Stitch

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Stitch

Postby Addictr3 » Mon Mar 12, 2012 12:29 pm

Hi Everyone,

I have had a cold for 1 week now, also with a slight chest infection but havent required any medication. I have noticed since Friday that when I cycle I get a stitch within 30minutes of exercise. I have never had this problem before; any ideas as to why? Its on my right side and it seems like the cold could be a possibly factor?

I wonder if because my nose is stuffy and with the slight chest congestion that perhaps I am not breathing well enough which causes a stitch?

Any ideas or if anyone has had the same issues? Cheers Addict.
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by BNA » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:03 pm

BNA
 

Re: Stitch

Postby Petee » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:03 pm

A normal stitch it caused by the area of the stitch not having enough space and getting somewhat squashed during exercise. If you have a stitch on the right side you put your right arm up and stretch that area and breathe slowly, it will easily deal with it.

So many you have some inflammation that could cause that.

If it doesnt get better check with your doc you might need some meds to speed up the process.

gl.
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Re: Stitch

Postby sogood » Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:37 pm

Petee wrote:A normal stitch it caused by the area of the stitch not having enough space and getting somewhat squashed during exercise...

Where did you get that idea from? Speculating? And what's a "normal" stitch? Care to also elaborate on as to what an "abnormal" stitch is?
So many you have some inflammation that could cause that.

This is getting more weird.
If it doesnt get better check with your doc you might need some meds to speed up the process.

I wouldn't want to go to a doctor who hands out tablets to "treat" a stitch.
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Re: Stitch

Postby Addictr3 » Mon Mar 12, 2012 5:54 pm

LOL (AT) sogood.

But think I have worked out the issue. I happen to be breathing more shallow than normal hence the cold would be due to that. I'll see how I go in the next week or so. Cheers,
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Re: Stitch

Postby eeksll » Tue Mar 13, 2012 12:35 pm

you might be onto something with the shallow breathing, cause I know when i get a stitch taking big belly breaths helps.
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Re: Stitch

Postby rkelsen » Tue Mar 13, 2012 12:43 pm

I thought stitches were an indicator of dehydration. Perhaps you haven't been drinking as much water due to having a cold?
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Re: Stitch

Postby Petee » Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:06 pm

sogood wrote:
Petee wrote:A normal stitch it caused by the area of the stitch not having enough space and getting somewhat squashed during exercise...

Where did you get that idea from? Speculating? And what's a "normal" stitch? Care to also elaborate on as to what an "abnormal" stitch is?
So many you have some inflammation that could cause that.

This is getting more weird.
If it doesnt get better check with your doc you might need some meds to speed up the process.

I wouldn't want to go to a doctor who hands out tablets to "treat" a stitch.

I got my information from a documentary about exercise.

There was a section about stitches and it is normally caused by a certain part of your torso not having much space, I get it all the time if I exercise with a heavy back pack on, I rarely get it without one so there must be some merit to the theory.

So it stands to reason that if there is some sort of inflammation it could cause a stitch?

I also didn't mean to go to the doctor for the stitch, I meant in case of some inflammation or something of the sort.
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Re: Stitch

Postby sogood » Sat Mar 24, 2012 6:21 pm

Petee wrote:I got my information from a documentary about exercise.

There was a section about stitches and it is normally caused by a certain part of your torso not having much space, I get it all the time if I exercise with a heavy back pack on, I rarely get it without one so there must be some merit to the theory.

So it stands to reason that if there is some sort of inflammation it could cause a stitch?

Sorry, that's no foundation for your hypothesis. It's dangerous for people to conjure up images of the body based on a tiny bit of knowledge. Further, inflammation don't come and go within a matter of minutes.

Don't know what documentary you watched but there are documentary and documentary. And then there's subjective interpretation of what's expressed in the documentary.
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Re: Stitch

Postby Meditator » Sun Mar 25, 2012 12:49 am

Another runner told me that you get stitches when you don't get enough oxygen. On his recommendation i lifted my head height when running and never got stitches again. When you run with your head down, your throat will close up a bit and you don't get so much air in.

the problem of the OP is probably caused by the factors he indicated though this still translates into a lack of oxygen, doesn't it?

If you are carrying a heavy backpack, perhaps you are not able to fill your lungs adequately because of the weight of the backpack and the likely fact that you are not wearing it properly. the weight should be on your hips not on your shoulders. If the weight is on your hips then you shoulders will be able to rise and your chest expand easily and you should be able to fill your lungs. For sure you need more oxygen when carrying a full backpack than when not. And walk with your head up, not down because it might also have been only that.
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Re: Stitch

Postby Addictr3 » Sun Mar 25, 2012 8:33 am

I saw a doctor Thursday, It wasn’t the lack of oxygen which was causing the stitch, actually the post about inflammation was spot on... When I was sick I was on anti-biotic which left me dehydrated and actually badly constipated (sorry for details) which was causing inflammation, causing the stitch

LOL crazy eh?
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Re: Stitch

Postby Petee » Fri Apr 06, 2012 8:38 am

cool I was right, sorry to disappoint you sogood :).
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Re: Stitch

Postby kunama » Sun Apr 08, 2012 12:58 pm

Source - Australian Institute of Sport documents:

What is a stitch?

In the scientific literature stitches are referred to Exercise-related Transient Abdominal Pain and are described as localised pain usually felt on the side, just below the ribs, which sometimes accompanied by a stabbing sensation in the shoulder joint. The pain can range from sharp or stabbing to mild cramping, aching or pulling. Sometimes people can exercise through the pain, though usually the sufferer is forced to slow down or cease exercise. Stitches usually disappear within a few minutes after ceasing exercise however some people experience some residual soreness for a few days, especially after severe pain. While the stitch seems to be more prevalent in activities that involve vigorous upright, repetitive movement of the torso e.g. running and horse riding, it can occur in any type of sporting activity.

What causes stitches?

Scientists are unsure of the exact cause of stitches. For some time, they were thought to be caused by a reduction in blood supply to the diaphragm, a large muscle involved in breathing. It was suggested that during exercise, blood was shunted away from the diaphragm and redirected to exercising muscles. This theory has now lost favour with scientists as both the diaphragm and the limb muscles need to work harder during exercise, so it is unlikely that an inadequate blood flow is directed to the diaphragm. Another popular theory is that stitch is caused by organs pulling on the ligaments that connect the gut to the diaphragm. Jolting during exercise may cause these organs to pull on the ligaments and create stress on the diaphragm, though this theory does not explain the incidence of stitches in athletes involved in sports not involving a significant jolting action e.g. swimming.
A more recent idea is that stitch is caused by irritation of the parietal peritoneum. Two layers of membrane (peritoneum) line the inside wall of the abdominal cavity. One layer covers the abdominal organs, while the other layer (parietal peritoneum) attaches to the abdominal wall. The two layers are separated by lubricating fluid, which allows the two surfaces to move against each other without pain. It is thought that the stitch occurs when there is friction between the abdominal contents and the parietal peritoneum. This friction may be caused by a distended (full) stomach or a reduction in the lubricating fluid. The parietal peritoneum is also attached to the phrenic nerve, which refers pain to the shoulder tip region, which may explain the shoulder pain that has been described by some athletes.

How can I avoid stitch?

Eating too closely to exercise or consuming inappropriate foods seems to increase the chances of athletes experiencing a stitch during exercise. High-fat and fibre foods are more likely to cause problems. The likelihood of stitch occurring may be reduced by allowing 2-4 hours before exercising after a large meal and choosing high-carbohydrate, low-fat and moderate to low protein options in the pre-exercise meal.
Immediately before and during exercise, athletes should avoid consuming highly concentrated fluids such as soft drink, cordial and fruit juice, as they seem to increase the risk of stitches occurring during exercise. These type of drinks empty more slowly from the stomach than both water and sports drink, thereby leaving the stomach more distended for longer. It is also preferable for athletes to consume small amounts of fluid regularly during exercise, as this is better tolerated than large volumes of fluids being consumed at one time.

How should stitch be treated?

Sometimes the stitch eases if you slow down and drop your intensity for a period. However, the most common way to alleviate stitch is to bend forward while pushing on the affected area and breathing deeply. Sometimes this can be done while exercising but usually the pain eases more quickly when exercise is ceased. Another option is to lie down while elevating your hips.
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Re: Stitch

Postby Addictr3 » Sun Apr 08, 2012 3:14 pm

wow we have a wizard
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