Cycling in Winter

open topic, for anything cycling related.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby Aushiker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:58 am

Red Rider wrote: I might try some sort of thin leggings though, and some of the merino stuff mentioned sounds very cosy :)


I find a pair of Skins does the trick with the chilly mornings, cold evenings commuting to and from work.

Andrew
User avatar
Aushiker
 
Posts: 20153
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA

by BNA » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:24 pm

BNA
 

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby lloyd83 » Fri Mar 22, 2013 12:24 pm

If it is icy cold, my tip would be to have a hot cup of Milo and do some some starjumps or whatever to get the blood circulating before cycling or just cycle faster to warm up :)

No point in wearing insulation if your body is cold - just like putting an ice cube in a thermos, it will stay cold.. If you cycle really slow like my missus then you would never warm up so you would probably need the layers.

I used to cycle in London in the snow and get all hot and sweaty once I got to work if I wore too many layers, thickish gloves and buff as a balaclava which would send steam up and fog my glasses. Then I thought blood is the best way to warm and regulate your temperature so I dressed much lighter with a layer to keep the wind and rain out that was breathable. Plus it was 'normal' to cycle in your office attire so I didn't want to be sweaty, although I just wore my button shirt (saving it from being crinkled) and some weather proof shorts.

Now, I'm in Melbourne and my commute three times longer, I think I'll just put on the wind vest and mudguards. I'm going to stick with the fingerless gloves for now and see how it goes when winter sets in.

Also, baklava would provide a nice layer of insulation, if you eat enough of it...
lloyd83
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby il padrone » Fri Mar 22, 2013 1:26 pm

lloyd83 wrote:Plus it was 'normal' to cycle in your office attire so I didn't want to be sweaty, although I just wore my button shirt (saving it from being crinkled) and some weather proof shorts.

OP is cycling a 10km commute. At this distance it still reasonably viable to ride in office clothes. I do this (well, a buttoned shirt and 'office-suitable cycling trousers, and my SPD shoes that get changed at work). The most important part of my winter wardrobe is my Rapha short-sleeved merino base-layer top. It absorbs sweat, wicks it away and does not stink. As mentioned earlier I also have a good rainjacket that gives good wind protection too, and if it rains, overpants and booties. For days that are just col air I either wear the rainjacket or a windstopper vest and the full-finger gloves.

I commute 10kms in this and if kunalraiker does not have change facilities this will be feasible for hm. If there are change facilities and lockers it will be an even choice whether to ride in work clothes or do the whole quick-change thing eg. friends of mine who ride to the CBD from out in Northcote about 8-9kms and choose to wear office clothes even though there are change facilities available at work.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18434
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby kunalraiker » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:04 pm

il padrone wrote:
lloyd83 wrote:Plus it was 'normal' to cycle in your office attire so I didn't want to be sweaty, although I just wore my button shirt (saving it from being crinkled) and some weather proof shorts.

OP is cycling a 10km commute. At this distance it still reasonably viable to ride in office clothes. I do this (well, a buttoned shirt and 'office-suitable cycling trousers, and my SPD shoes that get changed at work). The most important part of my winter wardrobe is my Rapha short-sleeved merino base-layer top. It absorbs sweat, wicks it away and does not stink. As mentioned earlier I also have a good rainjacket that gives good wind protection too, and if it rains, overpants and booties. For days that are just col air I either wear the rainjacket or a windstopper vest and the full-finger gloves.

I commute 10kms in this and if kunalraiker does not have change facilities this will be feasible for hm. If there are change facilities and lockers it will be an even choice whether to ride in work clothes or do the whole quick-change thing eg. friends of mine who ride to the CBD from out in Northcote about 8-9kms and choose to wear office clothes even though there are change facilities available at work.



I do have change facilities and use them currently, riding with work clothes is out of question as I do sweat a bit and would not like to be in that state throughout the day.
kunalraiker
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby il padrone » Fri Mar 22, 2013 2:21 pm

kunalraiker wrote:riding with work clothes is out of question as I do sweat a bit and would not like to be in that state throughout the day.

I can assure you, that does not happen. You have a pretty flat commute so few hills to work up a real sweat. On arrival, you will break out in a bit of a sweat, so the trick is

1. Dress lighter, to suit the weather; carry your jacket in your bag, or leave it in the office. In winter wear a merino undershirt to absorb perspiration,
2. Pedal easier for the last 1-2kms,
3. Take a little time to cool down on arrival, relax while locking you bike etc. If possible (not always so for me) avoid going straight into a heated office
4. Go to the facilities and have a sparrow-bath - splash the face; wipe down the chest, neck and under-arms with baby-wipes; apply some roll-on deodorant. All this takes just a few minutes.

In fact in the winter months I rarely have to go through this whole routine as on most cold mornings I barely even work up a sweat.

A bit of sweat is manageable, and contrary to the publicity of the deodorant industry, it will not create BO until bacteria breed up.... takes 12-24hrs generally. Perspiration is after all mostly just water and a bit of salt. Don't get conned into the ultra-clean myth, part of the reason we have such a huge car-dependence going on.

As the motto on my then-teenage son's Lynx said - "never underestimate the power of smell" :lol: :lol: :roll: Utter carp.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18434
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby wurtulla wabbit » Fri Mar 22, 2013 9:46 pm

il padrone wrote:
wurtulla wabbit wrote:5 deg isn't cold really, used to go out in a T shirt, denims and waterproof camo over trousers on my quad bike mid winter :D.

These guys probably "weren't cold" either. Not what I'd be doing though :shock:

Image


That looks great !

I've broken ice going for a dive in a quarry about 10 years ago, New Year's Day !

About minus 3, wind chill about minus 10, was under neath barely zero.

Visibility was great ! :D
User avatar
wurtulla wabbit
 
Posts: 513
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 8:08 pm

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby DavidS » Sun Mar 24, 2013 12:32 am

barefoot wrote:
il padrone wrote:As the archetypal 'thin man', in 5-10 degs I will be wearing knicks under tights and on the torso a merino-thermal, long sleeve jersey and my Frosty Boy windstopper fleece. Maybe with full gloves as well to begin with if it's closer to 5 deg.

As an archetypal not-thin man :oops: , and one who is acclimatised to cold weather, I concur.

Below about 15, I'll wear a merino undershirt. Long sleeved if it's below 12. I'd have a good think about adding a fleece vest or (lightweight) tights below 10, depending what the temperature is likely to do while I'm out. Almost certainly wearing both at 5.

Below 5dgC, there's a fair likelihood that I'll stay in bed instead of going for a recreational ride... and my commutes (at any temperature, I have no other feasible way of getting to work) are short enough that different strategies apply. But I'd be into the scull caps and a shell layer to keep the wind out.

Knicks and jersey at 5dg is hard, mad or Scottish.

tim


If I wore all that I'd cook. I cycle in <5 degrees in shorts, T shirt and a jacket. I still get to work feeling warm enough. Still, we are all different so wear what suits you.

DS
User avatar
DavidS
 
Posts: 1329
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:24 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby FuzzyDropbear » Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:46 pm

I love cycling in Winter, I rekon the winters seem less cold than they were before I started cycling. Plus, it doesn't really get too cold here (we're not putting on studded tyres!).

For my commuter, I bit the bullet and put on some front and rear mudguards. They don't look too bad, but I'm not really a fan of mudguards, but they're practical and I was honestly surprised at what a difference those Crud Catchers made.
    My backpack had a built in cover, so I didn't need to waterproof my pack.
    Clipless pedals: I didn't get covers, but I find that if i stuff them with old newspaper (sourced from tea room) and change it a couple of times, they're dry by home time.
    Lights - Katmandu have a USB rechargeable set which I used all through last winter and hardly missed a beat, they're on sale now for $30 and are worth that [they went funny for a while but fixed themselves]. Bright but not super bright. I also bought a 1600 Lumen magicshine light off ebay for $150 and it's overkill for commuting, but I use it for winter early morning rides on the MTB as well.
    Image
    I also got some spoke lights from FocalPrice for a couple of bucks a pop to help side on visibility and they work a treat (be prepared to wait for shipping, takes around a month to arrive from memory).
    My Jacket - I got the charcoal one, but bloke at work got the orange one and I rekon for visibility, it would be the better one to get.
    Gloves - I have BBB Coldzone gloves for late autumn/early spring and BBB ColdShield (sorry couldn't find a link) for winter.
    Pants - I just wear shorts although a mate has bought some leg warmers and swears by them and may be convinced during winter to order some :lol:
    Also keep a spare pair of underwear and socks in your pack.
    I also have a beanie under the helmet which helps the head.

The main points from me are some lights ($30), mudguards ($23), gloves (roughly $50 for the coldshield ones I bought) and jacket ($50 - $80). But as you've probably seen, everyone's different when it comes to cold weather riding. Seems a bit expensive, but stuff should last more than a season, but the stuff I've bought has lasted me 1 - 2 winters and still going strong.

I concur with Tim Re: Ballarat winters, as such I'm going to be buying one of these to keep my chin from getting to chilly this winter 8) or a stubble one....

Cheers.
User avatar
FuzzyDropbear
 
Posts: 296
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:55 pm
Location: Ballarat, VIC

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby kunalraiker » Wed Apr 03, 2013 7:45 pm

I was told, I know I know by you guys not to buy the cheap stuff.
Anyway got this cheap wind jacket but it doesn't breathe since there are no vents.

Any recommendations on a cheap ventilated wind jacket, not looking for any thermal properties - just pure wind protection.
kunalraiker
 
Posts: 448
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 11:44 am

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby roobab » Wed Apr 03, 2013 9:25 pm

Melbourne in winter. Windchill is the biggest problem.
Full finger gloves, a good baselayer, with normal jersey up top, arm warmers, leg warmers, neoprene shoe covers, baklava on your head.
roobab
 
Posts: 161
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:13 pm
Location: Melbourne VIC

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby clackers » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:04 pm

Those one degree spring mornings I actually go with two sets of gloves ... Kathmandu merino inners and a relatively thin pair of windproof outers.
User avatar
clackers
 
Posts: 1968
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 10:48 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby il padrone » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:45 pm

kunalraiker wrote:Any recommendations on a cheap ventilated wind jacket, not looking for any thermal properties - just pure wind protection.

Have you considered a windproof vest? I have an excellent one that is windproof front and shoulders but mesh back, keeps me warm in the torso but not overheated. If it's really cold air I just wear my Showers Pass rain jacket with the pit-zips and cuffs open.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18434
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby barefoot » Thu Apr 04, 2013 5:55 am

roobab wrote: baklava on your head.

Image
User avatar
barefoot
 
Posts: 988
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 10:05 am
Location: Ballarat

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby Howzat » Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:31 am

kunalraiker wrote:I was told, I know I know by you guys not to buy the cheap stuff.
Anyway got this cheap wind jacket but it doesn't breathe since there are no vents.

Any recommendations on a cheap ventilated wind jacket, not looking for any thermal properties - just pure wind protection.

"Cheap" depends on your timescale. If it's too cheap, you might have to buy it again before too long, and that can be more expensive over time.

I'm guessing this economic wrinkle is partly the reason why BigW, Target, etc have such big stores and revenues - people keep on saving money buying the same thing every three months :roll:

For cheap-over-the-longer-term recommendations, the Mont Hammerhead and Showers Pass jackets get good marks. [edit] adding, these are wet-weather as well as windproof jackets.
User avatar
Howzat
 
Posts: 535
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:08 pm
Location: Canberra

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby Venus62 » Thu Apr 04, 2013 11:57 am

barefoot wrote:
roobab wrote: baklava on your head.

Image


I lol'd
Venus62
 
Posts: 235
Joined: Wed Dec 05, 2012 11:55 am
Location: Brisbane

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby FuzzyDropbear » Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:00 pm

Howzat wrote:
kunalraiker wrote:I was told, I know I know by you guys not to buy the cheap stuff.
...
I'm guessing this economic wrinkle is partly the reason why BigW, Target, etc have such big stores and revenues - people keep on saving money buying the same thing every three months :roll:
...


Yep, had this discussion with a random bloke in the hardware store, I was buying a good garden fork when he wandered up with his partner and picked up the cheapest one he could find. She asked him why he wasn't buying a more expensive one like 'the other guy' and he replied that he could buy 3 for the price of the one I was holding. So as I walked past I commented that yes, that was indeed the case, but at least I wouldn't be the monkey wasting time by driving back to the hardware store multiple times to buy the same item. The look on the guys face was priceless. :roll:
User avatar
FuzzyDropbear
 
Posts: 296
Joined: Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:55 pm
Location: Ballarat, VIC

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby JohnJoyner » Thu Apr 04, 2013 12:10 pm

I don't bother with any type of waterproof jacket or anything, they never breath. At the most a windproof vest that can be easily removed if too hot.
I have a 20 odd km commute, so leave about 7am, can be pretty cold out south-westish in the mornings.
On a clear crisp morning - I usually start with 2 pairs of gloves, both long fingered, one a nice toastie pair, the other thinner. 2 pairs of socks, including a thermal pair. Leg & arm warmers, a beanie (cycling specific) this is mainly cause I have no hair (well, I shave my head. I am also slightly follicly challenged. :) ) and it keeps the ears nice & toastie too. And it's easily removable when stopped at lights. A thin base layer & top & sometimes the wind vest mentioned above.
I usually stop about half way at the most & remove most outer layers. Takes a few minutes, but I am not a fan of the cold.

JJ
User avatar
JohnJoyner
 
Posts: 273
Joined: Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:07 am
Location: Sydney

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby Kwaichang » Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:24 pm

roobab wrote:Melbourne in winter. Windchill is the biggest problem.
Full finger gloves, a good baselayer, with normal jersey up top, arm warmers, leg warmers, neoprene shoe covers, baklava on your head.

And a balaclava in your mouth!
User avatar
Kwaichang
 
Posts: 151
Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:51 pm

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby lloyd83 » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:32 pm

I would recommend that you invest what you can afford on a good quality shell jacket that is windproof, water resistant and breathes eg. Gortex Paclite for rain or Gore Windstopper for drizzle. I think a jacket would be fine for your 10km commute but if cycling further a vest would be best as you'll get too hot at the end of the ride even if you have pit zips.

I have all three for various conditions and activities and shop around for a good deal to avoid their heavily marked up retail price. They last for years and you'll use it a lot as you're cycling everyday then you'll wear it when travelling around the world, camping, going out and whatever activity which exposes you to the elements. Think of it as an investment as those cheapies will make you sweat, uncomfortable and will de-laminate in no time, then you'll be a monkey going back to the shops buying a replacement.

However, I believe that you shouldn't waste money on a more expensive item if you will hardly use it eg. a specialised tool which you will only use once or driving a 4WD in the city (w*ankers :)

I guess now you just have to try what works for you as it will be a trial and error process what makes you more comfortable.

ps. I probably wear more layers once I'm in the office as I'm sitting still in the poorly operating aircon system
lloyd83
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby barefoot » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:44 pm

lloyd83 wrote:I would recommend that you invest what you can afford on a good quality shell jacket that is windproof, water resistant and breathes eg. Gortex Paclite for rain or Gore Windstopper for drizzle.

I have both and they cost a bomb but have lasted me for years and you'll use it a lot


Then just be careful going around corners on wet wintery roads.

Ask me about the hole in the elbow of my Ground Effect shell jacket :cry:

I still wear it in preference to the cheaper one I bought to replace it. It's just a little bit too ventilated in one place.

tim
User avatar
barefoot
 
Posts: 988
Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2008 10:05 am
Location: Ballarat

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby clackers » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:53 pm

lloyd83 wrote:I would recommend that you invest what you can afford on a good quality shell jacket that is windproof, water resistant and breathes eg. Gortex Paclite for rain or Gore Windstopper for drizzle. I think a jacket would be fine for your 10km commute but if cycling further a vest would be best as you'll get too hot at the end of the ride even if you have pit zips.


That's my experience, too, Lloyd. I went through several cheapies until settling on the ones that have 2.5 layers or whatever the marketeers call them these days. Wish I'd had the guts to spend properly earlier on.

If you don't have the moolah upfront, Kunalraiker, you can settle for an inexpensive vest and some arm warmers you can take off after the first ten minutes of many rides.
User avatar
clackers
 
Posts: 1968
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 10:48 am
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby lloyd83 » Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:05 pm

same - you go through a development process and start off with the cheapies but then you're better informed of what you want in your next upgrade :) No point blowing out on something then realise "i should have got one with this..." However stores are pretty good with offering exchanges these days.

but if you're strapped for cash, you gotta stick to your budget or even try and find second hand which I try to do too or just drink less beer...or home brew
lloyd83
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Sun May 20, 2012 9:06 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby il padrone » Thu Apr 04, 2013 4:12 pm

JohnJoyner wrote:a beanie (cycling specific) this is mainly cause I have no hair (well, I shave my head. I am also slightly follicly challenged. :) )

Living in Melbourne and commuting year-round, I would almost never wear my nice merino beanie on my commute rides. I am similarly follically-challenged with a no. 1 clippers cut.
User avatar
il padrone
 
Posts: 18434
Joined: Mon Apr 07, 2008 11:57 pm
Location: Heading for home.

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby DavidS » Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:41 pm

I don't feel the cold much so, although follically challenged a beanie is unnecessary for me. The lump of foam I'm forced to wear makes my head sweat enough already.

A decent jacket is essential. I recently bought one and haven't used it yet but jackets are definitely the go. You start out cold with the jacket all zipped up, warm up a bit and you can undo part or all of the front and if you get really warm you can take it off. Very flexible because riding you will feel cold at first with the wind going through you but warm later when you have been riding for a while. I don't wear my jerseys except on warm days so just a T Shirt under my jacket in winter. Don't worry about the legs, they won't get cold in our now mild Melbourne winters (did I mention I don't feel the cold and you should do what suits you?), I just wear shorts.

DS
User avatar
DavidS
 
Posts: 1329
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:24 pm
Location: Melbourne

Re: Cycling in Winter

Postby wurtulla wabbit » Thu Apr 04, 2013 10:58 pm

I wet shave my head and I love the thermal loss it has in winter while playing sport....
User avatar
wurtulla wabbit
 
Posts: 513
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2012 8:08 pm

PreviousNext

Return to General discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Hugor, the fat climber



Popular Bike Shops
Torpedo 7 Torpedo7 AU
Ground Effect Ground Effect NZ
Chain Reaction Cycles CRC UK
Wiggle Wiggle UK
Ebay Ebay AU

“Bicycles BNA Twitter
“Bicycles BNA Facebook
“Google+ BNA Google+
“Bicycles BNA Newsletter

> FREE BNA Stickers
> BNA Cycling Kit