To Ding or not to Ding

open topic, for anything cycling related.

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby VRE » Fri Feb 08, 2013 7:50 pm

coyote wrote:
or a cow.


Now there is a good idea, tie a cow bell off the top tube of your bike and as you move around while riding your bike, the bell will ring all by it self allowing one to keep their hands on the brakes in case something unexpected happens. 8) :idea:

I've always thought one of the most appealing things about bicycles is that they're nice and quiet. Provided you warn pedestrians who may be blocking your way (by whatever method you prefer), why turn the bicycle into a noisy machine?
User avatar
VRE
 
Posts: 582
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:14 am
Location: Ringwood North, VIC, Australia

by BNA » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:01 pm

BNA
 

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby coyote » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:01 pm

VRE wrote:
coyote wrote:
or a cow.


Now there is a good idea, tie a cow bell off the top tube of your bike and as you move around while riding your bike, the bell will ring all by it self allowing one to keep their hands on the brakes in case something unexpected happens. 8) :idea:

I've always thought one of the most appealing things about bicycles is that they're nice and quiet. Provided you warn pedestrians who may be blocking your way (by whatever method you prefer), why turn the bicycle into a noisy machine?


To make sure everybody remains safe and unhurt. 8)
User avatar
coyote
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 2:33 pm
Location: Cairns - Queensland

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby Timeonabike » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:37 pm

I always ding, and when on foot appreciate being dung, er, dinged.
Cardboard flaps held to the spokes with clothes pegs anyone?
Cheers
Time
Timeonabike
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby Summernight » Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:03 pm

Timeonabike wrote:I always ding, and when on foot appreciate being dung, er, dinged.
Cardboard flaps held to the spokes with clothes pegs anyone?
Cheers
Time


One of my old work colleagues bought this:



:shock:

I think it was a joke present...
User avatar
Summernight
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:40 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby high_tea » Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:14 pm

I did, in my misspent youth, try yelling out "Ping!" instead of ringing a bell. Complete waste of time.
high_tea
 
Posts: 1209
Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2010 8:10 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby Timeonabike » Fri Feb 08, 2013 10:31 pm

Summernight wrote:
Timeonabike wrote:I always ding, and when on foot appreciate being dung, er, dinged.
Cardboard flaps held to the spokes with clothes pegs anyone?
Cheers
Time


One of my old work colleagues bought this:



:shock:

I think it was a joke present...


Superb!
Timeonabike
 
Posts: 92
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:51 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby VRE » Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:17 pm

coyote wrote:
VRE wrote:
coyote wrote:Now there is a good idea, tie a cow bell off the top tube of your bike and as you move around while riding your bike, the bell will ring all by it self allowing one to keep their hands on the brakes in case something unexpected happens. 8) :idea:

I've always thought one of the most appealing things about bicycles is that they're nice and quiet. Provided you warn pedestrians who may be blocking your way (by whatever method you prefer), why turn the bicycle into a noisy machine?


To make sure everybody remains safe and unhurt. 8)

Doesn't work too well for cars.
User avatar
VRE
 
Posts: 582
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 9:14 am
Location: Ringwood North, VIC, Australia

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby RonK » Sat Feb 09, 2013 9:34 am

twizzle wrote:The general assumption (based on experience) is that headphones result in complete loss of awareness for the wearer.

Only pedestrians though - cycling wearers never loose awareness. ;)
Last edited by RonK on Sat Feb 09, 2013 6:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...
User avatar
RonK
 
Posts: 4919
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby WyvernRH » Sat Feb 09, 2013 5:47 pm

RonK wrote:
twizzle wrote:The general assumption (based on experience) is that headphones result in complete loss of awareness for the wearer.

Only pedestrians though - cycling wearers never loose awareness.

You forgot the smiley ! :wink:
Actually, I've been out on the Fernleigh Track in Newcastle (twixt Adamstown and Redhead) most days over the last few weeks and I would say that the cyclist earphone wearer count was pretty low, approaching zero in fact. Whereas the pedestrian earphone wearer count was maybe about 30%, mostly fitter female walkers in 'sports' wear. Even these often had one earphone out so they could hear 'real world' stuff. Dog owners in the morning seemed to have it all under control as well. All in all everyone seemed to be getting on OK.
No idea what it is like at the weekend tho, probably hell on earth as the bogans rise out of the wood work :)
Cheers
Richard
WyvernRH
 
Posts: 1625
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 5:41 pm
Location: Newcastle NSW

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby vince » Sun Feb 10, 2013 7:51 pm

Ding.....................................................no response,
ding...................................................no response,
ding,
" ALRIGHT I ( EXPLETIVE ) HEARD YOU ( EXPLETIVE )!!!!!!!!!!!!! "
but he still remained in the centre of the path almost daring me to clip him, so i braced myself and picked my passing spot and got by unscathed. i tell ya, in my angry young days it may have been a different story. ah well, i guess some people are just angry with the world
2011 Fuji Roubaix 1
"Man plans, God laughs"
User avatar
vince
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Sun Jan 11, 2009 6:37 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby munga » Sun Feb 10, 2013 8:06 pm

"THEN ( EXPLETIVE ) MOVE OVER, ( EXPLETIVE)"
pitty43 wrote:Thanks all for your help. Better change my Gumtree add now.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/retroclassiccycling/
User avatar
munga
 
Posts: 6390
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 2:17 pm
Location: wowe

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby gorilla monsoon » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:34 am

WyvernRH wrote:
RonK wrote:
twizzle wrote:The general assumption (based on experience) is that headphones result in complete loss of awareness for the wearer.

Only pedestrians though - cycling wearers never loose awareness.

You forgot the smiley ! :wink:
Actually, I've been out on the Fernleigh Track in Newcastle (twixt Adamstown and Redhead) most days over the last few weeks and I would say that the cyclist earphone wearer count was pretty low, approaching zero in fact. Whereas the pedestrian earphone wearer count was maybe about 30%, mostly fitter female walkers in 'sports' wear. Even these often had one earphone out so they could hear 'real world' stuff. Dog owners in the morning seemed to have it all under control as well. All in all everyone seemed to be getting on OK.
No idea what it is like at the weekend tho, probably hell on earth as the bogans rise out of the wood work :)
Cheers
Richard


Was on the track between 8 and 10am yesterday. A lot of riders out (training for Loop the Lake probably) and everyone pretty much behaving themselves, riders and walkers/joggers. I did note though that a lot of peds acknowledged the sound of the bell, either with a single step left or a wave of the hand. Some even said thanks.

Here's a question though: why do some riders choose not to warn other riders they are overtaking them? Yesterday I had a few overtaking riders call: "Passing" or "Overtaking" but more who chose to do nothing, just roll on by without warning. Passing a ped without warning is one thing because it is a relatively quick exercise but passing another rider who is going at somewhere near your speed is another thing entirely.

Are good manners and courtesy dead? Please tell me because I just don't know whether I should stay as Mr Nice Guy or start taking ar$e-ole lessons :evil: .
Some days you are a big, strutting rooster, some days you are a bit chicken and some days you are just a complete cocque. Roger Ramjet: 2009 Giant CRX3 Spockette: 2009 Trek FX 7.3 (WSD, property of Mrs Monsoon) Lady Penelope: 2011 Avanti Cadent 1.0 TdF
User avatar
gorilla monsoon
 
Posts: 2663
Joined: Tue Aug 26, 2008 10:45 am
Location: Central Coast/Lake Macquarie

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby twizzle » Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:03 pm

gorilla monsoon wrote:Here's a question though: why do some riders choose not to warn other riders they are overtaking them?


Mate and I were crossing Commonwealth Avenue Bridge post brekky one morning, I was tail, he was lead, we were approaching two peds from behind and needed to pull out to overtake. I did the reflex head check, but my mate didn't... nearly got cleaned up by this tosser. It was obvious to blind freddy that we were going to pull out to pass the pedestrians, but he abused my mate for trying to pull across in front of him!

Just lucky for him he went off down a side path, otherwise he was going to cop some serious abuse when we caught up to him.

Seriously - I'm amazed that people ride bicycles like this. If they did it in cars, the road toll would be huge. How does the smallest vestige of common sense disappear when some people are on a bike?
I ride, therefore I am.
...real cyclists don't have squeaky chains...
User avatar
twizzle
 
Posts: 6382
Joined: Wed Aug 13, 2008 11:45 am
Location: Taking a break.

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby munga » Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:08 pm

i blame this:

pitty43 wrote:Thanks all for your help. Better change my Gumtree add now.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/retroclassiccycling/
User avatar
munga
 
Posts: 6390
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 2:17 pm
Location: wowe

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby g-boaf » Mon Feb 11, 2013 10:50 pm

gorilla monsoon wrote:
Was on the track between 8 and 10am yesterday. A lot of riders out (training for Loop the Lake probably) and everyone pretty much behaving themselves, riders and walkers/joggers. I did note though that a lot of peds acknowledged the sound of the bell, either with a single step left or a wave of the hand. Some even said thanks.

Here's a question though: why do some riders choose not to warn other riders they are overtaking them? Yesterday I had a few overtaking riders call: "Passing" or "Overtaking" but more who chose to do nothing, just roll on by without warning. Passing a ped without warning is one thing because it is a relatively quick exercise but passing another rider who is going at somewhere near your speed is another thing entirely.

Are good manners and courtesy dead? Please tell me because I just don't know whether I should stay as Mr Nice Guy or start taking ar$e-ole lessons :evil: .


These ones who fly past without giving any notice drive me mad. I usually go after them and if u do manage to catch them, I'll have a chat with them. But so often it's a guy out training with his buddy wheel sucking at 45km/h on a shared path (a reasonable size one). Yes I could just about catch them - but I'd just as much not bother. That's at my physical limits holding that speed for a long time. :oops:
Image
g-boaf
 
Posts: 3330
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2011 6:11 pm
Location: Sydney

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby il padrone » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:08 pm

Please do be aware that it is simply good manners and courtesy (and certainly not essential in all situations). I know I don't always do it - depends on the situation and rider.

It isn't a legal requirement. What is a legal requirement is for all riders to maintain a steady line, and to signal any changes from that, as well as not moving into the path of other cyclists. Rear-view mirror use certainly helps here. Overtakers must overtake safely - I'd read that as allowing sufficient room and an appropriate speed difference for the conditions. No hard rules - it all depends on the circumstances. But expecting a bell-ring from every overtaking cyclist, every time, is ridiculous :roll: .

Do you expect the same from every overtaking driver, a horn honk??

twizzle wrote:I did the reflex head check, but my mate didn't... nearly got cleaned up by this tosser.

With respect, there is your problem. I'm sorry to say it but I believe your mate was also a 'tosser' :|
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 17468
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby warthog1 » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:02 am

munga wrote:i blame this:




:lol: :lol:
User avatar
warthog1
 
Posts: 2236
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2012 4:40 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby rdp_au » Tue Feb 12, 2013 10:08 am

Did my first ride in a month on Saturday and the recalcitrant ITB wasn’t too bad – yay! I was on a main road, no shared paths or pedestrians but lots of bikes out enjoying the cooler conditions, and I found myself passing quite a few. For riders who were obviously aware of what was around them and doing regular head-checks, I would give them plenty of room and pass without first calling out. I would say ‘hello’ or ‘good morning’ as I pulled alongside. In every case I got a favourable response. For slower riders, or those who appeared to be in a world of their own, I would slow behind them, pick a safe place to pass, and call out ‘passing on your right’. Again, seemed to work OK. I use a rear vision mirror (essential on a recumbent) which means I am almost never surprised by faster bikes coming past, just humbled :oops: I didn’t use my bell at all. That gets used when passing pedestrians on shared paths on my commutes. Horses for courses.
User avatar
rdp_au
 
Posts: 467
Joined: Wed Feb 07, 2007 4:45 pm
Location: Hornsby, Sydney, NSW

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby hewey » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:39 am

A nice honk from one of these puppies 10m out is perfect. Loud enough to get people's attention, but friendly/funny enough that you almost always get a smile :mrgreen:
Image
hewey
 
Posts: 144
Joined: Sat Jun 19, 2010 10:29 pm

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby munga » Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:07 pm

"oh look, they've let hewey out for the day. how quaint"
pitty43 wrote:Thanks all for your help. Better change my Gumtree add now.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/retroclassiccycling/
User avatar
munga
 
Posts: 6390
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 2:17 pm
Location: wowe

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby bychosis » Thu Feb 14, 2013 6:36 am

There are several types of bell required, I only have one fitted to my bike and it always sounds the same. I don't generally use my voice as a warning.
Assume on a shared path for the following examples.
1. Courtesy: hello there, I'm approaching on a bike just letting you know. Carry on. ie maintain your line and there will be no issues.
2. Caution: hi, you appear to be a little unaware of your surrounds and don't look like you are maintaining your line and may move into my path.
3. Warning: this is a shared path you are not using shared path etiquette, please move back left etc.
4. Expletive deleted: what the ... are you doing? We just about collided.

As the response to a bell varies from ignorance to acknowledgement, fright or anger I have adopted the following. The response of ignorance/acknowledgement is most often with 1-2, fright anger with 3-4 but not always.

Generally I use
1. Infrequently(one ding), these people may get a fright and I don't want to sound pushy when their progress has no impact on my own.
2. Usually(one ding), most of the time it wakes them up and we can both get on with it.
3. As required (couple of dings) often followed by a polite vocal "please keep left" etc after passing.
4. Rarely (many dings) most often evasive action is required so braking and steering mo important than ding. Often vocal response is all there is time for- avoid expletives where possible.
bychosis (bahy-koh-sis): A mental disorder of delusions indicating impaired contact with a reality of no bicycles.
User avatar
bychosis
 
Posts: 1728
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2012 12:10 pm
Location: Lake Macquarie

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby il padrone » Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:59 am

Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 17468
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby Summernight » Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:12 am



He's using a flat bar... *brain explodes* :P

I'm interested in that bell if it actually works. Do they sell them in Australia?
User avatar
Summernight
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:40 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby il padrone » Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:16 am

Their address is Mt Waverley. They list a pretty good range of shops in Melbourne as dealers.

Bayswater Cycles, Ivanhoe Cycles, Mt Waverley Cycles, lots more.
Riding bikes in traffic - what seems dangerous is usually safe; what seems safe is often more dangerous.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 17468
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: To Ding or not to Ding

Postby Summernight » Thu Feb 14, 2013 10:21 am

il padrone wrote:Their address is Mt Waverley. They list a pretty good range of shops in Melbourne as dealers.

Bayswater Cycles, Ivanhoe Cycles, Mt Waverley Cycles, lots more.


Thanks. Will have to make a trip to a shop to check them out.
User avatar
Summernight
 
Posts: 1392
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2012 2:40 pm
Location: Melbourne

PreviousNext

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Dragster1, ryleyhs



Support BNA
Click for online shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Cycling Express Cycling Express
Ebay Ebay AU
ProBikeKit ProBikeKit UK
Evans Cycles Evans Cycles UK
JensonUSA Jenson USA
JensonUSA Competitive Cyclist