Bike workstands?

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Bike workstands?

Postby Hawkeye » Fri Mar 28, 2008 12:11 pm

I'm thinking about getting a bike workstand to make my mechanicking a bit mroe comfortable on the lower back and knees.

Any suggestions? I notice there's one on weekly special at T7 this week which might be a candidate.

Suggestions?

Thanks, guys.
Hawkeye
 

by BNA » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:01 pm

BNA
 

Postby sogood » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:01 pm

You can go the cheap approach championed by some here (tow bar bike rack, clamp on a post set in a concrete block etc etc) or going with something fancy. Cheaper custom units off eBay to the various models of Park Tools and Ultimate models.

Comes down to, how much do you want to spend?

The other issue to consider is whether you are planning to service a CF or metal frames? With CF frames, you need to be careful with where you clamp and how well the clamping force can be controlled.
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Postby Jean » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:22 pm

Have to be careful clamping metal frames too. My (fairly old) alluminium Cannondale wouldn't take kindly to a too tight clamp in the wrong spot. Some high performance steel tubing can have pretty thin walls too.

For these reasons I've been thinking that I'll get a workstand that supports the bottom bracket and clamps the drop outs rather the tubes. I've seen a few around on the internet and IIRC Tacx was one of the manufacturers.

Cheers
Jean
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Postby MichaelB » Fri Mar 28, 2008 1:41 pm

One o fthe local bike shops has one where the front wheel is removed and clamped in, and the BB rests on a supportive shell arrangement (similar to a rack on a car roof) but with the back wheel hanging in fresh air.

It can be rotated on a post (or you can walk around, but basically, 99% of work can be done and it would be cheap to knock up. No worries about where a frame is clamped and how hard.
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Postby Jean » Fri Mar 28, 2008 2:02 pm

One o fthe local bike shops has one where the front wheel is removed and clamped in, and the BB rests on a supportive shell arrangement (similar to a rack on a car roof) but with the back wheel hanging in fresh air.


I think the idea is that it can clamp either the fork or rear drop out (the clamp generally slides back and forth to accomodate this and different sized bikes) in case you want to work on your front end.

Cheers
Jean
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Postby sogood » Fri Mar 28, 2008 3:13 pm

Jean wrote:I think the idea is that it can clamp either the fork or rear drop out (the clamp generally slides back and forth to accomodate this and different sized bikes) in case you want to work on your front end.

Yes, this is definitely the preferred setup for a lot of pro mechanics these days due to the number of CF frames. With CF, you can always swap in an alloy seat post for clamping but can get rather tedious. I've been gently clamping my CF Ridley on the top tube on my Ultimate stand. So far been good as the clamp pressure can be very finely adjusted.
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Postby Hawkeye » Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:29 pm

Atm, all bikes are alloy, although one - the Jekyll - I suspect has pretty thin-walled tubing on account of the fact it's a Large size duallie that weighs just over 12kg including all the crap I have hanging off it.

And who knows, I may end up with a CF frame roadie some time in the next 12 months. :roll:

I'd be looking to clamp on the seatpost on all the bikes I have. Clamping on BB shell and chainstays or dropouts wouldn't work for the Jekyll. Chainstays are different heights and it has a Lefty fork.

How much do I want to spend? As little as possible consistent with a safe, workable solution that won't hurt the bike. For home use. Needs to be packed away when not in use.
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Postby sogood » Fri Mar 28, 2008 4:50 pm

I have a model of Ultimate that is one model before this but essentially the same.

http://www.ussbike.com/s.nl;jsessionid= ... =A&id=3638

Folds down in a compact size and sturdy when expanded. The clamp is rotatable and clamping force can be finely dialed in as you go (not preset like how quick-release works). I bought it off eBay and have found it to be worth its money. I understand that one key selection issue is the clamp. Some of the cheaper clamps have plastic components and may not be too durable nor flexible in its range of movements. Some people just buy a quality clamp (eg. Park Tools) and make their own stand. Not a bad way to go if you are handy.
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Postby JohnA » Fri Mar 28, 2008 10:12 pm

i purchased that one from torpedo7 and took delivery of it today
fold down neatly, seems very sturdy and good adjustment on the clamp which also allows full 360 turn

i even put the heavy hardtail bike on it with no problems
so far so good

i as going to post some pics of it but unfortunately i am not allowed to just yet
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Postby Mulger bill » Fri Mar 28, 2008 11:34 pm

My ebay jobbie which looks like a clone of the T7 one has served me well for over two years now.

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Postby LuckyPierre » Sat Mar 29, 2008 4:31 pm

I've got the T7 one (from when it was 'previously known as YC100').
It's fine for road bikes, but a bit light for my mtb. The plastic clamp is very adjustable and easily controlled.
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Postby Hawkeye » Sat Mar 29, 2008 7:55 pm

Thanks for the input guys. I ended up going with this one from T7, known as a BT999:
Image

Price was right at $140 on the weekly special, had some good feedback comment, and is the same as the YC100.
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Postby dorlo » Sun Mar 30, 2008 5:13 pm

I bought a $14 bike hook (two horizontal prongs with rubber coated hooks that hold the bike by supporting the top tube) and screwed it onto a brick wall of my house at chest level.
Works a treat for cleaning and as a 'work stand'... I guess the only downside is you can only work on one side of the bike at a time. But it was cheap!
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Postby Hawkeye » Mon Mar 31, 2008 9:02 pm

The issue for me is that I have hydraulic brakes on both my steeds and sometimes you need to set the bike at odd angles so the hoses are vertical to assist in the brake bleeding process.

Nice idea, though, for those of us without that complication. :D
Hawkeye
 

Postby Hawkeye » Thu Apr 03, 2008 9:47 pm

The package from T7 turned up today.

Test-fitted the Jekyll to the stand, and I don't think I'd be so keen on using just the seatpost to grip the bike. The base is not quite wide enough to provide a stable base with tha much of the front of the bike hanging off one end.

The good news is that the clamp is pretty finely adjustable so any reservations about the risk of crushing a tube are completely unfounded.

Overall, it seems an excellent unit for home workshop use. I can see why it got the good reviews.
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Postby Whitz End » Sat Apr 05, 2008 10:25 am

Grip Sport Stand

/thread.
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Postby vic » Tue Apr 08, 2008 7:33 pm

Here's a cheap but effective solution for longer term work. Drill seat post diameter hole in chunky piece of timber. Insert spare seat post. Clamp firmly in solidly attached vice. Remove saddle and post from bike. Lift and turn upside down, lowering vacant seat post tube over clamped block and post. Secure, and swivels, and upside down, and free. Yes, I know the war is over....
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Postby Hawkeye » Tue Apr 08, 2008 9:31 pm

vic wrote:Yes, I know the war is over....
:lol: :lol:

Better late than never... Welcome aboard Vic.

I know Yass quite well. Nice part of the world down there.
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Postby stryker84 » Tue Apr 08, 2008 11:15 pm

vic wrote:Here's a cheap but effective solution for longer term work. Drill seat post diameter hole in chunky piece of timber. Insert spare seat post. Clamp firmly in solidly attached vice. Remove saddle and post from bike. Lift and turn upside down, lowering vacant seat post tube over clamped block and post. Secure, and swivels, and upside down, and free. Yes, I know the war is over....

Could even use it right way up, for gears and stuff, if you just bolt/clamp the seat post to the frame and let the bike hang. Better make sure it clamps well though, and I wouldn't exert high downward pressure on the frame, but for light service it'd be fine...
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Postby vic » Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:55 am

Thanks JR, Yass and Bowning is the kind of place that grows on you. Nice little community as well. Cycling is a bit limited as I am too scared to haunt the highway, Nice backroads for the MTB though.

Stryker, what a fabulous idea! Thanks for that one. :)
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Postby Blaze » Sun May 11, 2008 12:20 am

j.r.hawkins wrote:Thanks for the input guys. I ended up going with this one from T7, known as a BT999:


Price was right at $140 on the weekly special, had some good feedback comment, and is the same as the YC100.


I brought one like this on Ebay.. $99 plus del... ooocycles was he seller..

Doh.. can't even reply with links yet..
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