Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Questions about purchasing bicycles and parts

Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby GreyhoundCycle » Wed Mar 21, 2012 11:50 am

Good stuffs last a bit longer in psychological terms.... just My personal experience.

Buy the best bike you can afford will save a lot money on upgrades later. Some may say "oh, I will upgrade when parts worn out." But in reality, if some spare money is in the pocket, it will be out there taking new parts home in 6 months.

If start the first bike on no brand frame, it is likely soon the person will be out testing new bikes from reputable brands, and eventually getting a new bike sooner than planned.

Same rules apply to my bike equipements too, e.g. pump, helmet, bottle cages and clothing.

After all, bike riding is still relatively cheaper than many outdoor sport hobbies! 8)

Enjoy shopping and ride ride ride :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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by BNA » Sun Mar 25, 2012 12:24 am

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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby SAM77H » Sun Mar 25, 2012 12:24 am

Hi all. As a cyclist returning to the 'game' after a ten year break Im loving the info in this thread !
At the moment I am tossing up between a Trek 3.1 for $1750 or an Apollo Giro for $1100.
Couple of bikes in between are Defy 1, and Cannondale Synapse. All have 105 running gear.
If anyone wants to give me feedback / has one please speak now !
(I am in Newcastle NSW so Cannondale will warrant a trip to Sydney.)
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Rex Chan » Mon Apr 02, 2012 9:12 pm

Hello all! I just registered and might as well get the first post out of the way. Just started riding my hardtail mtb again (for fitness), and looking at getting a road bike to go faster/further. In response to SAM: I think I'm in the same price range as you, and been looking at Reid Falco ($950/105/carbon fork/Aksium), Azzurri Imperia Elite ($1000/105/carbon fork/Cycling Express), Azzurri Forza Elite ($1350/105/carbon frame) and Hasa ($1450/SRAM Apex/Aksium/carbon frame).

I'm avoiding big brands (too common, and not as good value), and like SRAM (to be different). I'm also buying on looks as much as anything else, as I don't think I'll notice at my skill/fitness level. I actually really wanted a Malvern Star for the brand (I'm from Melbourne) and looks (Oppy A4 A5 are in our price range), but they only do Shimano Tiagra/105 (no SRAM).
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby dalex » Thu Apr 26, 2012 9:12 am

Nice post all. As I am new to cycling I will come back to it from time to time as I continuet the learning process. I am after a road bike, and have jumped on a 25 year Repco superlite whilst I decide what I really need, and set a budget.

A couple of questions that would be useful for me and I am sure others.

1)Store versus mainstream brands. Are the what appear to be well priced ($1 to $1.5k) store brand bikes (MBC, Reid et. al.) worth including in my evaluation, may I better to stick with more mainstream brands? Perhaps if someone can lay down the pros and cons here.
2) Heavy Riders. As a heavier rider (115kg), I have done some reading and see differing opinions on what is best. I am leaning toward aluminium, with a higher spoke count wheel. Confused on carbon seat posts still.

Thanks

Dalex
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby galactictuan » Thu Apr 26, 2012 10:58 pm

dalex wrote:Nice post all. As I am new to cycling I will come back to it from time to time as I continuet the learning process. I am after a road bike, and have jumped on a 25 year Repco superlite whilst I decide what I really need, and set a budget.

A couple of questions that would be useful for me and I am sure others.

1)Store versus mainstream brands. Are the what appear to be well priced ($1 to $1.5k) store brand bikes (MBC, Reid et. al.) worth including in my evaluation, may I better to stick with more mainstream brands? Perhaps if someone can lay down the pros and cons here.
2) Heavy Riders. As a heavier rider (115kg), I have done some reading and see differing opinions on what is best. I am leaning toward aluminium, with a higher spoke count wheel. Confused on carbon seat posts still.

Thanks

Dalex


If you're 115kg, you might need the Shimano RDX-700 wheelset which is made of diamonds.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby dalex » Sat May 05, 2012 7:18 pm

galactictuan wrote:
dalex wrote:Nice post all. As I am new to cycling I will come back to it from time to time as I continuet the learning process. I am after a road bike, and have jumped on a 25 year Repco superlite whilst I decide what I really need, and set a budget.

A couple of questions that would be useful for me and I am sure others.

1)Store versus mainstream brands. Are the what appear to be well priced ($1 to $1.5k) store brand bikes (MBC, Reid et. al.) worth including in my evaluation, may I better to stick with more mainstream brands? Perhaps if someone can lay down the pros and cons here.
2) Heavy Riders. As a heavier rider (115kg), I have done some reading and see differing opinions on what is best. I am leaning toward aluminium, with a higher spoke count wheel. Confused on carbon seat posts still.

Thanks

Dalex


If you're 115kg, you might need the Shimano RDX-700 wheelset which is made of diamonds.


After reading a lot, on this forum and others, I ended up going for an entry level roadie in the Trek 1.1. It is a solid all aluminium unit with what appear to be solid rims, so I should not need to worry about breaking anything. I was very tempted on the store brand bikes with good components, but at $599 the Trek with the entry level components should do me fine. I did a ride today that took me 54 minutes, and last week on the MTB it was 68 minutes so I am quite happy with that.

cheers

Dalex
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby mizicadg » Mon May 07, 2012 3:33 pm

Am considering buying giant tcr2 road bicycle with parts and frame from a current auction on eBay... Prob is frame has a crack but price sounds really cheap... Where do I go to get frame repaired? :?:
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby smokez87 » Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:54 pm

I am currently an international student in Melbourne. I have stopped cycling regularly for about 6 years now and currently require to buy a MTB. Recently I just got employed at a McDonalds, and by bus it is about 20 minutes away, the train station from the campus I live in is about 15 minutes away. So I decided to shop around for a MTB that I could use for commuting as well as riding off road during my free time.

After looking around, I decided to build up my own bike. I realized that this would be the best way for me to build an ideal bike even though it will be my first project. I have done some extensive research on how to build mountain bikes from the frame up and was wondering if this was advisable?

Currently I am looking at two frames which I found on Cycling Deal (Victoria), it's the BEONE HORNET PLUS mountain bike frame which is priced at $280 or a cheaper alternative will be the Venzo Mountain Bike Alloy frame which is priced at $139. .

Another issue I am facing is choosing a fork. How would I know how much suspension would I need? The roads I usually travel in are either gravel roads or normal paved roads. What would be the ideal budget for a medium range suspension?

Building up a custom bike would be ideal for me as I could buy parts slowly on a weekly basis. The main purpose I need the bike is to travel to work.

I hope I could get some advice over.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby BNE_2011 » Fri Jun 15, 2012 11:27 am

smokez87 wrote:I am currently an international student in Melbourne. I have stopped cycling regularly for about 6 years now and currently require to buy a MTB. Recently I just got employed at a McDonalds, and by bus it is about 20 minutes away, the train station from the campus I live in is about 15 minutes away. So I decided to shop around for a MTB that I could use for commuting as well as riding off road during my free time.

After looking around, I decided to build up my own bike. I realized that this would be the best way for me to build an ideal bike even though it will be my first project. I have done some extensive research on how to build mountain bikes from the frame up and was wondering if this was advisable?

Currently I am looking at two frames which I found on Cycling Deal (Victoria), it's the BEONE HORNET PLUS mountain bike frame which is priced at $280 or a cheaper alternative will be the Venzo Mountain Bike Alloy frame which is priced at $139. .

Another issue I am facing is choosing a fork. How would I know how much suspension would I need? The roads I usually travel in are either gravel roads or normal paved roads. What would be the ideal budget for a medium range suspension?

Building up a custom bike would be ideal for me as I could buy parts slowly on a weekly basis. The main purpose I need the bike is to travel to work.

I hope I could get some advice over.


The suspension depends on your frame. Watch out. If you frame is made for 80-100mm you can't put in 140mm fork because it affects the riding
and your warranty. Same in the other direction !. So find out first what you want, then choose the frame, and then we'll can give you some kind of advice.

Had a quick look and found out that the Hornet (nice frame) has a travel of 100mm to 130mm. How much are you willing to spend for the fork ?

Regards, BNE
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby smokez87 » Fri Jun 15, 2012 7:44 pm

BNE_2011 wrote:
smokez87 wrote:I am currently an international student in Melbourne. I have stopped cycling regularly for about 6 years now and currently require to buy a MTB. Recently I just got employed at a McDonalds, and by bus it is about 20 minutes away, the train station from the campus I live in is about 15 minutes away. So I decided to shop around for a MTB that I could use for commuting as well as riding off road during my free time.

After looking around, I decided to build up my own bike. I realized that this would be the best way for me to build an ideal bike even though it will be my first project. I have done some extensive research on how to build mountain bikes from the frame up and was wondering if this was advisable?

Currently I am looking at two frames which I found on Cycling Deal (Victoria), it's the BEONE HORNET PLUS mountain bike frame which is priced at $280 or a cheaper alternative will be the Venzo Mountain Bike Alloy frame which is priced at $139. .

Another issue I am facing is choosing a fork. How would I know how much suspension would I need? The roads I usually travel in are either gravel roads or normal paved roads. What would be the ideal budget for a medium range suspension?

Building up a custom bike would be ideal for me as I could buy parts slowly on a weekly basis. The main purpose I need the bike is to travel to work.

I hope I could get some advice over.


The suspension depends on your frame. Watch out. If you frame is made for 80-100mm you can't put in 140mm fork because it affects the riding
and your warranty. Same in the other direction !. So find out first what you want, then choose the frame, and then we'll can give you some kind of advice.

Had a quick look and found out that the Hornet (nice frame) has a travel of 100mm to 130mm. How much are you willing to spend for the fork ?

Regards, BNE






Hi!

I just made a purchase on the forum yesterday, used On-One Inbred Frame (16'') with extras (seat post, clam,saddle, headset and bar) for $200 shipped. WTS hunter valley on one inbred with extras

From what information I have from the on-one website I could not find what the travel of this frame is.

My budget for a fork would be somewhere between $150-$200.

I am still looking for something that I would like, I am considering this Rock Shox XC 30 TK Disc Forks 2011

Do let me know what you think. If I do find anything used on this forum I may just purchased a used fork, but how reliable are used forks?

I have been posting updates on my thread DIY MTB Building, and getting advise from several users. This forum is awesome!


Cheers!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby smokez87 » Fri Jun 15, 2012 7:59 pm

Hi

just found out the details about the frame.

Frame Details
Frame Material Aluminium 7046 Alloy
Approx. Frame Weight (g) 1588
Seatpost Size (mm) 27.2
Seat Clamp Size (mm) 31.8
Front Mech Clamp Size (mm) 34.9
Wheels 26" x 2.3 tyres will just about fit, but we recommend 2.0 – 2.1" for best performance
Mudguard mounts None
Rack Mounts None
Bottle Cage Bosses 2 sets on all sizes except 14" which has 1 set.
Fork Travel 100mm MAX
Dropouts Vertical
Bottom Bracket shell 68mm, English threaded
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby NoobRider » Sun Jul 22, 2012 6:47 pm

I've been a commuter for several years and recently decided buy myself a MTB with budget of $500 - S600 (knowing that I will be upgrading after few month) After days of research online and numerous visits to bike shops, I've decided on Malvern Star XCS 3.0 / $550.
There seem to be a stigma attached to Malvern Star these days but I found XCS 3.0 to have the best components from all other brands in the price range.
I will be picking it up next weekend and wondering if anyone want to talk me out of buying Malvern Star and suggest alternative.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby usernameforme » Tue Aug 07, 2012 8:09 pm

Road.cc has published a first time buyer's guide. I think its good information and it should be useful to some newbies looking to get into cycling, especially with all the "which bike" threads around asking the same questions... I think that BNA should write up a similar article, if they haven't already...
I'm selling/swapping my Giant Defy Advanced see here
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby dRizzle » Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:52 am

Hi I'm pretty new to buying bikes. And need some general advice.

I am just after a fixie to ride to the pub and back about once a month or more (depending on summer weather).
I bought a bike off eBay in feb. but it was too small even riding once a month. Now selling it. lesson learnt. Try before buy.

I am 6'7" and 96kg. What is a good size I should look for. I want to buy one of those custom fixie's from a local Melbourne store. Willing to spend about $400. Friends have told me about Mojo, Jellybean, Bigshot and cellbikes etc.

Sorry if I have posted this in the wrong thread.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby jalm3yda » Wed Aug 29, 2012 10:13 pm

hi guys, thinking about buyng from a chinese site a frame to do a gravel grinder

http://www.hongfu-bikes.com/html_produc ... 9-269.html

do any of you have experience in this kind of sites!? should i be conserned about the material resistance!? and what about passing trough austrlian customs!? do i still have to pay anything extra!?

cheers
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby redsonic » Wed Sep 26, 2012 8:35 pm

Hi all,
This is my first post, and this looked like a good thread to start.
I currently ride a flat bar road bike which has a relatively upright position which suits me as I have had spinal surgery.
I am getting a bit fitter and faster and am looking at buying a drop bar bike (narrower tyres, lighter etc) and am wondering what I can do about the crouch? Can a stem do much to help lift the bars? Are there particular types of road bikes that are less crouched than others?
Any advice would be appreciated.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby usernameforme » Sun Sep 30, 2012 2:29 pm

redsonic wrote:Are there particular types of road bikes that are less crouched than others?


Specialized Sectur/Roubaix, Giant Defy, Trek Domane or Madone in H3 are the bikes that come to mind when someone asks me for a relaxed bike. There are PLENTY "sportive" geometry bikes out there. I'd say go around to a few shops and ask for bikes with a more upright/relaxed geometry.
I'm selling/swapping my Giant Defy Advanced see here
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby GC1986 » Mon Oct 01, 2012 5:20 pm

Hi everyone

I am a new Perth based member and would appreciate your thoughts re the purchase of my first road bike.

I'm only 5 foot tall, so it is quite difficult to find a frame that is small enough. I've been to 3 local bike shops and found an XXS Ridley Asteria (Sram Rival, Fulcram racing 7 tyres, frame weight approx 1150g and total bike weight minus pedals is 8.3kg) for $1800 and a XXS Kuota Kharma (Shimano 105- not sure of any other details) for $2000. The Ridley Asteria in particular looks like a good deal (rrp in 2012 was about $2700 or so), but I'm not terribly familiar with either brand. I've read several reviews on these bikes and also re the Shimano vs Sram debate. As I currently ride a flat bar, I'm not familiar with either gear changes, and don't really have a preference at this time. I've taken both bikes for a spin and seem to get the hang of Sram Rival ok. Interestingly, the man at the bike shop suggested that in his experience women tend to prefer Sram over Shimano??

I'm not constrained by a particular budget, but would prefer to spend maybe $2200 or less (unless I find something awesome that I must buy). That said, I would like to keep my first bike for as long as possible / and don't want to buy something that I'm likely to upgrade in the near future, so don't mind spending a little more to ensure that the bike lasts. I would prefer a full carbon frame if possible. It would also be good if the frame is light as I too am a light weight. I'd be happy to buy a very good second hand bike, but again am finding it difficult to find one in my size.

At this stage I can't see myself riding more than once a week for 35km or so. I may also start riding to work (10km each way), but realistically will only do this once or twice a week.

I'd love to hear any thoughts/experiences in relation to either bike. I'd also be very interested to hear if you know of any very small carbon frame bikes that fit my rough budget and have Shimano 105 or Sram Rival or above (I'm open to trying Campagnolo, but have not seen this on any of the bikes I've tried).

Thanks very much
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby wizdofaus » Mon Oct 22, 2012 7:07 pm

So I finished the 210k ATB yesterday on a hybrid with pretty chunky tyres and no cleats/toe-clips, in a pretty decent time (7h45m rolling time). It felt fantastic for the most part, but I know it'll be just that much more amazing when I'm on a bike that can keep up with the guys tearing up the Princes Fwy at 40+k/h, which was just too much work on my current wheels (I got to the end with plenty left in the tank, so the fitness seems to be there). I've skimmed through this thread, and I'd already decided I can definitely justify spending $2k, but given I'm sure I'm going to be doing a LOT more riding now (looking at all the fantastic event rides that are coming up over the next few months), wondering if it's worth spending more. Is it really that hard to avoid "upgraditis"? I've been riding a decent amount for the last 25 years and can count the number of bikes I've bought on one hand, so I was optimistically thinking that I should buy a bike that will be good for about the next 5 years, over which time I can definitely see myself doing more serious riding than I am now. Is there THAT much a difference between a $2K bike and a $3K bike? If a $3K bike will last me 4-5 years but a $2K one would only last 1 or 2 before I'd get frustrated with it then obviously it's worth shelling out the extra cash...

What amused the most during ATB was that it seemed virtually every rider I passed had obviously spent a lot more money on their bike and shoes and what-not than they had spent time in training. I'm pretty keen NOT to be that sort of rider :-P

BTW, one thing I am absolutely happy to spend extra money on is puncture resistant tyres. Even my current hybrid came with pretty crap tyres at first, replaced them after 3 punctures in one month and haven't had once since - thankfully, because I don't carry around a puncture kit (not even yesterday!). Considering how (relatively) inexpensive it is to upgrade tyres, and the minimal extra drag, it's surprising more people don't bother with them.
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby angelvalerie » Wed Oct 31, 2012 9:50 pm

I'd say that you should talk about the size and so on....I knew about getting the bike fit, but fell for the old line at Avanti Cannington "Oh, you don't have to pay anyone, we will do the bike fit as part of the service". Unfortunately, I found out the hard way (think physio bills) that really, getting a bike fit from a pro and then using that to shop would have been worth it.... wasted a small fortune in buying a bike that would be great - for somebody taller!!!! :(

Even worse when they admitted the error but then are saying they can't fix it!!!! :twisted:

So, go get a bike fit from someone who knows what they are doing, then go shopping!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby duncanf » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:18 pm

thanks for all the advice, it's good reading. If anyone knows where there are up to date bike maps of Melbourne that would be helpful too (all the ones I found on line seem to be out of date)
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Jeune » Thu Nov 15, 2012 12:40 pm

HI all,

I recently bought a second hand 2007 Giant CRX 3 in excellent condition for a pretty good price. Thing is, because I'm a newb Ive realised it's actually too small. It's 50cm and I'm 181cm. Didnt do enough research!

I'm trying to convince myself that it's ok but i know deep down its not.

Ideal scenario is to find some one in the opposite situation with a similar bike that's too big, so we can trade - unlikely, or just find someone out there with a similar but larger bike.

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Thanks!
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby AUbicycles » Thu Nov 15, 2012 1:31 pm

This is a basic calculator which I have used before:
http://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-tools/frame-sizer (select cm rather than inches)

50cm however is really too small for your height - in these forums you could try a trade however the chances of getting a match are slow (it is a small frame and a specific style of bike).
I assume that you would end up selling this bike - and if it is still in good condition you may be able to sell it for the same price (or at only a small loss).

Cheers
Christopher
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby usernameforme » Thu Nov 15, 2012 1:44 pm

AUbicycles wrote:in these forums you could try a trade however the chances of getting a match are slow

I've been looking for 170mm cranks for over a month now...
I'm selling/swapping my Giant Defy Advanced see here
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Re: Buying a bike: Some general advice for new riders

Postby Jeune » Thu Nov 15, 2012 1:57 pm

Yeah I didnt think the trade option was viable..just putting it out there.

I only just bought it so Im hoping to make some money on it.
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