Stoves and Cookwear

User avatar
Cheesewheel
Posts: 978
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 9:22 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Cheesewheel » Fri Nov 03, 2017 7:44 am

https://www.massdrop.com/buy/50420

Mass drop are doing the Snow Peak Multi Compact Titanium Cookset for about $77 usd delivered (not a smashing deal, but still cheaper than anywhere else atm)

Image

These are ideal for "wet" cooking .... I can manage to cook rice via the absorption method without burning it (most of the time :mrgreen: ) .... not sure how the skillets would function in any frying application
Go!Run!GAH!

User avatar
Aushiker
Posts: 22194
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Mon Nov 06, 2017 4:06 pm

Another cooking set option from Massdrop - Snow Peak Trek Series Pots w/ Lids - Starting at $AU$58 on your stove.

Image
Andrew
Image

maxknott
Posts: 104
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2012 7:16 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby maxknott » Tue Nov 14, 2017 6:02 pm

i found aliexpress to be cheapest when i was looking fir ti cookware

User avatar
Aushiker
Posts: 22194
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:53 am

Massdrop has a couple stove options at the moment. Might be worth checking out ...

Kovea Spider Remote Canister Stove (AT) US$44.25

Image

Snow Peak Litemax Titanium Stove @US$55.49

Image
Andrew
Image

Trevtassie
Posts: 641
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2015 10:57 am

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Trevtassie » Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:06 pm

I got my spider from ebay https://m.ebay.com.au/itm/KOVEA-SPIDER- ... SwgmJX1gYu A$54 including postage. I use it with bunnings butane cartridges which are $4.45 for 4 ATM. Needs this adapter https://m.ebay.com.au/itm/Hiking-Useful ... SwJxlZjRif You start the stove with the cylinder notch upwards, then flip the cylinder so it feeds liquid has to the stove, you end up with full heat from cheap butane
One thing to watch with the spider is that the top is slippery you need to hold the pot handle when stirring

iNGE
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:03 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby iNGE » Sat Mar 31, 2018 5:40 pm

Just happen to bump on to this thread - and since I am always interested in what people use to cook on and with, I had a scan through it. Looks like you guys in Australia use more meth burners than we do in Europe - but please correct me if I am wrong. Most here use either a gascanister burner or a MSR or Primus liquid fuel one.

Used to have an old MSR Whisperlite but sold it for I wanted a burner that I could simmer better on. Still like to do some cooking (even though basic) when camping. Have replaced it with another MSR the Dragonfly and got a Bernie Dawg Dragon Tamer https://www.shapeways.com/product/B9FB7UDX5/berniedawg-dragontamer-3-for-msr-dragonfly-stove with it. If I had to buy a Dragon like burner again I would go for the titanium version to simply shave of some extra grams. With the Tamer on it makes a lot less noise compared to the Whiperlite and simmers like a charm. Lighting them takes a bit more practice and is a tadd harder than lighting a gas canister burner - but can live with that. I also like the fact that I have a choice of fuels to use. Though currently I am using either white gas but preferably Coleman fuel or Primus fuel for it gives no soot compared to using unleaded petrol. Coleman/ Primus in my experience just burns a little nicer and makes fuel go a bit longer than white gas.

Wondering though: how is the availability of Coleman or Primus fuel in Australia? I am not thinking of the big cities like Perth, Melboune, Sidney etc...

For pots I am going to try out the Evernew non stick pot and skillet. Used last year and the years before a GSI non stick pot and a MSR quick skillet. Reason to try out the Evernew pots are shaving off some grams. I always use the pots in combination with a cosy pot to conserve fuel.

User avatar
RonK
Posts: 10081
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Sat Mar 31, 2018 5:53 pm

You might find Coleman or Primus brand fuel in some specialist camping gear shops, but generally "white gas" is known here as shellite (you may also know it as naptha) and is sold widely in hardware stores, some service stations, even in some supermarkets.
Methylated spirits (metho) is even more commonly available since it's widely used as a household cleaner.
I'd say shellite stoves are waning in popularity here due to their cost and heavy, toxic fuel.
Trangia stoves have long been popular but with the trend to ultralight are being supplanted by homemade can stoves or titanium burners.
Canister stoves are popular and canisters are widely available.
I have both a Whisperlite and a Dragonfly in my stove collection. Neither have been used for years.
I'm quite fond of my titanium metho stove but metho is inconveniently sold in 1 litre quantities which is more than I want to carry.
So my gas canister stove usually gets the nod.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

User avatar
rifraf
Posts: 3487
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:55 pm
Location: Two Rocks, WA

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:06 am

iNGE wrote:JIf I had to buy a Dragon like burner again I would go for the titanium version to simply shave of some extra grams.


Just a comment on your idea to look at a Ti cooker.
After reading some favourable reviews I bought a Primus Ti Omnilite.
One place it falls flat on its face is due to the thin Ti metal.
Due to the lack of metal, it takes a hell of a lot of priming compared to other multi fuel cookers I've tried.
For a similar amount of alcohol it takes to prime the Omnilite, I can boil enough water in my Trangia to make a cup of tea.
The thin Ti plate is challenged to hold enough heat for the initial start up of kerosene and its easy to misjudge and end up with a flaring sooty flame if your not careful to adequately prime the stove.
I'm not suggesting the MSR suffers similarly but it is something to be aware of as a possibility.
There are repercussions to making a stove very light, so make sure your not buying a stove thats weight savings are going to have to be made up by carrying extra priming fuel.
Great little unit on butane (IMHO) but a little suspect on my previous fuel of choice.
Surly Ogre, Carry Freedom Y-frame Trailer, Extrawheel trailer.

User avatar
Warin
Posts: 578
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:13 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Warin » Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:06 am

rifraf wrote:One place it falls flat on its face is due to the thin Ti metal.
Due to the lack of metal, it takes a hell of a lot of priming compared to other multi fuel cookers I've tried.


The priming heat should be going into the fuel, not so much the metal. Try opening the fuel valve a little to prime the fuel tubes? May be even a little weeping of fuel while priming would help ... carefull with any resulting flare.

iNGE - Coleman fuel is usually only found in camping goods stores. Most people use shellite for them as that is far more widely avalible here in Australia. Flying with a liquid fuel stove requires that it does not smell of fuel .. and you need written permission from the airline too. Much easier with a gas canister stove - there is no liquid so they quickly loose any smell and as they are not liquid fuelled they don't require written permission. They also simmer well.

User avatar
rifraf
Posts: 3487
Joined: Fri Apr 15, 2011 5:55 pm
Location: Two Rocks, WA

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby rifraf » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:26 pm

Warin wrote: Flying with a liquid fuel stove requires that it does not smell of fuel .. and you need written permission from the airline too. Much easier with a gas canister stove - there is no liquid so they quickly loose any smell and as they are not liquid fuelled they don't require written permission. They also simmer well.


Having had my Optimus 111T (clean and tank filled with water) confiscated by Qantas a few years ago now still makes me steam.
I'd been to a few different countries and continents with it and for it to be "stolen" for a national flight (NSW to WA) was galling to say the least. I'd owned it for many a year.

I'm sure this was done by someone erring on the side of passenger safety which is a good reason for having done so, but for all that it was a frustrating and expensive exercise given it was very well taken care of and in great condition.

Moving right along, I think Warins suggestion of a gas (propane/butane) stove is the way to go these days if only to not incur the loss of a favourite stove by someone whose knowledge of whats "safe" may be a little unclear (with regards flying)

This with the obvious caveat of course that one doesn't try to board a flight with a canister. :D
Surly Ogre, Carry Freedom Y-frame Trailer, Extrawheel trailer.

Trevtassie
Posts: 641
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2015 10:57 am

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Trevtassie » Sun Apr 01, 2018 3:47 pm

They are pretty clear on the website about needing a permission letter, but the good thing is that letter is valid for a year and covers both Qantas and Jetstar.
Personally I've gone off liquid fuel entirely and now use a hosed gas stove with a preheat loop and butane cartridges because they are cheap ($1.11 for 220g of gas) and can be flipped to feed liquid gas to the stove.

iNGE
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:03 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby iNGE » Sun Apr 01, 2018 4:41 pm

Thanks all for your thoughts on stoves and fuel.

Good to know that shellite (naptha) is widely available but that gas canisters are also easy to get - will, keep this in the back of my head for once I make it to Australia (long time dream is to cycle Perth - Syney - with a stop in Tasmania. Need to save up first for I am cycling 2 months inCanada/ USA this summer). Will whenever I make it definitely think about a gas canister stove if it is so readily available as you all say.

Ronk -
I'm quite fond of my titanium metho stove but metho is inconveniently sold in 1 litre quantities which is more than I want to carry.
Why is the 1litre more than you would like to carry?

Rifraf - thanks for the info on the extra long priming time it takes. Am glad that I decided - ignorance is bliss sometimes :wink: - to go for the "normal' Dragonfly after reading this. If it holds up as well as the Whisperlite it will keep me company at least for another 20 -25 years. With a 30oz/ 890ml fule bottle I have enough fuel to last about 4 - 41/2 weeks in which I cook most days.

Warin -
Flying with a liquid fuel stove requires that it does not smell of fuel .. and you need written permission from the airline too. Much easier with a gas canister stove - there is no liquid so they quickly loose any smell and as they are not liquid fuelled they don't require written permission. They also simmer well.
Thanks for this bit of extra information. Did not know that you need written permission for a liquid fuel stove. Here it is enough if fuel bottle and stove do not smell of anything - dental cleasning tablets do a good job of that.

Suppose you wanted such a letter of permission from whom at an airline would you get one?

User avatar
Warin
Posts: 578
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:13 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Warin » Sun Apr 01, 2018 5:13 pm

iNGE wrote:Good to know that shellite (naptha) is widely available but that gas canisters are also easy to get - will, keep this in the back of my head for once I make it to Australia (long time dream is to cycle Perth - Syney


There are large gaps where there are not many people along some sections of that route ... you'll not find much there except for the occasional fuel and fast food stop in the way of supplies along some sections (think days). Some have even refused to supply water unless you buy it from the commercial plastic bottles in the fridge, those may have to get their water from rainfall or have it brought in by truck so it is a valued commodity. There are a few commercial camp grounds where you might find things. The bigger 'roadhouses' (large fuel service areas) where trucks stops can have showers for a modest fee, don't forget to fill your water bottles there.

iNGE wrote:Suppose you wanted such a letter of permission from whom at an airline would you get one?


For QANTAS - https://www.qantas.com/dangerousgoods/d ... ainers.pdf
Other airlines you'll have to ask, I'd start at where you expect to buy a ticket.
I found that the small fuel tubes retained fuel. The solution I found was to drain the fuel and then operate the stove - burning off as much as I could. Then treat it in anyway you want .. I just aired it.
Note the requirement to wrap in absorbent material and then in a sealed plastic bag detailed in the QANTAS document.

The regulations are ITATA - an international organisation for all airlines. So the drain, no fuel smell, bagging and wirtten permission should be required on all of them.

User avatar
RonK
Posts: 10081
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Sun Apr 01, 2018 6:06 pm

iNGE wrote:Ronk -
I'm quite fond of my titanium metho stove but metho is inconveniently sold in 1 litre quantities which is more than I want to carry.
Why is the 1litre more than you would like to carry?

A litre of metho weights a kilogram and is bulky. Metho is sold in very flimsy 1 litre containers so it's essential to decant or risk spills. My fuel bottle has a 500ml capacity, but limits usage. It's simply not convenient to carry compared to a 220gm canister.

My entire cook set fits with ease in the Anything bag, along with a canister of gas and a bag of meds/toiletries, and is carried in an Anything cage.

Image
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

iNGE
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:03 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby iNGE » Mon Apr 02, 2018 5:07 pm

Warin - thanks for the tips on the Perth - Sydney route. I already knew that I would encounter gaps with not many people or services available. Though when cycling it I would like to follow the coastline as much as possible. Good to know that
There are a few commercial camp grounds where you might find things. The bigger 'roadhouses' (large fuel service areas) where trucks stops can have showers for a modest fee, don't forget to fill your water bottles there.
Won't forget.

Brilliant the link to Quantas and a good suggestion to indeed start where buying a ticket.
The regulations are ITATA - an international organisation for all airlines. So the drain, no fuel smell, bagging and wirtten permission should be required on all of them.
I have not come across this requirement on the Dutch World Cyclists forum yet ie the written permission one. The no smell and a clean not smelly fuel bottle go without saying.

Note the requirement to wrap in absorbent material and then in a sealed plastic bag detailed in the QANTAS document.
Will keep this in mind as well - and will bag the stove as you indicated. Usually I just have it in its original bag.

Ronk - I understand - Flimsy bottles not convenient. And handy when
fits with ease in the Anything bag, along with a canister of gas and a bag of meds/toiletries, and is carried in an Anything cage
. I have my stove seperate from my pots for it simply does not fit. Though I put my Dromedary blatter, tea towel mu/pot in biggest pot (1.3L)

User avatar
Warin
Posts: 578
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:13 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Warin » Mon Apr 02, 2018 5:48 pm

iNGE wrote:Brilliant the link to Quantas and a good suggestion to indeed start where buying a ticket.
The regulations are ITATA - an international organisation for all airlines. So the drain, no fuel smell, bagging and wirtten permission should be required on all of them.
I have not come across this requirement on the Dutch World Cyclists forum yet ie the written permission one.


Most have not updated to the newer regs. Not everyone is examined .. so only a few are caught.

iNGE
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 10:03 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby iNGE » Wed Apr 04, 2018 4:34 pm

Lets hope they keep it that way :wink:

User avatar
Aushiker
Posts: 22194
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Fremantle, WA
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Aushiker » Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:52 pm

Image

The Primus OmniLite Ti-Stove is subject to a drop at Massdrop. US$119.99+postage. Seems a popular drop so I am guessing the price is good.
Andrew
Image

BobtheBuilder
Posts: 78
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:33 am
Location: Remote NT

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby BobtheBuilder » Tue Apr 10, 2018 9:14 pm

iNGE wrote:Did not know that you need written permission for a liquid fuel stove.


Neither did I and I've flown nationally and internationally for decades with my MSR Internationale! Made sure the bottle was empty and evaporated (don't think I've always cleaned it any more than that) and packed in the middle of my bag with the lid off, so can't be mistaken to be containing liquid... in the unlikely case that someone on the X-ray is paying attention!

On stoves, I'd go the MSR Internationale because even though I use shellite/white fuel/Coleman fuel, it can take about anything, including good old petrol (which is dirty and stinks, but readily available). Environmentally it's above most other forms because the only single-use item is the plastic bottle it comes in.

As far as simmering on it, you can approximate it if you put very low pressure in the bottle before lighting. Not optimal, but doable!

User avatar
Warin
Posts: 578
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 5:13 pm

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby Warin » Wed Apr 11, 2018 8:55 am

BobtheBuilder wrote:
iNGE wrote:Did not know that you need written permission for a liquid fuel stove.


Neither did I and I've flown nationally and internationally for decades with my MSR Internationale!


I too have flown with my fuel stove .. with no written permission. It was perfectly within the rules back then.
But the rules have changed.

The people doing the examinations should know the new rules. They don't check everyone.
If they get you then you will loose the stove ... if they know the new rules. If caught you have no option - you loose the stove, no exceptions.

BobtheBuilder
Posts: 78
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:33 am
Location: Remote NT

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby BobtheBuilder » Wed Apr 11, 2018 1:10 pm

Warin wrote:If caught you have no option - you loose the stove, no exceptions.


How would you be caught? By the X-ray examination in the baggage handling area?

Anyway, good to know, will make sure I get the permission next time I fly, I'd be totally devo to lose that stove - 16 years of loyal service!

User avatar
RonK
Posts: 10081
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:15 pm

BobtheBuilder wrote:How would you be caught? By the X-ray examination in the baggage handling area?

Have no doubt about it - rifraf lost his.
rifraf wrote:Having had my Optimus 111T (clean and tank filled with water) confiscated by Qantas a few years ago now still makes me steam.
I'd been to a few different countries and continents with it and for it to be "stolen" for a national flight (NSW to WA) was galling to say the least. I'd owned it for many a year.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

BobtheBuilder
Posts: 78
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:33 am
Location: Remote NT

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby BobtheBuilder » Wed Apr 11, 2018 4:38 pm

RonK wrote:Have no doubt about it - rifraf lost his.


Yes, but how?

I wouldn't make the mistake of drawing attention to it. How else would it be picked up?

User avatar
RonK
Posts: 10081
Joined: Mon Aug 24, 2009 2:08 pm
Location: Brisbane, Queensland
Contact:

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby RonK » Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:21 pm

BobtheBuilder wrote:
RonK wrote:Have no doubt about it - rifraf lost his.


Yes, but how?

I wouldn't make the mistake of drawing attention to it. How else would it be picked up?

That would be your first mistake. Failing to declare dangerous goods carries serious penalties.
The baggage xray will detect it. Bomb sniffers will detect it.
Cycle touring blog and tour journals: whispering wheels...

BobtheBuilder
Posts: 78
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:33 am
Location: Remote NT

Re: Stoves and Cookwear

Postby BobtheBuilder » Wed Apr 11, 2018 6:40 pm

RonK wrote:Failing to declare dangerous goods carries serious penalties.
The baggage xray will detect it. Bomb sniffers will detect it.


Mmmm... even if bomb sniffers would detect it, which I'm not convinced of, it's fairly unlikely they'd be used. Clearly baggage x-ray doesn't detect it, given how many people routinely carry camping stoves.

Regardless of that, the Qantas dangerous goods info is a bit unclear. It doesn't seem that pressurised liquid type stoves fall under the dangerous goods definition, though the liquid fuel containers that supply them do.

https://www.qantas.com/travel/airlines/ ... ing-stoves

Under "Camping stoves and liquid fuel containers" it says airline approval is required, whereas under "Gas camping stoves" it says approval isn't required.

As MSR and similar stoves are gas stoves by the time the fuel reaches them, I think it's reasonable to assume approval isn't needed. I think the issue is residual liquid fuel in equipment - this is what Qantas' flushing procedures imply: -

"I have drained (for at least one hour) all flammable liquids from the camping stove and tank/fuel containers, removed the mantle/wick"

https://www.qantas.com/dangerousgoods/d ... ainers.pdf

So, for those stoves, the only issue is the fuel container, which I always drain, wash and air dry for a good few hours before travel. Technically, it might need approval, and now that I know that it's required, I'd probably get it, just to be safe, but, being sensible, I don't think there's much chance of being caught.

In the case cited above, it would be interesting to know if there was an obvious smell or if it was declared beforehand. It might just be the bad luck of coming across an overzealous employee being on the crazy side of safe.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users