Plant Based Diet Thread

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mikesbytes
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby mikesbytes » Fri Dec 07, 2018 1:59 pm

Perhaps a little off topic, this morning I had my retiree class, consisting of older ladies and they were talking about ladies who have the issue caused by excessive iron in their diet and they pointed out that most cases are with post menopause as pre menopause they are loosing blood each month with their periods
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

CKinnard
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Fri Dec 07, 2018 2:58 pm

mikesbytes wrote:Perhaps a little off topic, this morning I had my retiree class, consisting of older ladies and they were talking about ladies who have the issue caused by excessive iron in their diet and they pointed out that most cases are with post menopause as pre menopause they are loosing blood each month with their periods


excess animal produce in their diet!!! :)
raise "The Blue Zones" next time, or 'Whole Foods Plant Based'!

CKinnard
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Re: Plant Based Diet Thread

Postby CKinnard » Fri Dec 07, 2018 3:14 pm

Nobody wrote:
CKinnard wrote:Then again, I've met slim people who have trouble maintaining weight on WFPB.
Klaper advises these to eat nuts regularly.

Considering this post on the issue of nuts, I think it's dangerous blanket advice to give. Since in some it should be raising their markers for CVD. It would be better if he advised all he gave that advice to, to get blood tested before and after nuts to see if they were getting an adverse reaction.


I wish it was as simple as The Fruit Doctor's understanding, though Mayo Clinic and the balance of studies think not.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-con ... t-20045192

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20458092
Sabaté J1, Oda K, Ros E.
Nut consumption and blood lipid levels: a pooled analysis of 25 intervention trials.
Arch Intern Med. 2010 May 10;170(9):821-7

Bento APN, Cominetti C, Simoes Filho A et al. Baru Almond Improves Lipid Profile in Mildly Hypercholesterolemic Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Crossover Study. Nutr Metab Cardovasc Dis 2014;24:1330-1336.

Choudhary K, Clark J, Griffiths HR. An Almond-Enriched Diet Increases Alpha Tocopherol and Improves Vascular Function, But Does Not Affect Oxidative Stress Markers or Lipid Levels. Free Radic Res 2014;48:599-606.

Griel AE, Kris-Etherton PM. Tree Nuts and Lipid Profile: A Review of Clinical Studies. Brit J Nutr 2006;96:S68-S78.

Kris-Etherton PM, Karmally W, Ramakrishnan R. Almonds Lower LDL Cholesterol. J Am Diet Assoc 2009;109:1521-1522.

Phung OJ, Makanji SS, White W, et al. Almonds Have a Neutral Effect on Serum Lipid Profiles: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Trials. J Am Diet Assoc 2009;109:865-873

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257681/
Ross, Emilio
Health Benefits of Nut Consumption
Nutrients. 2010 Jul; 2(7): 652–682.

"Abstract

Nuts (tree nuts and peanuts) are nutrient dense foods with complex matrices rich in unsaturated fatty and other bioactive compounds: high-quality vegetable protein, fiber, minerals, tocopherols, phytosterols, and phenolic compounds. By virtue of their unique composition, nuts are likely to beneficially impact health outcomes. Epidemiologic studies have associated nut consumption with a reduced incidence of coronary heart disease and gallstones in both genders and diabetes in women. Limited evidence also suggests beneficial effects on hypertension, cancer, and inflammation. Interventional studies consistently show that nut intake has a cholesterol-lowering effect, even in the context of healthy diets, and there is emerging evidence of beneficial effects on oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular reactivity. Blood pressure, visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome also appear to be positively influenced by nut consumption. Thus it is clear that nuts have a beneficial impact on many cardiovascular risk factors. Contrary to expectations, epidemiologic studies and clinical trials suggest that regular nut consumption is unlikely to contribute to obesity and may even help in weight loss. Safety concerns are limited to the infrequent occurrence of nut allergy in children. In conclusion, nuts are nutrient rich foods with wide-ranging cardiovascular and metabolic benefits, which can be readily incorporated into healthy diets."

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Fruit Doc should have controlled her 2 blood sample experiment by monitoring tightly her Calorie intake, weight, and intake of multiple other foods that influence cholesterol absorption in the gut i.e. fiber.

Also, it would have been more meaningful for her to get at least 3 blood tests as a baseline, to indicate what would be a significant change from one particular diet's baseline. And controlled for the average 19% variation of cholesterol over the menstrual cycle.

https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-re ... rual-cycle
https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/95/9/E80/2835175

Nevertheless, nuts have a lot of Calories, and as I said, if one struggles to keep weight down, then nuts are probably one of the first plant foods to eliminate.

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