Vivente Randonneur

Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Mon Apr 02, 2012 3:06 pm

il padrone wrote:
elStado wrote:But for someone like me who is planning to do a lot of international travelling with this sort of bike....

....would ride a Bike Friday :P :idea:


Saw that video ages ago, even considered it.. but something just doesn't seem right about touring on a folding bike with such tiny wheels. I'm sure it's all well and good as others have done it, but the thought of it just doesn't attract me very much. Maybe after doing an OS trip with a heavier, regular sized touring bike I might start to look for smaller and lighter alternatives.

Just picked up my VWR today. Have to make some modifications and swap the rack and saddle over, but should have it ready for the commute to work within the next few days depending when I have free time.

Image

I have an Italian Road Bike mirror I was going to use on it but I am now having second thoughts due to how it needs to be installed and how I'd either need to swap it to the left bar or get another one for both bars for when I take it OS. Also not sure if it will be an issue when packing the whole bike in the box as it will extend the length of the bars an extra few cm too. I'll have a look in the rear view mirror thread as I saw another mirror that attaches onto the down tube that looked alright and would be easier with packing and placement.
Last edited by elStado on Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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by BNA » Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:51 pm

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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby Tim » Mon Apr 02, 2012 4:51 pm

Just wondering elStado whether you will be making any crankset modifications, and if so, what ? As mentioned before I will probably only change the granny gear on mine to a 24t and maybe fit a larger cassette.
I see you are changing saddles. Mine came fitted with a women's (I think) gel saddle which, admittedly after only about 5 hours on top of it, felt pretty comfy. What will you be fitting?
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby Tim » Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:06 pm

Tim wrote: What will you be fitting


One guess, does it start with B?
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Mon Apr 02, 2012 5:16 pm

Tim wrote:Just wondering elStado whether you will be making any crankset modifications, and if so, what ? As mentioned before I will probably only change the granny gear on mine to a 24t and maybe fit a larger cassette.


Undecided on that. Guy at the LBS reckons the gearing will be fine for me for all but the most steepest hills. So I might have to try and see how I go. Not much around Perth to test ride on though.

Might swap the chainset out to something lower. Or even just swap the small chainring for something smaller if it will fit. I was planning to ask around here myself as I am a bit of a noob on this topic.

I see you are changing saddles. Mine came fitted with a women's (I think) gel saddle which, admittedly after only about 5 hours on top of it, felt pretty comfy. What will you be fitting?


That's a good question. The ladies saddle looks pretty silly TBH.. but if it is genuinely and consistently comfortable then that's good enough for me. The anti-Brooks spiel on the Vivente site is pretty convincing, I'll have to do a comparison test. I was planning to put my Brooks B17 Imperial on it as it has been broken in and is pretty comfortable and provides good support. I sit pretty light on the saddle anyway, so it's not such an issue as some heavier set folk out there.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby il padrone » Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:25 pm

elStado wrote:The anti-Brooks spiel on the Vivente site is pretty convincing.

Hmm....

Vivente wrote:Noel had always got a sore bum with Brooks leather saddles, regardless of the model, or it being new or being “worn in”. He carried the recommended dubbin and used it, but still got a bit sore.

It doesn't convince me!

Riding a Brooks for years and always getting sore?? If that happened to me I'd be ditching the Brooks. But it was what happened to me with the old Selle Italia saddle I used for 10 years. Just recently I rode 1000kms around Tassie on a near-new Brooks Swift. It had 300-400kms on it from commuting. I never had any saddle soreness on the Tassie tour.

BTW, dubbin is something used on horse saddles and harness gear where the leather needs to be significantly softened. Brooks specifically advise against its use, instead they make Proofide, to waterproof and slightly ease the leather. I have used dubbin once... about 30 years ago. Never in more recent times.
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Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 02, 2012 7:28 pm

It's a fact - despite the Brooks' many fans, they simply don't suit everyone. But you won't know until you have given one a good try, and they are well worth trying.


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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby Tim » Mon Apr 02, 2012 8:50 pm

At the moment, having ridden my new bike around a bit, what I like most is that I have lost my "expensive road racing bike neurosis".
This bike isn't cheap, but it is compared to one or two of my other bikes. I have no guilt about buying this one. I love it ( I don't really feel guilty about the other bikes).
I don't feel compelled to ride faster or maintain an average speed. I pedal it just for fun, it is not a training tool. The only purpose is pure enjoyment.
It rattles a bit, just the mudguard stays I think, but the rattles don't drive me nuts the way a creaking BB does on a bike twice the price that should perform better.
It is heavy and clunky but I like that because I know the frame and components are well built and made for reliability and durability rather than the questionable performance,reliability and durability of my other bikes. If I ride slightly slower the weight is not an issue.
Whilst riding it I am not obsessively listening for creaks, cracks and clicks that I've become accustomed to on the others. It's like riding used to be as a kid, the bike doesn't matter or enter my thoughts that much. I admire the surroundings, smell the breeze, wave to people and take it all far less seriously. It is the motion of the bike and body, not the bike itself that grabs me.
I haven't had it long nor traveled far yet but I think I am going to enjoy this touring caper. :D
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 02, 2012 10:25 pm

Tim wrote:At the moment, having ridden my new bike around a bit, what I like most is that I have lost my "expensive road racing bike neurosis".
This bike isn't cheap, but it is compared to one or two of my other bikes. I have no guilt about buying this one. I love it ( I don't really feel guilty about the other bikes).
I don't feel compelled to ride faster or maintain an average speed. I pedal it just for fun, it is not a training tool. The only purpose is pure enjoyment.
It rattles a bit, just the mudguard stays I think, but the rattles don't drive me nuts the way a creaking BB does on a bike twice the price that should perform better.
It is heavy and clunky but I like that because I know the frame and components are well built and made for reliability and durability rather than the questionable performance,reliability and durability of my other bikes. If I ride slightly slower the weight is not an issue.
Whilst riding it I am not obsessively listening for creaks, cracks and clicks that I've become accustomed to on the others. It's like riding used to be as a kid, the bike doesn't matter or enter my thoughts that much. I admire the surroundings, smell the breeze, wave to people and take it all far less seriously. It is the motion of the bike and body, not the bike itself that grabs me.
I haven't had it long nor traveled far yet but I think I am going to enjoy this touring caper. :D

You are on the way - and once you become a fully-fledged tourist you won't even bother to mention the list of bikes you have in your signature... :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 02, 2012 10:30 pm

elStado wrote:I have an Italian Road Bike mirror I was going to use on it but I am now having second thoughts due to how it needs to be installed and how I'd either need to swap it to the left bar or get another one for both bars for when I take it OS.

I bought one ages ago, decided I didn't like it, and never used it. This is the one for you...
Image
BTW - just love the standard horn... :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Mon Apr 02, 2012 10:47 pm

RonK wrote:I bought one ages ago, decided I didn't like it, and never used it. This is the one for you...
Image
BTW - just love the standard horn... :lol: :lol: :lol:


The IRBM is a great invention but not quite suited for what I am using the bike. I'll check out this Mirrycle mirror. Not sure if it will fit as there's a notice saying it isn't compatible with 2010+ STI levers..

And yeah, the bugle horn is classic. The mount is built into the headset spacers so it'll be a mission to completely remove. I personally prefer a small bell that gives off a nice loud "ting" sound than the horn.. most peds or cyclists would have no idea what the sound is.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Mon Apr 02, 2012 10:57 pm

elStado wrote: The mount is built into the headset spacers so it'll be a mission to completely remove.

Nah, it's a piece of cake.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Thu Apr 05, 2012 9:44 pm

So from reading the section about cranksets on the VWR website it seems that the crankset should be able to go down to a 24T from the 26T that comes with the original set without having to change the whole crankset. Pity they don't just put a 24T on it to start with.

Can anyone recommend where I can buy a 24T chainring that will be compatible with the crankset that comes with the new 2012 model of the VWR? They are Sugino triple cranks, 110/74 BCD. If the chainring isn't too expensive and I can do a straight swap out I might go down this path as the idea of having a really easy lowest gear appeals to me if I will be riding up some steep hills fully loaded with gear.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby il padrone » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:06 pm

Any 74bcd chainring will do, but buy a stainless steel one. Little alloy granny rings wear out really fast!

I'd say the same about your current 26t inner ring.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:16 pm

elStado wrote:Can anyone recommend where I can buy a 24T chainring that will be compatible with the crankset that comes with the new 2012 model of the VWR? They are Sugino triple cranks, 110/74 BCD. If the chainring isn't too expensive and I can do a straight swap out I might go down this path as the idea of having a really easy lowest gear appeals to me if I will be riding up some steep hills fully loaded with gear.

Why don't you just Google Sugino 74 24T chainring? They are common and cheap - you should be to get one for under $20.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:46 pm

RonK wrote:
elStado wrote:Can anyone recommend where I can buy a 24T chainring that will be compatible with the crankset that comes with the new 2012 model of the VWR? They are Sugino triple cranks, 110/74 BCD. If the chainring isn't too expensive and I can do a straight swap out I might go down this path as the idea of having a really easy lowest gear appeals to me if I will be riding up some steep hills fully loaded with gear.

Why don't you just Google Sugino 74 24T chainring? They are common and cheap - you should be to get one for under $20.


I did, and I didn't get much.

Also had a look on ebay, there's a few options but all made of alloy and priced around $35 inc delivery.

E.g. http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Sugino-24t-7 ... 229wt_1165

Most of the big online stores didn't have much either.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:56 pm

elStado wrote:I did, and I didn't get much.

Funny I get hundreds of hits.

Steel is nice to have but not essential. If you insist, get one of these.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Thu Apr 05, 2012 11:04 pm

RonK wrote:
elStado wrote:I did, and I didn't get much.

Funny I get hundreds of hits.

Steel is nice to have but not essential. If you insist, get one of these.


I got 59,900 hits.. https://www.google.com.au/search?source ... +chainring

I'm after quality, not quantity though.. thanks for the link.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby GregLR » Fri Apr 06, 2012 3:05 am

Presumably it's a 5-arm chainring, in which case SJS has this TA 74mm bcd alloy ring with 24 teeth:
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/ta-74mm-pcd- ... r-prod208/
My partner has one of those on her Sugino / Spa XD-2 crankset.

Here's a cheap steel 24t Stronglight ring:
http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/stronglight- ... -prod3536/

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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby Tim » Sat Apr 07, 2012 9:36 pm

I spent 2 or 3 hours today riding around on the bush roads out the back of Lakes Entrance in the Colquohuon Forest. I enjoyed myself but have to admit I struggled a bit in the sandier and loose, deeper gravel sections. Do any of you more experienced guys have any tips for handling these types of roads? I am running 35mm tyres on the VWR which were inflated too high at about 75psi, so firstly lower pressure is better although I also had some sections with quite large 40-50mm rocks, so what would be a good balance?
The sand wasn't very deep, only an inch or two, but still enough to get the wobbles up and catch the front wheel. I know to try and relax and not "freeze up", this definitely helps. Slowing down also helps, but sometimes just powering through at a higher speed and holding a straight line was better unless the sand was too deep.
I stayed upright throughout the ride but came close to losing it once or twice. I wasn't carrying a load today but wonder if it is any different carrying extra weight? Wider tyres would help, what is considered a good all round width for bitumen and dirt?
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby Tim » Sat Apr 14, 2012 6:37 pm

Hmm... bit long winded all that above.
Put simply, what width tyre are people using for a combination of dirt and bitumen, and how do you stay upright in the soft/loose stuff.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Sat Apr 14, 2012 11:03 pm

Tim wrote:Hmm... bit long winded all that above.
Put simply, what width tyre are people using for a combination of dirt and bitumen, and how do you stay upright in the soft/loose stuff.


I've gone through a few bits of loose sand/gravel with the stock 700x35 tires (AT) 80PSI and they have been fine. A little twitchy but not a real issue.

Maybe consider some 700x38 at a lower pressure (~60PSI) if it's bothering you?
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby il padrone » Sat Apr 14, 2012 11:55 pm

Tim wrote:Hmm... bit long winded all that above.
Put simply, what width tyre are people using for a combination of dirt and bitumen, and how do you stay upright in the soft/loose stuff.

Always-keep-pedalling!

Power on - you keep better directional stability and control.

Rolling - you'll lose it.

Low trye pressure is good. With 35mm tyres I would not go too much below 60psi though, for soft sand. I roll on 26x1.75 (47mm) - much better :D . 700C tyres are now available in widths up to 40mm, but don't know if the WR frame will take them. Try to keep your weight more rearwards to allow the front tyre to float more. No matter where your steering goes, KEEP PEDALLING!

Spin, spin, spin, spin, spin.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:17 am

elStado wrote:I'll check out this Mirrycle mirror. Not sure if it will fit as there's a notice saying it isn't compatible with 2010+ STI levers.

Hmmm, didn't see that notice. But since the VWR uses 9-speed Tiagra STI there's a good chance the Mirrycle can be used. If your levers don't have the open space in the clip the mirror will fit.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby RonK » Sun Apr 15, 2012 8:21 am

il padrone wrote:Power on - you keep better directional stability and control.

Rolling - you'll lose it.

Try to keep your weight more rearwards to allow the front tyre to float more. No matter where your steering goes, KEEP PEDALLING!

Spin, spin, spin, spin, spin.

Yes, this is standard dirt bike technique for sand riding - let the front wheel follow the ruts and keep the power on.
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Re: Vivente Randonneur

Postby elStado » Sun Apr 15, 2012 10:27 pm

RonK wrote:
elStado wrote:I'll check out this Mirrycle mirror. Not sure if it will fit as there's a notice saying it isn't compatible with 2010+ STI levers.

Hmmm, didn't see that notice. But since the VWR uses 9-speed Tiagra STI there's a good chance the Mirrycle can be used. If your levers don't have the open space in the clip the mirror will fit.


I spoke to Noel and he reckons they'll fit fine. They are actually in the process of trailing a bunch of mirrors for the VWR, including the Mirrycle. Still to decide but at least there's a couple of good options.
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