Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

usernameforme
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Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby usernameforme » Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:46 pm

Hey guys:

not sure if this is the right place to ask about this, but I think that it would be healthy for this forum to have a wheelbuilding thread. I've noticed that other forums seem to have one and it looked like a great idea to me. Opinions?

Reman
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby Reman » Tue Oct 30, 2012 4:36 pm

I'm not fond of forum proliferation, one I liked is whirlpool where posts can be categorised which can the be clicked like a sub forum.

But there has been a few threads recently on wheel building....

frb_bike
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby frb_bike » Wed Oct 31, 2012 9:37 pm

I think this would be a good idea as wheelbuildling is considered a skill outside of normal bike mechanics...

I recently built a set of wheels and had to search high and low to get decent resources...

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RobertFrith
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby RobertFrith » Thu Nov 01, 2012 1:01 am

As I understand it there are forums, sub forums, threads and posts. This is a post that's part of the the thread that usernameforme created. So, looks to me like we now have a wheelbuilding thread. Yay :!:
Despite being an aged crone I only just got round to building my first wheelset a few months ago. There are a couple of posts about it in the thread I started a while back about an old bike I'm building up.

Precis; Roger Musson's book is gold. Building his truing stand isn't too hard, it's cheap and it works a treat. The wheels I built on it are symmetrical, for an SS frame, I've yet to do an asymmetric build but Musson's methodology is as clear for asymmetric builds as symmetric.
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usernameforme
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby usernameforme » Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:16 am

Well... since someone has added a resource to this thread, I might as well add my own :D

I think that Sheldon's article is quite good. Mike T's aricle is also useful.

For parts, I use bdopcycling.com and bikehubstore.com - these are the cheapest sources I have found so far.

If anyone was thinking about a cheap trueing stand, I've tried this one, for $35 it works well and you can build wheels with relative ease.

My tips for beginners:
-Stick with brass nipples
- don't use superlight weight rims (400g and below)
- standard lacing patterns and spoke counts (32 3x, 24/28 IF YOU MUST)
- get a proper spoke wrench
- avoid double butted spokes

high_tea
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby high_tea » Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:51 pm

usernameforme wrote:My tips for beginners:
-Stick with brass nipples
- don't use superlight weight rims (400g and below)
- standard lacing patterns and spoke counts (32 3x, 24/28 IF YOU MUST)
- get a proper spoke wrench
- avoid double butted spokes


Sounds like pretty good advice to me. One thing I don't follow: why the advice to avoid double butted spokes? I've never tried building a wheel with them, so I don't disagree, but most of what I've read on the subject says that they are a good thing. Just curious...

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biker jk
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby biker jk » Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:09 pm

high_tea wrote:
usernameforme wrote:My tips for beginners:
-Stick with brass nipples
- don't use superlight weight rims (400g and below)
- standard lacing patterns and spoke counts (32 3x, 24/28 IF YOU MUST)
- get a proper spoke wrench
- avoid double butted spokes


Sounds like pretty good advice to me. One thing I don't follow: why the advice to avoid double butted spokes? I've never tried building a wheel with them, so I don't disagree, but most of what I've read on the subject says that they are a good thing. Just curious...


It's harder to feel spoke wind up (or torsion) with butted spokes. However, butted spokes are superior as they allow more elongation when stressed so that the load is spread to other spokes rather than the rim (which could lead to cracked spoke holes).

usernameforme
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby usernameforme » Fri Nov 02, 2012 9:14 am

+1 to the post above, beat me to it. I'd personally start building with bladed spokes so you can see/prevent the spoke windup, but the cost is a bit prohibitive.

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kb
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby kb » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:07 pm

usernameforme wrote:+1 to the post above, beat me to it. I'd personally start building with bladed spokes so you can see/prevent the spoke windup, but the cost is a bit prohibitive.

Never built a wheel myself but if wind-up is an issue, how about spraying one side of the spokes with cheap hair colour? Should come off easily enough.
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usernameforme
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby usernameforme » Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:46 pm

I've never thought of that KB, If the hair colour doesn't damage the spokes that might be a simple way to gauge spoke wind-up. Wind-up isn't the biggest issue out there, but if you can see it why not? The only drawback I can think of is that you won't be able to hold the spoke in place like you do with bladed spokes.

ironhanglider
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby ironhanglider » Fri Nov 02, 2012 10:47 pm

usernameforme wrote:I've never thought of that KB, If the hair colour doesn't damage the spokes that might be a simple way to gauge spoke wind-up. Wind-up isn't the biggest issue out there, but if you can see it why not? The only drawback I can think of is that you won't be able to hold the spoke in place like you do with bladed spokes.


I don't find SWU a big issue, particularly with lubricated threads. I tend to hold the body of the spoke with my left hand whilst I turn the key with my right. That way I can feel any SWU and correct for it. That being said I do like semi-bladed (and expensive) spokes like CX-rays. (to me bladed means having to cut slots in the spoke holes of the hubs) My next build will be with semi-bladed spokes which are not CX-rays but cheaper.

If there is to be a wheelbuilding thread is it to be:
wheelbuilding engineering) "this is my method" leading to discussions of whether 2 cross is better than 3 cross, which method of stress relieving is best, or even necessary or
wheelbuilding art) "please admire my latest project",with photos of wheel porn, and discussions as to whether red or black looks faster or
wheelbuilding economics) "I got parts from these sources", leading to discussions of which stores are best to get which products from or
wheelbuilding planning) "what parts should I choose?" leading to discussions of carbon v aluminium, No. & type of spokes, shallow or deep rims, eyletted or not and whether a rail-trail is really off-road etc.

There are probably lots of examples of each of these which could be resurrected.

Cheers,

Cameron
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usernameforme
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Re: Should we have a wheelbuilding thread

Postby usernameforme » Sat Nov 03, 2012 12:46 pm

Speaking of spoke nipple lubricant, I should add that to my tips for first timers. I personally use linseed oil, it works as a lube when its wet, and when it starts drying out it starts locking the thread. The downsides I've noticed are that it smells terrible (to some people, I'm used to it from when I used to play cricket), and if you leave the build for a while and the oil dries out, it makes your job much harder as it acts a bit like a thread-locker.

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