 pm

RonK wrote:
rifraf wrote:I must trial the Trangia to see how to best deal with rice.

Ordinary rice is too much trouble but look around the supermarket and you'll find a plethora of quick to cook rice dishes. These days I prefer couscous and Anslie's risotto. Cheap, light, quick preparation and filling - high in energy too.

If you want quick, easy and tasty, try the 'Taste of India' Bombay Potatoes. Pack serves two (ONE cyclist) and takes just 5 mins to boil in the pack :D Mmmm!
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby il padrone » Wed Dec 21, 2011 4:12 pm

RonK wrote:Other food favorites are Deb with Onions, Ainsley Herriots instant couscous and risotto, asian laksa cup of soup, Uncle Tobys instant oats gourmet selections, Safcol salmon or tuna pouches, laughing cow cheese wedges, salami, Vita Wheat, powdered milk, and Williamsons earl grey tea.

Amazing how two different cycletourists, in widely seperated parts of the country can come up with such similar food choices :shock: I use nearly all of these foods as well, although I go for a nice King Island double brie cheese for appetiser and Bega/Mainland Cheddar for sandwiches, now use Indian roti bread for trips where I'm away from bakeries, and I've got over the Deb :wink:
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Dec 21, 2011 5:57 pm

il padrone wrote:If you want quick, easy and tasty, try the 'Taste of India' Bombay Potatoes. Pack serves two (ONE cyclist) and takes just 5 mins to boil in the pack :D Mmmm!


Hmmm - good tip IP. Looking at the Tasty Bite web page they have quite a selection that would bear some further investigation, and an online store. The downside is that they are not dry food so are heavy to carry in quantity, but a couple of packets wouldn't weigh down the tuckerbag much.

I've also tried some flat bread (mountain bread) but it didn't keep very well - kinda disintegrated after a few days. But there is a much better offering of flat breads available now so another look at them could also be worthwhile.

Hey Rifraf, you ought to try Wazza's dehydrated watermelon - no, I'm not joking.

I don't think I ever get over Deb with Onions - I love it...try half a packet of Deb with a can of Stagg chilli for some early morning firepower, or with one of the chunky canned soups that are taking up so much shelf space in the supermarket these days. Quick and easy when you are on the road and there are shops along the way.
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby il padrone » Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:06 pm

RonK wrote:I've also tried some flat bread (mountain bread) but it didn't keep very well - kinda disintegrated after a few days. But there is a much better offering of flat breads available now so another look at them could also be worthwhile

Yes, I only tried Mountain Bread once...... :( . Was sadly disappointed - wafer thin, hard to spread and falls apart. Roti bread and naan bread, available in many supermarkets in sealed packs, is much better and generally keeps for quite a long time. Roti bread with peanut butter has a real 'satay' quality to it.

Tasty Bite.... that's the brand. Those six-packs look good and you can choose a mixed pack of meals. Six meals for $27 is pretty good value :D
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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:13 pm

il padrone wrote:Bega/Mainland Cheddar for sandwiches


How many days are you carrying the cheese for? I have bee a bit wary about fridge sourced products given I can be carrying it up to two weeks.

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Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby exadios » Wed Dec 21, 2011 6:14 pm

rifraf wrote:Thought I'd get in before anyone else to request the knowledge of what everyones using to
get the billy boiled and dinner on the way.
I've been using my Optimus 111C since Christ played halfback for the Israelites and then some.
My latest move back to Aus has shown I've forgotten to pack my alternate fuel nipples
so I'll have to get onto that so I can once again start using metho in it.
Back in NZ Kero is the cheaper fuel of choice.
I do prefer the metho as it doesnt stink your pack out long term if theres a spill.
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I Do not know what the fire rules are in other states but here in WA none of the camping stoves available can be used when the rating for the day is "Very High" or above.
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