Australia's most dangerous driving habits revealed

Scintilla
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Re: Australia's most dangerous driving habits revealed

Postby Scintilla » Wed Aug 08, 2018 1:03 pm

Thoglette wrote:
human909 wrote:Most industrial machinery have specific training regarding the processes in which to respond to an emergency, often this would for example be an emergency stop.
....
I've also experienced uncontrolled acceleration. The car was a manual so taking it out of gear wasn't just easy but very instinctual. (Though it should also be instinctual in an automatic.)

What surprises me is no-one in these situations ever, ever thinks of turning the ignition off.

Probably can't do it in half of today's cars but actual mechanical failure is so rare it's newsworthy.

Even just applying the brakes hard should slow the speed significantly in most modern cars, albeit only temporarily.

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mikesbytes
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Re: Australia's most dangerous driving habits revealed

Postby mikesbytes » Wed Aug 08, 2018 2:40 pm

Cheesewheel wrote:
Jmuzz wrote:
mikesbytes wrote:Is it illegal to eat or drink water/coffee while driving?


No, though they can claim it resulted in "not proper control" and you have to fight that in court.
297 (1) A driver must not drive a vehicle unless the driver has proper control of the vehicle.

RMS publication makes up some of their own stuff about both hands on wheel. What they publish is technically part of law but a magistrate might ignore it because they don't want to deal with publications and hansard and tort law mess that's for higher courts.

If you were swerving around then they can justify lack of control and evidence/admission you were eating helps their case.
Realistically a cop isn't going to pull someone over for it unless they are swerving around.


The moral to the story is don't eat McDonalds in front of police.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/ ... 3260e574a6

A stack of McDonald's hotcakes cost a Brisbane driver more than $250 after he was sprung by police eating behind the wheel at a northwest intersection on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old was charged with Failing to have Proper Control of a Motor Vehicle.


Stationary at the traffic lights is a bit stiff. Perhaps there's more to this story
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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Cheesewheel
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Re: Australia's most dangerous driving habits revealed

Postby Cheesewheel » Wed Aug 08, 2018 3:29 pm

mikesbytes wrote:
Cheesewheel wrote:
Jmuzz wrote:
No, though they can claim it resulted in "not proper control" and you have to fight that in court.
297 (1) A driver must not drive a vehicle unless the driver has proper control of the vehicle.

RMS publication makes up some of their own stuff about both hands on wheel. What they publish is technically part of law but a magistrate might ignore it because they don't want to deal with publications and hansard and tort law mess that's for higher courts.

If you were swerving around then they can justify lack of control and evidence/admission you were eating helps their case.
Realistically a cop isn't going to pull someone over for it unless they are swerving around.


The moral to the story is don't eat McDonalds in front of police.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/ ... 3260e574a6

A stack of McDonald's hotcakes cost a Brisbane driver more than $250 after he was sprung by police eating behind the wheel at a northwest intersection on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old was charged with Failing to have Proper Control of a Motor Vehicle.


Stationary at the traffic lights is a bit stiff. Perhaps there's more to this story

Well they were McDonalds pancakes. Envy is a powerful thing.
Go!Run!GAH!

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mikesbytes
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Re: Australia's most dangerous driving habits revealed

Postby mikesbytes » Wed Aug 08, 2018 9:40 pm

Cheesewheel wrote:
mikesbytes wrote:
Cheesewheel wrote:
The moral to the story is don't eat McDonalds in front of police.

https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/ ... 3260e574a6

A stack of McDonald's hotcakes cost a Brisbane driver more than $250 after he was sprung by police eating behind the wheel at a northwest intersection on Wednesday.

The 25-year-old was charged with Failing to have Proper Control of a Motor Vehicle.


Stationary at the traffic lights is a bit stiff. Perhaps there's more to this story

Well they were McDonalds pancakes. Envy is a powerful thing.

So the real penalty is the extra cm around the midriff :)
If the R-1 rule is broken, what happens to N+1?

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